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Glitterwolf

Resin Water Effects, How to Seal a Base?

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Official WOOF's cry for help..

 

Lately I've been using several water effects on larger pieces.

This worked quite well, but I still had the problem of the stuff leaking.

 

Now I want to create a water effect portion on a larger oval or round base.

A mini will sit on a rock and there will be water around it with some marine life in it.

 

Now my main problem here is, how to seal that base so I can pour resin without leaking?

What do you use to prevent it?

Is there some material I can buy/use to enclose a round/oval base to do this?

 

I own several types of water effects, that's not the issue.

The issue is preventing leakage so it won't ruin the base in the end.

 

Anyone has experience with this?

 

 

 

Edited by Glitterwolf
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3 minutes ago, eldamir said:

I used basic Invisible tape to make the dam around the edge of the base for the last one that I did ( https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/85498-breast-cancer-dragon-yet-another-random-rainbow-challenger/ )

Seemed to work well enough with minimal leakage.

 

You mean like ordinary Scotch tape?

 

I want to pour resin at least a few inches deep though.

 

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor basic invisible tape

Edited by Glitterwolf

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Yeah .. that's what I used .. although mine was only about 1/8" deep, so you'll need a bit more strength depending on the depth of each layer.. 

 

Luke Towenm  in his waterfall tutorial ( https://youtu.be/c1QtnvgxFKA?t=1297 ), uses masking tape and wood glue for his dams.

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21 minutes ago, eldamir said:

Yeah .. that's what I used .. although mine was only about 1/8" deep, so you'll need a bit more strength depending on the depth of each layer.. 

 

Luke Towenm  in his waterfall tutorial ( https://youtu.be/c1QtnvgxFKA?t=1297 ), uses masking tape and wood glue for his dams.

 

Masking tape might work since it also prevents paint from dripping through.

But the base is plastic, will wood glue work then?

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54 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

I want to pour resin at least a few inches deep though.

 

If you need to do that in a single pour, hydrostatic pressure is going to start to become a problem. I'd consider using a membrane of some sort (maybe packaging tape?) with a hard dam to support the membrane and reduce the chance of blowouts. Lego bricks can make pretty decent walls of varying sizes, though you would need to use them in addition to the tape, because they can be difficult to remove from the side of the cured resin. If you can get away with multiple pours, though, many problems become much easier to solve.

 

26 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

 

Masking tape might work since it also prevents paint from dripping through.

But the base is plastic, will wood glue work then?

 

Masking tape is designed to be easily removed from what you've pressed it down onto. It needs to be easy to remove to keep from damaging the existing paint that it's protecting (which is its primary design goal). This also means that it does not adhere very strongly even when you want it to. IME, wood glue will peel away from plastic very easily.

 

You might think about using something like gaffer's tape to make the dam, but its texture would both be very visible in the resin and would tend to make the resin adhere to it strongly. To prevent that, you might be able to use a barrier of plastic film or perhaps parchment paper or wax paper (do a small test first) on the inside of the tape dam.

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4 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

If you need to do that in a single pour, hydrostatic pressure is going to start to become a problem. I'd consider using a membrane of some sort (maybe packaging tape?) with a hard dam to support the membrane and reduce the chance of blowouts. Lego bricks can make pretty decent walls of varying sizes, though you would need to use them in addition to the tape, because they can be difficult to remove from the side of the cured resin. If you can get away with multiple pours, though, many problems become much easier to solve.

 

 

Masking tape is designed to be easily removed from what you've pressed it down onto. It needs to be easy to remove to keep from damaging the existing paint that it's protecting (which is its primary design goal). This also means that it does not adhere very strongly even when you want it to. IME, wood glue will peel away from plastic very easily.

 

You might think about using something like gaffer's tape to make the dam, but its texture would both be very visible in the resin and would tend to make the resin adhere to it strongly. To prevent that, you might be able to use a barrier of plastic film or perhaps parchment paper or wax paper (do a small test first) on the inside of the tape dam.

 

Thanks, I used gaffer tape for my welcome to the jungle diorama, but it still leaked.

I didn't use a film or something then.

For that I didn't mind much because of the size and all.

 

But for a round/oval base 30/40/50mm I need it to stay clean.

Testing  will be necessary of course.

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I've used packing tape, but I agree with Doug that you probably need a support structure.  I remember Corporea used clay to make a dam on her cowboy diorama several years ago and there is a pirate king and queen I saw mounted on a cube of resin that had some useful tips for large pour projects.  (They made a mold out of plastic and did a lot of sanding.)  I can try to look them up when I'm not on a phone.

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14 minutes ago, LittleBluberry said:

I've used packing tape, but I agree with Doug that you probably need a support structure.  I remember Corporea used clay to make a dam on her cowboy diorama several years ago and there is a pirate king and queen I saw mounted on a cube of resin that had some useful tips for large pour projects.  (They made a mold out of plastic and did a lot of sanding.)  I can try to look them up when I'm not on a phone.

 

That Pirate piece was on the Craft Section on the Site.

Which has been removed with the new layout.

 

Making a mold of plastic is something I would need instructions for.

What to use and how...

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Luke Towan, a model railroader and scale diorama Aussie, is the man when it comes to water effects IMHO. Most of his dioramas use water effects, though I can't think of anything he has done round or oval.

 

Regardless, it looks like in most of his videos he uses masking tape to make the seal, and then paints some white glue around the edge of the tape to further seal it. Doesn't seem to have any leakage or a problem removing the seal once the resin has cured.

 

Example from his Rivers & Streams video.

Edited by ManvsMini
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9 minutes ago, ManvsMini said:

Luke Towan, a model railroader and scale diorama Aussie, is the man when it comes to water effects IMHO. Most of his dioramas use water effects, though I can't think of anything he has done round or oval.

 

Regardless, it looks like in most of his videos he uses masking tape to make the seal, and then paints some white glue around the edge of the tape to further seal it. Doesn't seem to have any leakage or a problem removing the seal once the resin has cured.

 

Example from his Rivers & Streams video.

 

Thx!

Another vote for tape.

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Maybe sink the base into a cup with straight/parallel sides?  Could even use a forstner bit and bore a hole in some wood of the right depth.  Seal the bottom edge with silicone.  Building some kind of berm around the packaging tape sounds like the best idea, and sealing the bottom edge with silicone or something similar.  Petroleum jelly would probably work on a 30mm base with little depth but you're going to be building some pressure and heat in there.

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2 minutes ago, BLZeebub said:

Maybe sink the base into a cup with straight/parallel sides?  Could even use a forstner bit and bore a hole in some wood of the right depth.  Seal the bottom edge with silicone.  Building some kind of berm around the packaging tape sounds like the best idea, and sealing the bottom edge with silicone or something similar.  Petroleum jelly would probably work on a 30mm base with little depth but you're going to be building some pressure and heat in there.

 

Thx!

Is a plastic base capable of handling that heat?

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For something a little bit sturdier than tape, how about using plasticine (or similar) to build a barrier around the base edge? Roll out a long sausage shape, place it on your worksurface between 2 lengths of smooth wood of equal height then flatten it along it's length using a rolling pin. This should give you a nice even flat ribbon of plasticine to wrap around your base to (hopefully) contain the water.

 

I'm not sure what the reaction between the plasticene & the water effect would be so you may need to use something like petroleum jelly on the inner edge before you pour?

 

 

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What about using a "fence" of plastic, sealed with the tape? It should give you the rigidity you need and still be able to be removed.

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