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Maglok

Primer vs Ink zenethal

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So I tend to prime with airbrush black primer then zenethal with airbrush white primer. Works ok, but sometimes it gives some grainy effect.

 

Now I got this ink, titanium white ink, which I've seen people use to do the zenethal instead. I tried, but it is just way too watery and it.. well the effect is not good and quite slow. The ink took me 5 minutes, the white primer zenethal took me a minute max.

 

48755873887_84ac127bd1_b.jpg

 

You notice how wet the left, ink, picture still is. It is hell to airbrush with the way I am using it. Has anyone got experience with this sort of airbrushing? What am I doing wrong?

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I do that all the time with my airbrush. If your surface is getting grainy then you are to far away from your subject and you have atomized paint literally drying before it gets to the model. Run a little steel wool lightly over it and you can try and remove it. Otherwise strip and do it again. The grainy texture will accentuate as you continue painting.

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Brand of the ink you are using? Liquitex Professional Acrylic Inks and Daler Rowney FW Inks work perfectly for Zenithal priming. It dry instantly and the coverage is excellent.

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@Cicciopiu: I got a few bottles of Daler Rowney indeed. Yet it does not dry at all with my application method. I have seen video of people airbrushing it and it just does not work like that with mine. I am spraying such a watery liquid at the model that I can see the drops being blown over the model. :(

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I have never used ink before, but have had good results doing zenithal with primer. Do you water down the ink for the airbrush at all? If it's getting blown around, you could try lowering the pressure maybe.

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4 hours ago, Maglok said:

@Cicciopiu: I got a few bottles of Daler Rowney indeed. Yet it does not dry at all with my application method. I have seen video of people airbrushing it and it just does not work like that with mine. I am spraying such a watery liquid at the model that I can see the drops being blown over the model. :(

 

What air pressure are you using? Ink shouldn't require much pressure to run through an airbrush.

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I do not delude the ink at all.

I do not know what pressure I use. I am not very experienced with airbrushing. I have a compressor... I would have to check the gauge on it I think.

@Doug Sundseth

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2 minutes ago, Maglok said:

I do not delude the ink at all.

I do not know what pressure I use. I am not very experienced with airbrushing. I have a compressor... I would have to check the gauge on it I think.

@Doug Sundseth

 

FWIW, I normally shoot paint at around 15 PSI (1 atmosphere, plus or minus). When I got the compressor, I think its default was around three times that pressure. If you're seeing what's called "spidering" (paint drops being pushed out from the point where the air stream is hitting the model, leaving behind thin lines of paint), that's usually an indicator that your pressure is too high.

 

I would at least consider running the pressure down to 10 PSI (0.7 bar, 69 kPa, 520 Torr ... good thing SI units are so obvious :poke:) to start with and then adjusting from there.

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I'll back up what Doug is saying. I spray thinned paints at around 10 to 15 psi. This is a good place to start, and work up from here.

 

The heaviest I go is 25-30 psi for spraying Stynlyrez primer from Badger, straight from the bottle. You could thin it, but I find I do not need to, and I love the way it coats already. I cannot recommend this stuff enough, and it's worked great with every material I've tried it on from resin to metal to Bones.

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I had the same problem with my FW Ink once. The issue was I didn't shake it and the pigment had settled. Just like paints, inks apparantly need agitation.

 

Reducing pressure and increasing air should help as well, but if you are getting mostly water it means you are applying too heavily or the ink isn't mixed.

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I am going to look into this tonight when I get back from work. :) Last night I unfortunately fell asleep on the couch immediately and... well didn't have time. :) Thanks for the advice, will let you know.

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Alright! So I am not good at pressure stuff. :)

 

I moved it from low and to the highest. There is no difference in the wateryness of the ink. Though lower pressure does make it go .. well slower you know. :)

 

Here is a screenshot of how it looks (and remember this is one of the options, it goes up to 50 on the black)

 

48765644266_01a3de64a6_o.jpg

 

So I have no clue what a psi is on this, but also the highest and lowest settings still have the same effect. :/

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