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Pingo

Pingo has started a video series on paint and painting / art and arting

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On 5/14/2019 at 2:42 PM, Pingo said:

The day I start recording the second script would be the day the apartment building across the street starts taking out its windows with an angle grinder.

Usually this takes a while to happen for anyone doing videos... Congrats on reaching that milestone on your second video! ^_^

 

... That probably should have been purple. 

 

One of my favourite photographers had that happen, moves to his new flat aaaaand a week later the building next door has six months of construction on the exterior.  James rolled his eyes a lot those six months. 

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Excellent video. I'm looking forward to more. I disagree with everyone saying you spoke too fast, I found your speaking speed perfect. Then again maybe I just talk fast too and am used to it. Hmm... Anyway great video!

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Hmm.

 

Vocal rate of delivery: I don't think you need to change your speed at all. There's a need to speak slowly in some circumstances, but a ten-minute video doesn't need it. I've got all kinds of thoughts about this as a performer, but it can boil down to: you are speaking at about the speed I want for Shakespeare*. 

 

Moments of text: I did feel like the text came and went a little too quickly. But! I was mostly listening, not looking, for words. Any text in a ten-minute video is very easy to go back and read later if I feel so inclined.

 

Essentially, I think these two items are pretty good for the format of the video. In an hour-long lecture, you have the time to slow down a bit, repeat yourself, ensure the audience gets all the detail. A short video like this one is an introduction, a petit-four rather than a bundt. Move quickly enough to capture attention, but don't go so long for listening fatigue to set in.

 

 

 

 

*Iambic pentameter improves everything. Just a thought for the next video. (/Purple)

Edited by Sanael
My phone does not believe me when I tell it to make text purple...
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I don't have any feedback to add that hasn't already been given, but I enjoyed the video and I'm looking forward to more. 

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And subscribed...I though the pace of speech was fine. Having met you last year at Adepticon, I felt it was representative of how you speak.

 

Looking forward to more.

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The second video is up!

 

Color Mixing: Yellow and Black Make Green!

 

I hope people will find it useful and informative. I tried to speak slower in this one, and the background music is quieter.

 

EDIT: Good grief, it's already got three views.

Edited by Pingo
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The pacing is much improved thank you. Though with your first video, I found that customizing the play speed to 85-90% made it still sound natural and easy to follow.

 

There's still a ton of stuff to look at, but now it feels like a proper Easter Egg hunt that rewards repeated viewings.

 

Yellow is a very rebellious colour. It does it's own thing and is full of surprises. My pet peeve with yellow is when you look at concentrated yellow ink or food colouring, it's orange and gives no clue as to what to expect once diluted.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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Yep, the pacing is much better for me as well.

 

Pretty fascinating that there is a historical basis for obtaining a solid green prior to the developments of more modern blue pigments. My question would be, is this a result of these particular Yellow and Black pigments (i.e. their unique chemical makeup) or does this apply broadly across different pigment types? I.e. Does this work with say <insert brand of paint here> Black + Yellow?

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54 minutes ago, Al Capwn said:

Yep, the pacing is much better for me as well.

 

Pretty fascinating that there is a historical basis for obtaining a solid green prior to the developments of more modern blue pigments. My question would be, is this a result of these particular Yellow and Black pigments (i.e. their unique chemical makeup) or does this apply broadly across different pigment types? I.e. Does this work with say <insert brand of paint here> Black + Yellow?

 

Well, drat. I thought I addressed that in the video. I’ve tried this with lots of different bright yellows and several different blacks in the past and it always works.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Pingo said:

Well, drat. I thought I addressed that in the video.

 

You might have, but I didn't catch it? I did notice you tried three different Golden paints, with the most brilliant result coming from PY 74 (Hansa Yellow).

 

I can certainly give it a try at home for fun, and I would imagine that most paints will react similarly.

 

It is curious that it turns Green though, certainly not what someone would expect!

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1 hour ago, Cranky Dog said:

The pacing is much improved thank you. Though with your first video, I found that customizing the play speed to 85-90% made it still sound natural and easy to follow.

 

There's still a ton of stuff to look at, but now it feels like a proper Easter Egg hunt that rewards repeated viewings.

 

Yellow is a very rebellious colour. It does it's own thing and is full of surprises. My pet peeve with yellow is when you look at concentrated yellow ink or food colouring, it's orange and gives no clue as to what to expect once diluted.

 

There’s a color in oil paint I quite like. I think it’s Quinacridone Gold but I could be misremembering. It’s been a while.

 

When you squeeze it out of the tube, in mass tone, it looks like a dull Earthy brown, and that’s how it looks if you paint with it thickly.

 

But thin it down - my favorite method is to get a bit on a nearly dry hog’s bristle brush and scrub nearly all of it off - and it turns into an eye-popping transparent shining bright yellow. It’s great for glazes.

 

And it looks nothing like that when concentrated.

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8 minutes ago, Pingo said:

 

There’s a color in oil paint I quite like. I think it’s Quinacridone Gold but I could be misremembering. It’s been a while.

 

When you squeeze it out of the tube, in mass tone, it looks like a dull Earthy brown, and that’s how it looks if you paint with it thickly.

 

But thin it down - my favorite method is to get a bit on a nearly dry hog’s bristle brush and scrub nearly all of it off - and it turns into an eye-popping transparent shining bright yellow. It’s great for glazes.

 

And it looks nothing like that when concentrated.

 

Nickel Azo Yellow, maybe? It certainly has a different look in the bottle (where it looks a fair bit like Yellow Ochre) than when you thin it and glaze it on.

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I did a Reaper Dragon Black + Dragon White + S75 Yellow Ink recently, and got a very greenish gray. I didn't take it too far, since I wanted this to be an off-black color on the particular project. But yeah, another combo that'll go greenish. 

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3 hours ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Nickel Azo Yellow, maybe? It certainly has a different look in the bottle (where it looks a fair bit like Yellow Ochre) than when you thin it and glaze it on.

Sounds right to me.  I've done a bit of watercolor and a lot of those do it to an extent, but this one (and blends of it like New Gamboghe) are some of the most spectacular changes between thick tube paint and thinned wash

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