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A “remorhaz” by WizKids, Nolzur’s line


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Just now, Doug Sundseth said:

You might like the Reaper Frost Wyrm, available in both Bones and metal. :poke:

Doug beat me to it, so instead of the store, I'll link to the one I painted... It's far from the only example on the forums, but I like it (go figure).

 

Reaper's doesn't have the weird flat face or the really long antennae-horns, but it does have terrifying death-scythe forearms, and it retains the neck frills, so I dig it.

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20 hours ago, boldfont said:

I went canon with this. No airbrush. It’s a great sculpt.

 

I have had much better luck with the Nalzur's larger models than their smaller ones, Their Silver Dragon is also very , very good, a perfect casting for 5 bucks.

 

this one looks good and your paint job does it justice.  Did you have to do any repairs, large gaps, re-sculpting,  or was it good to go?

 

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On 4/22/2019 at 1:24 PM, Fencig said:

I have had much better luck with the Nalzur's larger models than their smaller ones, Their Silver Dragon is also very , very good, a perfect casting for 5 bucks.

 

this one looks good and your paint job does it justice.  Did you have to do any repairs, large gaps, re-sculpting,  or was it good to go?

 

 

It was good to go. Just some flashing. 

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