Jump to content

Technique question - hands on weapons


Recommended Posts

Ok, so there I was, looking at a picture of a mini I'm painting when inspiration hit.

 

I'm going to skip the long explanation of my thought process, would it be a valid and possibly time saving idea when painting a hand on a staff or spear to block the hand colors, use a fairly heavy wash or an ink to go around the hand, giving a wide line, then paint up to the line when doing the weapon?

 

I typically paint the hand, then paint the weapon, then use an ink or a wash to create a break between them, but that sometimes requires touchup on one side or the other as I get the line too wide or uneven.  

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 2
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

29 minutes ago, Bill said:

I'm going to skip the long explanation of my thought process, would it be a valid and possibly time saving idea when painting a hand on a staff or spear to block the hand colors, use a fairly heavy wash or an ink to go around the hand, giving a wide line, then paint up to the line when doing the weapon?

 

Well, the miniature painting cops might show up and jack you up, I suppose. :rolleyes:

 

Seriously, I do something like that in most cases. I prefer to only have to maintain one clean edge on whatever I'm painting, so I don't have to be quite so precise about how much of the brush tip I use. So I paint eyes, then clean up the edges of the eyes with face shadow. And I often paint my lining before I do anything else, so I can establish very narrow line widths easily. 

  • Like 4
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

In some ways, you're describing a type of darklining technique:

 

0. Prep and prime as appropriate.

1. Put a dark line in the transitions between materials (i.e., weapon and hand, coat and shirt, etc.). It can be messy!

2. Paint the topmost material (i.e. the hand, or the outermost later of clothing) all the way to its edge. This should be neatly done, but should be easy because it ends without anything against or above it.

3. Paint the innermost material almost to its edge, getting as close to the border as you want, leaving a thin dark line between the two materials. This requires the most control, as you can't just ran your brush up into the join between the two materials. A more "real" look has thinner dark lines, and a more "cartoony" or "comic book" look has either thicker lines or lines of various weights*.

 

 

*This is pretty subjective, go with what you like.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...