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Randomness XVI: Brains versus Bleach - an Epic Rap Battle in Iambic Pentameter.


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30 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Premature abandonment of cannons was a real problem, and not just for the F-4.

 

 

I grew up listening to F-4 engine tests in the middle of the night across the base, so it has a place in my soul. Four-ships taking off under burner directly over our house, though, not so much. The takeoff-end of the runway at Zweibruecken was pointed directly at France, so even more than usually, it was important to get up to a reasonable maneuvering speed quickly.

 

Ugly as sin, of course, but in a utilitarian way.

 

 

Used to see them flying the valleys in Germany pretty regularly. Criminal use of that airframe.

 

 

You mean the Thunderbolt II? ::P:


I agree, Warthog is a fine name that matches the personality of the plane.

 

 

I'm kind of partial to Rhino for the F-4, BUFF for the B-52, and SLUF for the A-7.

 

For anyone interested in more on nicknames, you might like this page.

 

Agreed - abandoning cannons in fighters was a bit of a mistake, but the bean counters were probably partially to blame for that

As to other nicknames, the F-111C was known as the 'Pig' in service, which is missing from that page of nicknames - and that wasn't because it was a pig of an aircraft....it was because they actually liked it. Of course the fact that it's entirely covered with asbestos sheeting was a minor issue (mach 1.2 at sea level...fast enough for the heat generated to distort a metal airframe)

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18 minutes ago, ratsmitglied said:

What's the saying about ww2 air support...

 

When the British fly over the Germans duck

When the Germans fly over the Allies duck

When the Americans fly over everyone ducks

::P:

For those too young and without the inclination to study military history:

In WWII the Americans engaged in High Altitude Bombing using the Norden Bombsight as the aiming device.  The Norden was good enough to be used well into the Vietnam Era.  Unfortunately, WWII ordinance wasn't and bombs dropped from high altitude were subject to all the weather condition altering influences before they finally hit the ground, with no built in capability of compensating for any of those outside influences.  Bomb patterns could be anywhere from a few feet to hundreds of feet off of the intended target, which often resulted in unintended damage [what we refer to today as "collateral damage"] to nearby ground features.  If those "ground features" included American or Allied Troops the results could be catastrophic, and sometimes were.

GEM

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3 minutes ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

For those too young and without the inclination to study military history:

In WWII the Americans engaged in High Altitude Bombing using the Norden Bombsight as the aiming device.  The Norden was good enough to be used well into the Vietnam Era.  Unfortunately, WWII ordinance wasn't and bombs dropped from high altitude were subject to all the weather condition altering influences before they finally hit the ground, with no built in capability of compensating for any of those outside influences.  Bomb patterns could be anywhere from a few feet to hundreds of feet off of the intended target, which often resulted in unintended damage [what we refer to today as "collateral damage"] to nearby ground features.  If those "ground features" included American or Allied Troops the results could be catastrophic, and sometimes were.

GEM

There were also a few cases after the D-Day landings where the ops plan had the aircraft flying perpendicularly over the allied lines from the west with instructions to hit troops on the Eastern side of the line, however for some unknown reason the American air commanders decided to fly parallel to the lines and proceeded to bomb the wrong side.

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44 minutes ago, ratsmitglied said:

There were also a few cases after the D-Day landings where the ops plan had the aircraft flying perpendicularly over the allied lines from the west with instructions to hit troops on the Eastern side of the line, however for some unknown reason the American air commanders decided to fly parallel to the lines and proceeded to bomb the wrong side.

The technical description of which is described by the acronym SNAFU.

Not to make light of the situation, when communications breakdowns occur in battle situations the results all too frequently result in the sort of unfortunate and tragic situations as described above.

There is a parallel in the business world, fortunately, the results of such communication breakdowns rarely result in loss of life but can result in large sums of money being lost and occasionally employment situations as well.

GEM

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2 minutes ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

The technical description of which is described by the acronym SNAFU.

Not to make light of the situation, when communications breakdowns occur in battle situations the results all too frequently result in the sort of unfortunate and tragic situations as described above.

There is a parallel in the business world, fortunately, the results of such communication breakdowns rarely result in loss of life but can result in large sums of money being lost and occasionally employment situations as well.

GEM

Very true

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 Y'know, up until this week I had no idea that 03661 Zeldriia was based on a Clyde Caldwell illustration...

 

 

 

On 3/3/2020 at 6:49 PM, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

So then, nothing much has changed, is what you are saying? ::D:

 

 

 Oh, no, I'm much better now....   ::D:

 

(I have the release papers to prove it.)

 

 

 

17 hours ago, Marvin said:

 

 I just ran across this, which I kinda need turned into a mini.

 

  Actually, that wouldn't be a particularly hard thing to cobble together, although it'd take about four or five other figures to do it...

 

 

 

12 hours ago, klarg1 said:

 

...and he has a hat.

 

Yes.

Yes, I do.

