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Loup_Garou_Gras

"Priming" regular Bones figures with Reaper Inks

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Quick question, do all colors of the Reaper Inks adhere to the original bones material as well as the brown ink color?  And when using the inks in this capacity can you use a very light coat, or should one apply it in a heavy fashion? 

I have also purchased some Folk Art Glass and Tile Medium, and am experimenting with it, but was wondering if any of you have a preference for the Folk Art Medium over the inks? 

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I think "Liners" is what you're looking for. Brown Liner is often used as a primer coat with Bones and many seem to prefer it to primer.  I've used that and Sepia with success.  Use it straight out of the bottle. 

 

 

 

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I have found the brown, blue, and grey liners to be very robust.  You can apply it in a thin layer and still get solid coverage.  Some people thin it with medium, but I usually just go straight from the bottle and work it with the brush if I want to thin it out.

 

The green and red liners are less robust.  Red being less robust than green in my experience.

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Despite Inarah’s success with Sepia Liner, many on these forums have had poor results with Sepia Liner for Bonesium first coat primer.   If you don’t mind starting with a darker canvas to paint from, it might be safer to go with Brown.  You can also mix Liners with a little White Brush on Primer.  I have done that when I want a little lighter background than Brown, and have not had a problem with adherence.  It did end up as a sort of pinkish color, though.

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I have tried Reaper's brush-on primer on both metal and bonesium and been very disappointed. I do not seem to get the kind of even coat that I am used to with Vallejo's equivalent. Am I perhaps not mixing it well enough? It seems to be a thinner consistency than the VMC primer.

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27 minutes ago, ecs05norway said:

I have tried Reaper's brush-on primer on both metal and bonesium and been very disappointed. I do not seem to get the kind of even coat that I am used to with Vallejo's equivalent. Am I perhaps not mixing it well enough? It seems to be a thinner consistency than the VMC primer.

 

As long as you're not getting texture that shows through the paint when the figure is finished and the paint is sticking, that should really be all that matters. Opacity isn't important for a primer.

 

FWIW, I've been able to get that with Reaper Brush-On Primers. (Though for Bones, experience has shown the dark-colored liners to be better primers than the brush-on primers.) If you can't get enough coverage for the paint to stick or if the paint still shows brush strokes from the primer, it might be a problem of damaged primer or poor mixing.

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3 hours ago, ecs05norway said:

I have tried Reaper's brush-on primer on both metal and bonesium and been very disappointed. I do not seem to get the kind of even coat that I am used to with Vallejo's equivalent. Am I perhaps not mixing it well enough? It seems to be a thinner consistency than the VMC primer.

I am not sure how well the liner would work on a metal mini since it is not actually primer. Works well enough for bones plastic though. 

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3 hours ago, ecs05norway said:

I have tried Reaper's brush-on primer on both metal and bonesium and been very disappointed. I do not seem to get the kind of even coat that I am used to with Vallejo's equivalent. Am I perhaps not mixing it well enough? It seems to be a thinner consistency than the VMC primer.

Do you mean the Primer or the Liner?

Because the latter is not a primer, people noticed it works well as one on Bones.

Although I have used Grey Liner as a primer for a metal mini once and that worked well.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

Do you mean the Primer or the Liner?

Because the latter is not a primer, people noticed it works well as one on Bones.

Although I have used Grey Liner as a primer for a metal mini once and that worked well.

 

 

 

Nope, RMS Brush-On White Primer, 09108.

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Just now, ecs05norway said:

 

Nope, RMS Brush-On White Primer, 09108.

 

Thanks for clearing that up.

I use Reaper Liner for Bones and Resin.

Normally I use Vallejo Brush on or Army Painter Spray Primer for Metal

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The reason for my questions with this is that I have been using Bones miniatures to practice on after viewing the Jeremie Bonament videos.  What I have hit upon that seems to work well for me is a mixture of 2 drops Folk art glass and tile medium + 2 drops of water + 1 drop of brown liner.  The brown liner allows me to confirm that an area has been primed, and thinning the medium keeps it from being too goopy.  The liner also helps me to pick out details.  I have tested thinned paints to a moderate glaze consistency and they do not bead up at all on this combo. I have experimented with using both thinned and unthinned acrylic medium, but I struggled to see if an area was adequately covered.  I guess I cold have added brown liner to diluted medium as well, and this would likely be a less expensive option to the Folk Art medium.

Edited by Loup_Garou_Gras

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3drops of medium and liner to 2 drops of water?  

Sounds risky.

 

Bonesium is slightly Hydrophobic, and too much water is going to cause issues.  

(I usually use 2 drops liner to 1 drop of water. Anything more I feel is to take unnecessary risk)

 

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SID7506lg.jpg.f5dc3df21ed612418898d456a201c0bb.jpg  THE LAWGIVER SPEAKS

1. PRIMER IS A MATTER OF PREFERENCE. Bonesium has enough "tooth," as a rule that primers aren't STRICTLY necessary, but lots of people, Dr. Bedlam included, like to use Reaper Brown Liner as a basecoat. Thin enough, and it brings out the details of the figure while adding to the "tooth" and helping paint to get and stay on there evenly. Inarah says she uses it straight out of the bottle; Dr. Bedlam thins it a little with water, dipping his brush in the paint cup, then applying the Liner. Either way works, it's all a matter of preference.

2. WASH THE  DRATTED BONES FIRST. Their reputation for hydrophobia is largely because that when you BUY your Bones, (or wait until someone else does, and then attack them in the parking lot, like some of us do) they are coated with silicon mold release, a hydrophobic chemical that makes 'em easier to knock out of the molds. This chemical repels water and will give you great headaches in the painting process until it is removed.

Dr. Bedlam uses a tepid water flow and a soft bristled toothbrush dunked in dishwashing soap, carefully scrubbing and soaping the entire figure, rinsing, and repeating at least once, a thing for which his long suffering spouse curses him mightily for leaving the dratted toothbrush out. Unless there are mouselings involved. She loves mouselings.

3. AVOID YE THE SPIRITS. Alcohol based primers, paints, and sprays will attack Bonesium, causing it to become tacky; it will never completely DRY, due to a continuing chemical reaction between the paint and the plastic that will eventually damage the figure. Petrochemical based primers, paints, and sprays will do the same thing, but MORE so, and quicker; I've painted Bones and then used a spray clear coat with an alcohol based propellant, to get the stuff out of the can, right? It worked fine... until I took the little guy off the shelf, three months LATER and he was sticky like he'd been dipped in maple syrup. Have a care about your paints, clear coats, sprays, and so forth when it comes to Bones, and stick to water based acrylics and coats wid no spirits in them.

                                                                                                                                                                       THE LAWGIVER HAS SPOKEN. SID7506lg.jpg.ec98039161524d6269f4e569a2750379.jpg

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