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MaskedCoward

Durability of models

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So today I got my very first order from the Reaper store. I'm quite happy with them, but looking closer it seems two of my metal models have bent, especially staffs and spears. Was able to correct one by risking it, however, I'm unsure on how durable they are in general and what sort of metal they are.
And maybe if it is 'safe' to correct these faults without having a great risk at breaking their parts.

 

Could have a great character story of why they wield such weapon, but that can be another thing for another time.

Bent staff.jpg

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It should be safe to correct that bend. 

Just start at one end and do a little bit at a time as you work your way along it. 

 

It's quite difficult to avoid bends like this. They would have to design the mini in more pieces, for one thing. 

And more pieces usually means more danger of fitment issues.  

 

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Reaper minis are cast in a high-tin-content alloy. You don't want to repeatedly bend it back and forth (which is also true of most metal alloys, of course), but straightening a spear or sword won't usually cause a problem. Though you'll often hear a crackling sound as you bend the metal.

 

If you do break such a weapon (or whatever) and don't think you can easily fix it, contact help@reapermini.com and Reaper should be able to solve your problem.

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Okay, welcome to the place! Over the decadess, metal has traditionally had better detail than plastics, but the newest plastics are getting very good. The softer "Bonesium" minis are great for handling as they are extremely tough but aren't quite as sharp.

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Good to hear that it is not too problematic to fix it and that there is some service if that happens. 

Though living in Norway, it is rather pricy to send stuff in and out of that country, so I might just fix it myself if it so ever breaks. 

But thanks for the feedback! Got myself quite a few models, so I'll be enjoying myself with painting them. Not done it for years, so it shall be fun getting back to it.

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1 minute ago, MaskedCoward said:

Good to hear that it is not too problematic to fix it and that there is some service if that happens. 

Though living in Norway, it is rather pricy to send stuff in and out of that country, so I might just fix it myself if it so ever breaks. 

But thanks for the feedback! Got myself quite a few models, so I'll be enjoying myself with painting them. Not done it for years, so it shall be fun getting back to it.

 

They'll still fix problems for customers outside the US, no extra shipping fee (unless cross-ocean changes that). They have done so for me in Canada, and shipping just went up to get here despite being neighbors.

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7 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

 

They'll still fix problems for customers outside the US, no extra shipping fee (unless cross-ocean changes that). They have done so for me in Canada, and shipping just went up to get here despite being neighbors.

 

Got mine within Europe and I had to pay 30 pound ish(Free shipping because it was over 45 EUR in total)  Norway upped the toll due to people ordering a lot of cheap things from china.

 

 

Though perhaps another question while this topic got some attention. 

Been hearing that reaper figures are pre-primed. Is that true or am I better off priming them all? Got some bone and some metal.

Edited by MaskedCoward
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Okay, the Reaper minis are not pre-primed. Use acrylics ONLY to prime on the Bones plastics as enamels will not dry properly. Once they are primed, you can use any paint you wish. If you get one that won't cure, soak it in a pine based cleaner over night and it will scrub right off.

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7 minutes ago, MaskedCoward said:

Though perhaps another question while this topic got some attention. 

Been hearing that reaper figures are pre-primed. Is that true or am I better off priming them all? Got some bone and some metal.

Reaper miniatures do not come pre-primed.  I'm guessing you might have heard something slightly different though - miniatures from the Bones line do not need to be primed, just washed to remove any reaidiaul mold release.  Some still prime their Bones miniatures, but it is optional. 

 

The first coat of paint on a Bones mini should not be thinned with water, as the paint will have issues sticking due to the nature of the Bones material (it repels water).  Some use brown or gray liner as their first coat, as it can help bring out the details (make them easier to see). 

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3 minutes ago, MaskedCoward said:

 

Been hearing that reaper figures are pre-primed. Is that true or am I better off priming them all? Got some bone and some metal.

 No Reaper minis are pre-primed. The plastics are paint-ready without primer.

 

Metal and resin* require priming (if you prime such figures usually).

 

Bones and Bones Black can be painted without primer, although the material is pretty hydrophobic, so your first coat shouldn't be thinned with water.

That said, Reaper's liners serve as an excellent brush on primer for Bones, which picks out details and creates a barrier between your paint and the Bones material.

I'll also mention that I painted a bunch of Bones Black figures last weekend, and the material is considerably less hydrophobic than regular Bones.

 

And, as @Corsair says, if you do choose to prime the Reaper Bones/Bones Black, use acrylic primers. Most sprays are bad juju.

 

 

 

 

*Yes, @Doug SundsethSundseth, I'm aware that resin is a type of plastic. I'm using the term to differentiate classes of materials as understood in the hobby. Hush. ::P::rolleyes:

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7 minutes ago, MaskedCoward said:

Been hearing that reaper figures are pre-primed. Is that true or am I better off priming them all? Got some bone and some metal.

 

WIzkids plastics are pre-primed (though not very well cleaned of mold lines). Reaper does not prime their minis.

 

Metals: Use a real metal primer, not just a paint. In the US, I could give you several brands that work pretty well, but I'm not sure what to recommend for Norge.

 

Bones: I recommend either Bones liners (Brown Liner particularly) or Badger Stynylrez primers as a first coat. Unthinned acrylic paints can work, but don't seem to work as well as either of those.

 

Styrene models: Most primers will work.

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Thanks for these tips!

 

I do have a primer which is for acrylic paint which says it works for metal and plastic, so I'm goodie there and it worked fine for my plastic test model which I tried painting on.

But good to hear that they are not pre-primed, but some are ready to be painted on if one does not have a primer. 

I really do appreciate this help here and also how quick you all are at responding!

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You will find this is one of the nicest forums out there. And also, you will find that there are all levels of skill here, from beginners to tabletop to world class competitors.

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26 minutes ago, Corsair said:

You will find this is one of the nicest forums out there. And also, you will find that there are all levels of skill here, from beginners to tabletop to world class competitors.

All this is very true.

If these forums have a weakness, it's that sometimes we are too nice... If you want really detailed, tear-it-down-so-i-can-rebuild-better critiques, you've got to make that very clear, and even then you won't get as much as you might like. If you really want critiques that will make you a better painter, it's a good idea to send PMs to specific folks whose advice you really respect.

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Metal miniatures, regardless of manufacturer, are more likely to have bent thinner parts (eg. swords, staves, horse legs) than plastics. Plastics will bend at a higher temperature (eg. in a hot car) than metal (can bend at room temperature). Most of the time, you only need to carefully bend the metal back (eg. swords, staves) but horse legs may be more difficult. 

 

https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/13192-bending-metal-minis/

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