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Randomness XVI: Brains versus Bleach - an Epic Rap Battle in Iambic Pentameter.


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3 hours ago, LittleBluberry said:

My kids' school district just closed starting tomorrow.  School is supposed to switch to online only.  Hopefully this will only be a few days.  :down:

 

I'm so sorry, that's rough. :down:

 

MrBoot's work has been keeping a close eye on things and has been encouraging those who can telework to do so, hold meetings via skype when possible (especially large ones), and for the love of all that's holy, STAY HOME IF YOU'RE ILL. 

 

Seems to be a general feeling of "when" rather than "if" there will be spread of the virus in WA state, at least right now. I'm still not alarmed, though it's been a good opportunity for us to take inventory and make plans for if we had to stay home for two weeks. 

 

I find the fact that people in my area are panic-buying bottled water to be the most baffling part of all of it, to be honest. Like...this isn't a flood or earthquake or something that is likely to disrupt plumbing. Your faucet will still work just fine.... :huh:

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D 

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12 hours ago, OneBoot said:

Ugh. This whole living life in the daytime thing is totally overrated. Like, how do you people do it all the time? :huh:

 

I'm in the process of attempting to tame my wild and unruly sleep schedule in anticipation of applying for Real Actual work in the next few weeks, which will hopefully lead to a Real Actual job, which will presumably prefer I be awake and at work while the business is actually open, as opposed to, say, 4am. :mellow:

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D 

Good luck with that.  I have been recently failing at it.  Finding myself awake and able to respond in real time to @Glitterwolf quite a lot lately.

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10 hours ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

For those too young and without the inclination to study military history:

In WWII the Americans engaged in High Altitude Bombing using the Norden Bombsight as the aiming device.  The Norden was good enough to be used well into the Vietnam Era.  Unfortunately, WWII ordinance wasn't and bombs dropped from high altitude were subject to all the weather condition altering influences before they finally hit the ground, with no built in capability of compensating for any of those outside influences.  Bomb patterns could be anywhere from a few feet to hundreds of feet off of the intended target, which often resulted in unintended damage [what we refer to today as "collateral damage"] to nearby ground features.  If those "ground features" included American or Allied Troops the results could be catastrophic, and sometimes were.

GEM

 

For better or worse "Blue on Blue" incidents were very common in WW2. Every side did them and they were not publicised or made a fuss about. It was accepted that they were an inevitable part of high intensity combat operations by overstretched forces and the friction that can hardly be avoided in inter-service and inter-national operations.

 

And in WW1, during an advance, if you didn't take about 10% casualties from your own creeping artillery barrage you were not keeping close enough. 

 

7 hours ago, Corsair said:

@Glitterwolf congrats Buddy! Your new home is beautiful!

And the WW2 naval system of nnumbering aircraft was a thing dreamt up by someone with WAY too much time on their hands, it went like this: First letter described its role: F-fighter, T-torpedo, S-scout etc. The first number was how many aircraft bought from a company, second letter was the Company itself, and the second number was which modification to the aricraft . So, The F4F Wildcat was a Fighter, the 4th aircraft design by F [Grumman] and the F4U was a fighter, the 4th aircraft bought from U [Vought].

And on the comment we need more Corsairs...it's nice to be appreciated!

 

Oh, I forgot, they would also at whim, Use multiple letters, the TBF Avenger Torpedo, Bomber, F Grumman,etc

 

If the designation letter for US aircraft aren't bad enough US army equipment is worse. I am perpetually confused by the number of different items designated "M3".

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35 minutes ago, paintybeard said:

 

For better or worse "Blue on Blue" incidents were very common in WW2. Every side did them and they were not publicised or made a fuss about. It was accepted that they were an inevitable part of high intensity combat operations by overstretched forces and the friction that can hardly be avoided in inter-service and inter-national operations.

 

And in WW1, during an advance, if you didn't take about 10% casualties from your own creeping artillery barrage you were not keeping close enough. 

 

 

If the designation letter for US aircraft aren't bad enough US army equipment is worse. I am perpetually confused by the number of different items designated "M3".

Based on what I've read 'friendly fire' incidents have been a staple of warfare since the invention of firearms, and quite probably prior to that, it's just that they are much more obvious from the 20th century onwards

US army equipment designation is a nightmare...it makes sense once you realise that every single piece of equipment at some point will have the same M-number  ::P:

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@Glitterwolf add my congratulations to your successful change of location of the glitterden!

