Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Kangaroorex

Question about sealing mettalics

Recommended Posts

I recently finished kaphrixis using the scale 75 copper metallics.  It's for a gift so it needs to be sealed and I am at a loss as to what to use.  Using either a glosscoat or a dullcote will change the brightness of the metal.  Does anyone  have suggestions on which way to go?  Or is there another option?  If it were to remain mine I would just put it in the display case unsealed.

 

Thanks for any help.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't think a gloss coat would negate the metallic effect.  Even a dullcoat will allow some sparkle through--though it can look more satiny than metallic with dull.  Gloss will just give it more bright high spots.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always seal, and the latest one with metallics ( Asian Dragon) and Ki'Rinn were sealed with Brush in sealer from Reaper ( Dragon) or Satin Antishine Spray from Army Painter ( KI'RInn).

When I painted my Scorpion in metallics I also used Brush on.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will this gift end up being on display or handled, do you think? I don't know much about the scale 75 paint line, so I don't know how durable it is.

 

You could always varnish it (gloss and matte) then go back and re-highlight some spots to bring the metal brightness back. Just do some edges.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Kangaroorex said:

I recently finished kaphrixis using the scale 75 copper metallics.  It's for a gift so it needs to be sealed and I am at a loss as to what to use.  Using either a glosscoat or a dullcote will change the brightness of the metal.  Does anyone  have suggestions on which way to go?  Or is there another option?  If it were to remain mine I would just put it in the display case unsealed.

 

Thanks for any help.

 

Technically there is a scale for sheen (or gloss) levels.  House paint has eggshell, satin and semi-gloss, for example.  If you check an art supply shop you should be able to find at least a satin acrylic sealer.  If you used that and then touched up raised areas with gloss then you might get close to the effect you want.  I would try some tests first, though.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another option I have used is after sealing (which inevitably knocks down the gleam of the metal flakes) is to paint over just the highest highlights with a matching enamel metallic flake paint such as Testors. Used sparingly it brings back the gleam and is pretty durable.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would experiment with thinning Reaper Gloss Sealer to varying degrees (it's the only gloss sealer I have and have used it to seal my metallics). I wouldn't recommend anything intended to kill shine (even Reaper's Brush-on sealer has a bit of matting agent in it), since it will result in a duller finish. Which can be cool, but not if you want it to be shiny

 

I would strongly suggest doing a quick test mini (or section of one) painted the same as Kyphrixis to experiment on. Doing it on paper won't give a good feel for how the light will interact with a sealed 3D surface. 

 

I hope that helps! 

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to everyone for their input.  To answer the main question this is a display piece.  So far as I know the young lady it's for does not play rpgs or tabletop, Although this might change.  I am going to try a little experimentation with a second kaphrixis I am basecoating.  I have most of the sealers mentioned here and I can give them a try.  Here is what I am trying to seal, Although the camera does not do it justice

20190610_211803.thumb.jpg.b8c60300995bfdd673aa5e48c001e195.jpg

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It mostly depends on what you think is acceptable: 
if you use matt sealer you'll kill the metal shiny;
if you use a satin sealer you'll kill the metal shiny and make it look like the fake metal they use on kids toys;
if you use a glossy sealer it will look like metallic lacquers or metallized varnish on cars.

In a way or other you'll change it and it will not look like metal.
Anyway metal paints have an high resistance to manipulation, the only problem is that touching it with the fingers will kill the shiny too... :grr:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Cicciopiu said:

It mostly depends on what you think is acceptable: 
if you use matt sealer you'll kill the metal shiny;
if you use a satin sealer you'll kill the metal shiny and make it look like the fake metal they use on kids toys;
if you use a glossy sealer it will look like metallic lacquers or metallized varnish on cars.

In a way or other you'll change it and it will not look like metal.
Anyway metal paints have an high resistance to manipulation, the only problem is that touching it with the fingers will kill the shiny too... :grr:

this it pretty much my problem in a nutshell. 

On the plus side, it is on Bones material so its less likely to rub off than it would be on metal or resin.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the size of the base and the fact that it's intended primarily for display, I'd honestly be tempted to not seal it.  Or at least not seal the metallic parts.  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By TaleSpinner
      So, after a lot of thought, research, and discussion, my wife and I have decided to purchase a lost-wax casting system.  Essentially this is a system for casting any metal with a melting point below 2000 deg F into jewelry, minis, etc.  Unlike the spin casting used by companies like Reaper, this will be low volume with only 10 to 50 pieces a day possible.  
       
