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Well I haven't gotten to play with them yet but I did get to see some live demos at free RPG day.  I liked the way the yellow bone and wyckwood came out the wood color didn't come out and either.

 

Green did pretty well.  Bug losers I saw were the blues and reds, but those were on smooth surfaces and they seem to universally fail at those.

 

I get to try some on Monday when I get home.

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Picked up a couple of these when they hit the shelves, haven't had much chance to play around with them yet. Gonna try the blue for police uniforms for my pulp stuff, see how that turns out. Green for lizard-types out of the Bones 4.

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It's interesting stuff. I'm firmly in the "play with new tools so you know what's out there" camp, so I picked one up and did a few tests. 

 

I tried mixing several mediums and paints to see if I could match what is happening with it, the closest I came was Greenstuffworld's Master Medium (I absolutely love this stuff, BTW, everyone should check it out) + Reaper Clears. Unfortunately, that doesn't really lend itself to speed painting as the clears only come in 6 (? I think) colors so nearly everything would end up a custom mix.

It still might be cheaper, but whatever. They are pretty good at what they do, but to me they look half done. I think it still needs thinned if you want to get away with them as the only thing on a section, otherwise the coverage is a little too intense on flat areas. I think, if I decide to use them on a project, it will be for one major section of an army (like orc skin on 100 orcs, or something), then everything else would get traditional paint, and I'd still go back and highlight the skin a bit. The shading on them is as advertised, but the auto-highlights are hit or miss depoending on the model's texture.

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I see these contrast paints and all I can think of is how much it looks like what you get with Future ( now Pledge ) Floor Finish (Its Acrylic) mixed with regular paint. Future keeps the pigment from separating, and works great with craft paints. 1 part future to 1-8 parts water, then use this to thin your paints. 

I'll have to dig out some figs. Been using this since I started painting back in 99 or so. 

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I tried the contrast snakebite leather. It was very similar to a paint the Warstore used to sell. It is very thin and has less surface tension. This makes it sink into the cracks better. They are not bad, but I don’t anticipate needing ant more of these paints. 

 

    Buckyball 

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Exactly what future does for you. You can also add a single drop of soap or Jet Dry which will break the surface tension.

 

Ah I need to speedpaint some figs using it... 

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Been seeing comments about these everywhere and was curious how they differ from inks and washes we've been using for years? I know I use a lot of the Army Painter washes when I'm doing speed paints.

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8 minutes ago, Zink said:

Been seeing comments about these everywhere and was curious how they differ from inks and washes we've been using for years? I know I use a lot of the Army Painter washes when I'm doing speed paints.

Difference is mainly in the medium I think.  It's closer to a glaze medium.  If you don't get to carried away glopping it on, it has enough tension to hold itself in place unlike most washes.  Also dries faster than most of my washes.  I think of it as somewhere in between a wash and a glaze in consistency.

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1 hour ago, Erifnogard said:

Difference is mainly in the medium I think.  It's closer to a glaze medium.  If you don't get to carried away glopping it on, it has enough tension to hold itself in place unlike most washes.  Also dries faster than most of my washes.  I think of it as somewhere in between a wash and a glaze in consistency.

 

Sounds similar to some transparent paints I have from Vallejo. They have a higher ratio of medium to pigment so they aren't watery but work well for shading and such.

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9 minutes ago, Zink said:

 

Sounds similar to some transparent paints I have from Vallejo. They have a higher ratio of medium to pigment so they aren't watery but work well for shading and such.

I don't know that I would go so far as to say these aren't watery, just not as prone to running as a straight up wash. 

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On 6/9/2019 at 3:11 PM, JackMann said:

One caution: They will not go on over bare Bones. They're too thinned to be able to find purchase. You will need to prime the Bones first. The good news is that you don't need to use their included primer. Any white or near-white primer will work well enough. It flows a little better over their contrast primers due to the satin finish, but they'll still get decent results with, say, Vallejo white primer.

 

This is the one question that most interests me: What are the properties I need to look for in an undercoat to get the best out of contrast paints? I am interested in playing around with them, but the investment in GW's purpose-formulated primers is more than I really want to drop just to play with it.

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Another difference in the medium is the shrinking. It tends to pull from edges more, which is how the "highlights" are added. Essentially, it pools really well in recesses, and only minimally tints the highest points.

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I wonder how well Contrast  Paints would work over something primed Zenithal style?

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Pretty terrible, at least if you go from black to white. Starting with a medium gray to white might work a bit better.

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