 

Your tree looks like a south American monkey puzzle tree.  It also looks way overgrown for the house and lot.  Do I also see a rhododendron?  Wonder how that got there?  Good luck getting the garden back into shape!  It looks like a really nice place

 

8 hours ago, LittleBluberry said:

It is sucking to be a parent on the Seattle Eastside these days.  I just want to get my oldest daughter through her last year of high school and literally everything has gone wrong for her.  <_<

I sympathize! Mine are through school but suffered much more like my wife dis than I and are still trying to sorry out how to leave the nest (my developing a terminal and chronic illness did not help with that)  I hope things get better for her.  I was one of the rare few who enjoyed high school without it being the highpoint of my life.  

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4 hours ago, paintybeard said:

If the designation letter for US aircraft aren't bad enough US army equipment is worse. I am perpetually confused by the number of different items designated "M3".

 

I was thinking of this myself. Seems likes hundreds if not more things called the M1 to M4 and they didn't like to use names for a long time. It was the british that named all the WW2 tanks. "Go get me an M1 soldier!" "Do you want an old rifle or a modern tank, sir?"

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4 hours ago, paintybeard said:

 

For better or worse "Blue on Blue" incidents were very common in WW2. Every side did them and they were not publicised or made a fuss about. It was accepted that they were an inevitable part of high intensity combat operations by overstretched forces and the friction that can hardly be avoided in inter-service and inter-national operations.

 

And in WW1, during an advance, if you didn't take about 10% casualties from your own creeping artillery barrage you were not keeping close enough. 

 

It's a rational way of looking at things. The only thing that matters is how many casualties, not particularly what caused them.

 

We have come to think (for whatever reason) that inadvertent casualties caused by your own side are somehow worse than intentional casualties caused by the other side.

 

4 hours ago, paintybeard said:

 

If the designation letter for US aircraft aren't bad enough US army equipment is worse. I am perpetually confused by the number of different items designated "M3".

 

Why should it be a problem for a halftrack, a light tank, a medium tank, and a submachine gun (among others) to have the same Mark designation? :rolleyes:

 

3 hours ago, ratsmitglied said:

Based on what I've read 'friendly fire' incidents have been a staple of warfare since the invention of firearms, and quite probably prior to that, it's just that they are much more obvious from the 20th century onwards

 

Early in the ACW, Union and Confederate militia units (which had always bought their own uniforms, sometimes very fanciful uniforms) were effectively indistinguishable except for their flags. And one red, white, and blue flag looks much like another when there isn't much wind and clouds of black-powder smoke are rolling everywhere. This certainly contributed to the Union loss at First Bull Run.

 

3 hours ago, ratsmitglied said:


US army equipment designation is a nightmare...it makes sense once you realise that every single piece of equipment at some point will have the same M-number  ::P:

 

Yeah, the real designation is "Light Tank" (or whatever) followed by a mark number, but the mark number is easier to say so it gets used. And since the replacement cycle for most of the equipment (and the starting point for that numbering system) was quite similar, the marks were very similar. Note that the names we remember for US tanks were not assigned by the US but by the British. Later in the war, the decision was made to skip numbers in each sequence so that there wouldn't be the same replication (at least for armored vehicles).

 

The British, who went through far more tank designs than the US, had their own problems, since they insisted on using names beginning with C for most tanks. (Caernarvon, Centurion, Challenger, Challenger 1, Challenger 2, Charioteer, Chieftain, Churchill, Comet, Conqueror, Conway, Covenanter, Cromwell, Crusader -- not all WWII, of course), and that leaves aside the whole "Tank, Cruiser, Mk. N" thing, which is essentially indistinguishable from US practice.

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11 hours ago, ratsmitglied said:

yeah, the US Naval numbering system was nuts.

the other bit you missed is that the first aircraft from a company wasn't numbered, and you had suffix numbers for variant - e.g. the FG-1 Corsair was a Corsair built by a different company. The Current (and USAF/USAAF) numbering system at least makes more sense in that respect (and apparently the numbers are meant to be sequential for type, but some things are out of whack...as they restarted the series in 1962)

Yup, the FG-1 was built by Goodyear

5 hours ago, paintybeard said:

 

For better or worse "Blue on Blue" incidents were very common in WW2. Every side did them and they were not publicised or made a fuss about. It was accepted that they were an inevitable part of high intensity combat operations by overstretched forces and the friction that can hardly be avoided in inter-service and inter-national operations.

