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vicwiz007

All Reaper Plastic "Pre-Primed"?

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17 hours ago, vicwiz007 said:

I would do that because Vallejo seems better overall based on reviews but everyone seems to recommend thinning Vallejo. Only reason they don't recommend that for Reaper is because it's pre-thinned apparently. 

Reaper's paint is slightly thinner out of the bottle than Vallejo, meaning that for basecoat applications it doesn't need any additional thinning.  Once I'm beyond that, I still thin it.

  I've never not thinned Vallejo and got good results.  Also I've had very inconsistent results with Vallejo color to color in performance.

 

I'll also add that I've also never squirted chunky slime on my palette from a Reaper bottle....

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On 8/22/2019 at 3:55 PM, vicwiz007 said:

Thank you for the replies. So what I understand is that they should all behave the same from the plastics section of the website.

 

But Cyradis, what I have seen is that people who try other paints (Vallejo for example) have a very hard time without priming Bones. I have never seen or heard anyone have trouble using the Reaper paint on them. Though I have had trouble with the Blade Steel from the starter kit. I'm guessing there are just some colors from Reaper that aren't good.

 

Metallic paints in general settle faster than typical paints, and need more shaking to fully mix everything back together. If any of the Reaper Bones metallic paints (their previous ones were a mix of good/decent) aren't playing nicely, shake them for another 30-60 seconds and try again. A vortex paint mixer works a treat on them. 

 

While Reaper does say that Bones don't need to be primed, and while I have painted a fair number of both "primed" (with a Reaper Liner color) and unprimed Bones, I nearly always have a better experience with the "primed" minis. 

 

Reaper's Liner paints, while not marketed as primers, do have a slightly different formulation from the rest of their typical paints. Something about them makes them stick very nicely to Bones, and gives a sturdy base to work from. I've used all of the Liner colors over the years, and the only one that sometimes gives less-than-satisfactory results is the Sepia Liner. 

 

I will note also that scrubbing off the mini first, with a drop of dish soap and a good rinse, does lead to optimal results. 

 

If you still prefer priming with regular primer, as long as you use brush-on (NOT any of the aerosol ones! They react with the plastic and stay tacky forever), that's okay too.

EDIT: There are a couple of spray primers that might be okay, but I'm not sure which ones, and in general it's probably safest to not use any aerosol primers. 

 

I hope this is helpful! :) 

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D 

Edited by OneBoot
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I have been testing doing a brief soak of Bones in 91% rubbing alcohol prior to painting, and I have found that quite successful. My impression so far is it works even better than a soap and water scrub, but it's been a limited test so far. Also works for metal and resin.

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27 minutes ago, Wren said:

I have been testing doing a brief soak of Bones in 91% rubbing alcohol prior to painting, and I have found that quite successful. My impression so far is it works even better than a soap and water scrub, but it's been a limited test so far. Also works for metal and resin.

 

I'm beginning to think that much of the hydrophobia problem for Bones is the plasticizer. Since an isopropyl soak seems to remove some of the plasticizer at least from the surface layers of the figure, it would also make sense that it would make paint stick a bit better to the bare plastic.

 

Plus oils are miscible with alcohols (in general), so IPA should also be better at removing oils than a water wash.

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11 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

I'm beginning to think that much of the hydrophobia problem for Bones is the plasticizer. Since an isopropyl soak seems to remove some of the plasticizer at least from the surface layers of the figure, it would also make sense that it would make paint stick a bit better to the bare plastic.

 

Plus oils are miscible with alcohols (in general), so IPA should also be better at removing oils than a water wash.

 

I definitely thought you meant to soak minis in hoppy beer until I looked up to isopropyl. :rolleyes:

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14 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

I definitely thought you meant to soak minis in hoppy beer until I looked up to isopropyl. :rolleyes:

 

If I thought hoppy, bitter beer would work, I'd use it to clean minis. Got to be better than drinking it. :zombie:

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2 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

If I thought hoppy, bitter beer would work, I'd use it to clean minis. Got to be better than drinking it. :zombie:

So true... :lol:

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4 hours ago, Cygnwulf said:

Stout for me, IPA for my minis....

 

Mmm stouts. Most definitely yes.

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On 8/25/2019 at 3:17 PM, Wren said:

I have been testing doing a brief soak of Bones in 91% rubbing alcohol prior to painting, and I have found that quite successful. My impression so far is it works even better than a soap and water scrub, but it's been a limited test so far. Also works for metal and resin.

I sometimes thin the basecoat with rubbing alcohol and that's worked well for me. Goes on like an ink wash. Dries super quick though so watch out for that.

Edited by EvilJames
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On 9/1/2019 at 1:06 AM, EvilJames said:

I sometimes thin the basecoat with rubbing alcohol and that's worked well for me. Goes on like an ink wash. Dries super quick though so watch out for that.

I would like to add that I've only done this with reaper's liners and stylnrez's black primer. Alchohol seems to attack the flesh tones I've tried causing them to gum up a bit and not go on well at all. Haven't experimented with anything else yet.

Edited by EvilJames
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