<evil chuckle>

 

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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1 hour ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

There is a parallel in the business world, fortunately, the results of such communication breakdowns rarely result in loss of life but can result in large sums of money being lost and occasionally employment situations as well.

Still dealing with the aftermath of that lack of communication aspect at work, two weeks after the restructuring.  So many customers have the same thing: where's our rep? What happened to our rep? Why didn't anyone tell us about this... And it just goes on, and on.

 

Meanwhile, I'm trying to deal with the workload I have, and operating in an area I don't know, and it isn't exactly working out - then again, having customers that would be 15-20 minutes take an hour because they won't let me do anything, and won't stop asking the same four questions over and over... Isn't helping.

 

Im looking forward to sitting down with a coffee ans gaming with hubby tonight. Tomorrow will be another battle at work - one I hope I can at least gain some ground on, because I'm now at the "screw it, I'm not doing any more overtime" point. 

 

 

...If higher ups had actually sent notice to customers about various changes, this would have gone over a LOT smoother.  Still sucks we effectively lost something like eight people in our branch too. 

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11 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

Still dealing with the aftermath of that lack of communication aspect at work, two weeks after the restructuring.  So many customers have the same thing: where's our rep? What happened to our rep? Why didn't anyone tell us about this... And it just goes on, and on.

 

Meanwhile, I'm trying to deal with the workload I have, and operating in an area I don't know, and it isn't exactly working out - then again, having customers that would be 15-20 minutes take an hour because they won't let me do anything, and won't stop asking the same four questions over and over... Isn't helping.

 

Im looking forward to sitting down with a coffee ans gaming with hubby tonight. Tomorrow will be another battle at work - one I hope I can at least gain some ground on, because I'm now at the "screw it, I'm not doing any more overtime" point. 

 

 

...If higher ups had actually sent notice to customers about various changes, this would have gone over a LOT smoother.  Still sucks we effectively lost something like eight people in our branch too. 

Breakdowns in communication, generally caused by a Failure To Communicate, have been one of my chief bugaboos for the last circa 5 decades.

GEM

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@Glitterwolf congrats Buddy! Your new home is beautiful!

And the WW2 naval system of nnumbering aircraft was a thing dreamt up by someone with WAY too much time on their hands, it went like this: First letter described its role: F-fighter, T-torpedo, S-scout etc. The first number was how many aircraft bought from a company, second letter was the Company itself, and the second number was which modification to the aricraft . So, The F4F Wildcat was a Fighter, the 4th aircraft design by F [Grumman] and the F4U was a fighter, the 4th aircraft bought from U [Vought].

And on the comment we need more Corsairs...it's nice to be appreciated!

 

Oh, I forgot, they would also at whim, Use multiple letters, the TBF Avenger Torpedo, Bomber, F Grumman,etc

Edited by Corsair
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40 minutes ago, Corsair said:

@Glitterwolf congrats Buddy! Your new home is beautiful!

And the WW2 naval system of nnumbering aircraft was a thing dreamt up by someone with WAY too much time on their hands, it went like this: First letter described its role: F-fighter, T-torpedo, S-scout etc. The first number was how many aircraft bought from a company, second letter was the Company itself, and the second number was which modification to the aricraft . So, The F4F Wildcat was a Fighter, the 4th aircraft design by F [Grumman] and the F4U was a fighter, the 4th aircraft bought from U [Vought].

And on the comment we need more Corsairs...it's nice to be appreciated!

 

Oh, I forgot, they would also at whim, Use multiple letters, the TBF Avenger Torpedo, Bomber, F Grumman,etc

yeah, the US Naval numbering system was nuts.

the other bit you missed is that the first aircraft from a company wasn't numbered, and you had suffix numbers for variant - e.g. the FG-1 Corsair was a Corsair built by a different company. The Current (and USAF/USAAF) numbering system at least makes more sense in that respect (and apparently the numbers are meant to be sequential for type, but some things are out of whack...as they restarted the series in 1962)

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11 hours ago, PaganMegan said:

Whoops, I don't think I was supposed to open that box.

 

A hard drive that will fit my computer, won't fit Grump's cludgy old laptop, and my birthday is coming up.

 

And a tradition of one practical gift and one frivolous gift.

 

And little stuff, but a hard drive isn't little stuff.

 

Come on, it's a month and a half til my birthday, how was I supposed to know?!

 

I had to sign for it, so I opened it.

 

Heading out for a painting lunch with Grump, so I will let him know.

Not as bad as Megan feared - it was going to be an early birthday gift anyway. ::): She just missed out on my nifty gift wrapping skill. (I could not bring my self to type 'Leet' "Mad' or 'Skillz', thank god....

 

And I picked up the Reaper order she was expecting, on my way home. (Why she opened the box - she was expecting UPS, it was UPS, it was just the wrong UPS package.)

 

***

 

The kids have learned that weresharks in The Razor Coast are tough as nails - and almost lost two PCs, who may have contracted lycanthropy from the bites. They were trying to rescue a young girl when she changed on them.

 

The Auld Grump

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