 

And in WW1, during an advance, if you didn't take about 10% casualties from your own creeping artillery barrage you were not keeping close enough. 

 

 

If the designation letter for US aircraft aren't bad enough US army equipment is worse. I am perpetually confused by the number of different items designated "M3".

In WW2 you had the M1 Garand rifle, the M1 Carbine, the M1 Johnson Rifle, and the M1 Tommy gun, I am probably missing at least 1 more. Also in WW1 you had two revolvers called the Model 1917, one by Colt, the other by S&W and they were NOT identical in any way. Yeesh, don't even get me going on how firearm cartridges are named and measured...

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49 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

It's a rational way of looking at things. The only thing that matters is how many casualties, not particularly what caused them.

 

We have come to think (for whatever reason) that inadvertent casualties caused by your own side are somehow worse than intentional casualties caused by the other side.

 

 

 

Total casualties are a very recent mode of thought.  throughout history, the main purpose of warfare (you can put whatever banner you want over it) was do depopulate the other clan so your clan had room to expand and procreate.  More land means more food, more food means more people on your genetic stream.  Nobody really cared about total casualties from the other side until nations significantly waxed over clans and blood ties.  Unfortunately, a lot of people have attached that same clan significance to their nation allowing them to justify losses to the other side while deploring losses to their own, even though it doesnt matter from a genetic standpoint anymore.

 

Humans have some significant sociological issues we still need to work out... We are also still more closely tied to our animal instincts and genetic drives than some of us want to admit.

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7 hours ago, OneBoot said:

Seems to be a general feeling of "when" rather than "if" there will be spread of the virus in WA state, at least right now. I'm still not alarmed, though it's been a good opportunity for us to take inventory and make plans for if we had to stay home for two weeks. 

Since I'm supposed to be headed to your neck of the woods in April, post something if things get bad there, please. 

 

 

7 hours ago, OneBoot said:

I find the fact that people in my area are panic-buying bottled water to be the most baffling part of all of it, to be honest. Like...this isn't a flood or earthquake or something that is likely to disrupt plumbing. Your faucet will still work just fine....

Have you seen what's going on in Australia?  Stores are running out of Toilet Paper due to panic buying. 

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1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

The British, who went through far more tank designs than the US, had their own problems, since they insisted on using names beginning with C for most tanks. (Caernarvon, Centurion, Challenger, Challenger 1, Challenger 2, Charioteer, Chieftain, Churchill, Comet, Conqueror, Conway, Covenanter, Cromwell, Crusader -- not all WWII, of course), and that leaves aside the whole "Tank, Cruiser, Mk. N" thing, which is essentially indistinguishable from US practice.

 

 As an aside to this it isn't surprising that King George VI wasn't entirely happy to have a British  tank (Cromwell) commemorating someone who chopped the head off his (distant) ancestor. And he absolutely refused to allow a warship to be named H.M.S. Cromwell.

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27 minutes ago, Inarah said:

Happy national cheese doodle day, everyone. 

 

And a Happy National Cheese Doodle Day to you too! 

 

In other news, Ticketmaster are a pack of criminals. I just got some early bird priced tickets to a concert for my wife. Had to use their service if I wanted to get them at the special price. Ticketmaster's fees were 87% of the total cost of the tickets. Should have just waited and paid normal prices at the box office this weekend. It may have cost more that way, but at least I'd know the money wasn't going to those crooks. 

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10 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

Since I'm supposed to be headed to your neck of the woods in April, post something if things get bad there, please. 

 

 

Have you seen what's going on in Australia?  Stores are running out of Toilet Paper due to panic buying. 

 

Hand sanitizer sales are up over 600% this month compared to last year.  A friend told me there was none to be found in Minnesota yesterday.  

 

6 minutes ago, Thoramel said:

Ticketmaster's fees were 87% of the total cost of the tickets. Should have just waited and paid normal prices at the box office this weekend. It may have cost more that way, but at least I'd know the money wasn't going to those crooks. 

 

Convenience fees are irritating no matter who charges them.  Ticket scalping places only charge what the law lets them, not that I approve of it. 

 

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