      I should note right away, that I do not intend at this time to go into minis production/sales on my own.
       
      So what do I intend to do with it:
       
      Make jewelry for my wife and our business.  Eventually (10+ years), we would like to get into producing our own line of gold and silver jewelry and become seasonal vendors at various Ren Fairs as a retirement career once the kids are out of college. Of course this is a long term goal and won't happen for a long time yet.  I'll practice on copper and pewter first. Make rings for our sister parish in Haiti.  Due to various cultural reasons, most Haitians won't get married until they have a pair of rings.  This can be very hard for some of the poorer people, so they just stay apart and don't get married.  My wife can by old jewelry under value and I'll be able to melt them down and make them new rings and send them down to them as they need it. (We've been giving them the rings she finds, but this way we will be able to cast them in the shapes and sizes they actually need/want.) Make armatures for my sculpts.  I spend a lot of time resculpting skulls and basic forms because I have to start from scratch.  This will allow me to make a library of animal armatures and other stuff to speed up my sculpting.  Also, I will be able to produce better sculpts by being able to control how much and what type of metal is in the armature.  I don't ever want to send Reaper another piece of furniture that warps on the mold again (bookcase, I'm looking at you). For sculpts I can't/don't want to sell, I'll be able to make copies for my friends and I (maybe even some goodies for things like the BOGW  ). I'm sure I'll think up other uses as I get more skilled at it.  
      I started reading, studying, and taking some classes on the subject in the past few years. I'm at a point where the only way forward is to take the plunge and buy the equipment so I can begin practicing and learning for real. My finances are at a good spot for it now, so I took the plunge and ordered a kit from Gesswein.  The following equipment is on its way:
       
      Rubber mold vulcanizer (small single figure version of what Reaper uses) Wax injector (for making wax copies in the rubber molds) Burnout oven (for baking the wax copies out of the molds before casting) Vacuum casting machine (for removing air from the molds and later pulling the metal into the molds during casting) Flasks, investment, wax bits, rubber, and lots of other materials needed.  
      Here is a picture of the kit I bought:
       

       
      I won't be able to just jump in and start casting right away.  I still will need to get a method of melting the metal (either a torch or an electric furnace).  I'll also need to rework my basement studio with new benches, electrical outlets, and venting to make it safe, which is where this thread comes in, as I thought you all might be interested in this, so I plan on documenting everything here, from the unboxing, to the building, to the first cast piece.
       
      I'm very very excited!
       
      Andy
    • By Sophie was taken
      I’ve got some of both these products, but I’m not sure exactly how they’re supposed to be used.
       
      I’ve tried the primer a few times, but compared to spray primer it’s very liquidy (not a surprise, since it’s a liquid). The issue is I don’t know if it is being properly applied or just running off into the cracks. It doesn’t turn the metal white, but I don’t even know if that is supposed to happen or not. Am I using it correctly?
       
      As for the brush-on sealer, what is it for and what does it do? I’m assuming it goes on at the end, and if that means I don’t need to buy yet another aerosol product, that would be swell.
    • By Darcstaar
      This is was my entry for the 4th quarterly Reaper Facebook contest.  It was good enough for 3rd place!
       
      There were so many well painted models, and awesome interpretations.
       
      As I was planning it, my starting idea was copper nmm.  I didn't want the typical verdigris.  Then I thought a bluish or purple to counter the orange, so that got me thinking Drow with purple glazed into her shadows. 
       
      Then I took that farther to try to get OSL in her eyes, shield, and base as if she was casting 'protection from good' or something.
       
      Sadly, the OSL was saved to the end when I ran out of time.  So I tried a bright rim around those areas, then a purple glaze.  It wasn't striking enough for my tastes, but ... deadlines!
       
      So, I hope you like her.
       
      Sorry if the photo is blurry, it's a cell phone screen grab.
       
      C&C welcome.
    • By SparrowMarie
      I'm looking for a spray on sealant that won't make bones all sticky. I'm going to be applying some decals to my TARDIS and would like them to stay put. Any advice/recommendations?
    • By Skrill
      Hi,
      Here is my take on Kyphrixis painted as a Copper Dragon.
      I used metallic (craft) paints throughout.
      What I found the hardest was to try to break the monotony of a big metallic piece and give him character.
      I mostly used various alternated washes to try to accomplish that, and a good dose of verdigris.
       
      C&C always appreciated.
      (Also, due to the metallic sheen, I struggled to take good pictures so I varied backgrounds)

       
  • Who's Online   11 Members, 1 Anonymous, 35 Guests (See full list)

×