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I think it's going to be useful at both ends of the painting spectrum. Painters on the low side are going to be able to use it to knock out minis to a tabletop standard more quickly, and pros are already finding interesting ways to take advantage of its properties.

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15 hours ago, Wren said:

That can be challenging and require more brush control than people slapping around washes to do quick painting might expect.

 

I would also imagine that color correction is a bit more challenging too, if this is essentially underpainting/grisaille. I have found that opaque paints tend to be a bit easier to fix instead of the inherently translucent layers of washes and inks.

 

Edit: Miniac (SDubs) confirmed what I suspected as well.

Edited by Al Capwn
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1 hour ago, Al Capwn said:

 

I would also imagine that color correction is a bit more challenging too, if this is essentially underpainting/grisaille. I have found that opaque paints tend to be a bit easier to fix instead of the inherently translucent layers of washes and inks.

Yeah, that's something I've seen from people using the paints. If you have overlap between two colors, you have to paint over it with the wraithbone or grey seer to fix it.

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Yep, that's what I meant about similar to watercolour - less forgiving of mistakes, and more difficult to repair. Also it's a mind shift to think of starting from the lightest point and going darker instead of darker up or working back and forth. Not that it's impossible or anything, but it's very different if you're used to standard acrylic/oil painting processes. 

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So, after looking into this some more, I noticed that quite a few of the models painted with certain Contrast paints seemed rather splotchy in their open areas like armor plates. Even in a picture from an GW event itself, where some sort of Space Marines (?) were painted in different colors, some paints look better to me than others. From reviews, some colors are also a lot more transparent than others, giving models painted with just one coat a pastel look with some more saturated areas in between.

One youtube reviewer actually had a friend who was relatively new to the hobby try out the paints according to the GW tutorial. That friend managed to paint his model, but also complained about not being able to pick out the details like he wanted to. Painting something with a very soaked brush and kinda runny paint while not messing up the undercoats of other areas is difficult.

 

Again, I find the whole thing rather interesting, especially when seeing more novice painters use the colors. But I don't see them as "revolution" or am planning to buy a bunch of them to sit my D&D players down and have them paint my Bones KS 4 minis. I will continue to try to get them to sit down and paint my KS 4, but with common acrylic paints.

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Tried 'em out today. Wasn't hugely impressed with ork flesh. I'll give it a few more goes, but I may stick with my current recipe. I think it might still be useful as a glaze, but it was a bit too splotchy and uneven for my tastes, even over an ork's skin. Warp Lightning worked all right on a grot pretty well, though. Iyandan Yellow and Blood Angel Red worked fairly well. One coat, and I had a nice, relatively even yellow and red respectively. I'll probably use those even when I'm not speed-painting, just with some bloodstain red in the shadows and going up a bit in highlights. Granted, it's always easier over white, but I still tend to struggle to get my reds and yellows to paint evenly without starting at bloodstain red and working up, which is more work. Cygor Brown and Snakebite Leather both gave decent results. Not as good as a higher effort paint job, obviously, but still credible for tabletop. I've only used Skeleton Horde for teeth so far, but it looked pretty nice.

 

Took me about forty-five minutes to have an ork and a grot mostly done. I'll need to pick out some more details once I'm done, but I'm pretty pleased with the results. I'll probably be using them a lot as I work to bring my ork army to completion.

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So there is a "Contrast Medium" or something like that.  Has anyone tried thinning regular paints with that?    Or maybe using the medium and some artist inks.

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1 hour ago, lowlylowlycook said:

So there is a "Contrast Medium" or something like that.  Has anyone tried thinning regular paints with that?    Or maybe using the medium and some artist inks.

 

I was wondering about this also. If the contrast medium's properties are not altered by adding paint or ink, it would open up a much larger colour range to the artist & be more cost effective.

 

Also, it looks like GW has phased out their 4 "Glaze" colours, presumably the contrast paints replace them now?

 

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Here you go!

 

zcW19iN.jpg

 

Entirely done with contrast paints. Not the greatest paintjobs, but for the amount of time it took, not bad either. The black-as-metal isn't very convincing, but I think a drybrush of gunmetal over it would work fairly well. Some minimal shading/highlighting would make these look fairly nice.

 

I don't think they entirely eliminate the need for other paints, even when doing basic tabletop jobs. But I definitely think they have potential to speed things up quite a bit.

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A friend went on a bit of a spree and bought all the contrast paints.  I made a trip back home and picked up paints some surplus orcs I've had laying around.  We threw paint around just to see what happened.

 

Contrast.thumb.jpg.c6600013e08649299e6e898a97e6858e.jpg

The nurglings in the middle show off what I'd call a standard quick technique.  Put on a base coat (in this case I think the were pale olive, pale green and just the white primer) cover with the new "Gloss" Nuln Oil then finally apply the contrast paint liberally (nurgle flesh here).

 

Some quick and random  notes

  • The glossiness of the coat under the Contrast makes a big difference.
  • In general I think the mid tones worked best.  Dark colors didn't show as much contrast and light colors tended to seem like a wash.
  • I was surprised how much I liked the white and black contrast paints.
  • The paints labeled as human (or dwarf) flesh didn't look too great over white primer.  Maybe with the right undercoat they'd be better.
  • It's a pain to try and decide when the gloss wash was dry.
  • The Contrast Medium could be pretty useful but for good results  I think you have got to get the ratio spot on.

 

 

 @JackMann do you remember which color you used on the goblin's shirt?

 

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I've done two figures with it so far and like it for the most part.  I don't slap it on quite as heavily as I've seen a lot of people do online just to avoid having to wick excess away.  Overall I'm pretty happy with them for getting about 75-90% done in one or two coats and then finishing off with a bit of highlighting edges and some minor blending where the Contrast was splotchy.  I wouldn't use solely Contrast other than for the purpose of getting something to tabletop super quick, but it's definitely a tool in the toolbox for me going forward. 

 

One thing I did notice is that they aren't all created equal.  Some cover with much more saturation while others are closer to a wash.  Also, with almost no exceptions I found that you can't really tell what your are going to end up with just looking at the paint in the pot or while it is still wet.  You pretty much have to see it applied and dry to know what that particular one is going to end up looking like.  Thankfully there are quite a few examples out there on the net so you can pretty much find examples of all the colors applied if you have one you haven't personally tried.

 

I think it matters a lot what you're painting as well.  For display obviously you would do a lot more in addition to them, but for tabletop they are going to be pretty awesome. I might actually paint that Moria goblin army now.

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Sprayed a sacrificial Bones mini with the wrathbone. No issues so far, but we'll see if any crop up after I get it painted up and sealed.

 

Of course, I could just use the airbrush to put some vallejo or stylnylrez on it, but this is for Science!

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Sorry for the double post, but here's the mini!

 

nv6zfSK.jpg

 

EDIT: I'll check it over the next few days for any tackiness, but no problems so far.

Edited by JackMann
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