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Resin Water Effects, How to Seal a Base?


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42 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

Is a plastic base capable of handling that heat?

 

Probably, the actual temp usually doesn't go all that high. But that will vary with the plastic used and again a test is probably useful. Note that exothermic reactions like epoxy polymerization work just fine at lower temperatures (though a bit slower). You can probably cool the plastic from the outside as long as you're careful to keep the cooling fairly consistent and make sure you don't freeze anything. A refrigerator could help with this, but make sure you don't end up with butter in the model. :rolleyes:

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From what little I've done with resin, multiple pours work best for anything deep. Unless you are using a pressure pot, deeper pours will often result in bubbles that never make it out before the resin cures.

 

I would make the first pour 1 cm / half an inch deep or so to minimize any catastrophic failures of the tape dam. Once the first pour is cured it acts as a seal and helps hold the tape in place. You might end up having to sand and/or polish the sides to get it clear regardless of the material used as a dam.

 

Good luck, and pics or it didnt happen!

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15 minutes ago, DocPiske said:

From what little I've done with resin, multiple pours work best for anything deep. Unless you are using a pressure pot, deeper pours will often result in bubbles that never make it out before the resin cures.

 

I would make the first pour 1 cm / half an inch deep or so to minimize any catastrophic failures of the tape dam. Once the first pour is cured it acts as a seal and helps hold the tape in place. You might end up having to sand and/or polish the sides to get it clear regardless of the material used as a dam.

 

Good luck, and pics or it didnt happen!

 

Thanks!

Hmm, it might not be that deep after all.

I measure in CM and I told you guys a few inches...

I mean a few cm, maybe 2 to 3 cm will do the trick.

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When I did my partial circle pour I lubricated my plastic dam with a thin coating of oil, which prevented the resin from adhering to it. 

 

Something I have heard of doing for deep pours, but have never tried myself, is to take a small sheet of plywood and set it on top of four kitchen sponges - one for each corner.  Place your project in the middle.  Next affix a vibrating back massager to the board and fire it up.  The sponges will help deaden the vibrations some, but there will still be enough for air bubbles to work their way up before the resin cures.  Obviously you need your dam to be secure or else the vibrations could cause it to fail.

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Thank you all for the advice.

 

My first one will be a base for the Komodo Dragon, just a few cm and little resin.

If this works, the next project will be larger and will need a deeper pour.

 

That one will take a while before I build it, it has something to do with a Chronoscope Scuba Girl, a shipwreck and a seamonster.

For the last one I still have to decide which one to use, the Bones IV Zombie Shark? A Marine Dinosaur? A Dunkleosteus? And some sunken treasure.

This will be a big undertaking.

 

So starting small first, WIP in the Lost World Thread.

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