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 There's a recent thread here about someone who ordered a 3D-printed mini from a make-your-own-custom-mini website that recently was funded through Kickstarter.

Their software basically mimics the online two-dimensional "character image generators" where you pick and choose from a list of available poses and selections for each bodily location (i.e., torso A + head C + right hand sword + left arm shield, etc.), except using a 3D modeling program with pre-programmed objects rather than 2D images...

It combines the individual elements into a complete program for the 3D printer, prints it out in one of several scales and definitions, and they ship it to you.

 

As I recall, the general consensus was that, in it's current incarnation, the technology was interesting but pretty much still solidly in the stages of its infancy - the quality of the 3D printing on objects of miniature scale (available for a reasonable price, anyway) hadn't yet caught up to the program's ability to model.

 

It'll most likely still be a decade or more before we see cheaply available high-quality 3D print-on-demand as a common business venture.

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Hummmm. Not sure about this. Analogy: While print at home is an option, it is actually usually cheaper to buy books. Economies of scale.

 

I expect something similar with 3D printing. It may become a very commonplace way of obtaining "just that" part, and is sure to partially undermine the "he has a SPECIAL weapon so he's literally ten times the price of his squad-mate" market sector.

 

OTOH the process may end up being inherently simpler than proper binding of a book, which is the major hurdle to print-at-home.

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For FDM (filament + heated bed) printing, I agree that it's not really all that great as far as print quality goes. Plus you get issues with layer separation and it's quite bad at doing overhangs.

 

On the other hand, SLA (resin + laser) printing looks absolutely amazing. I'm looking at a tiny version of the Thinker statue that's every bit as detailed as the Bones mini I have sitting right next to it. I even considered for a time printing all the detailed parts of a mini, and then doing final joining and posing using GS.

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 There's a recent thread here about someone who ordered a 3D-printed mini from a make-your-own-custom-mini website that recently was funded through Kickstarter.

Their software basically mimics the online two-dimensional "character image generators" where you pick and choose from a list of available poses and selections for each bodily location (i.e., torso A + head C + right hand sword + left arm shield, etc.), except using a 3D modeling program with pre-programmed objects rather than 2D images...

It combines the individual elements into a complete program for the 3D printer, prints it out in one of several scales and definitions, and they ship it to you.

 

As I recall, the general consensus was that, in it's current incarnation, the technology was interesting but pretty much still solidly in the stages of its infancy - the quality of the 3D printing on objects of miniature scale (available for a reasonable price, anyway) hadn't yet caught up to the program's ability to model.

 

It'll most likely still be a decade or more before we see cheaply available high-quality 3D print-on-demand as a common business venture.

Though still in its infancy, it may become standard practice in the future.

 

I wouldn't be surprised if in a decade Reaper would have its own line of customizable digital models that you could download and "print" at home (or your favorite retail 3D printer service), or that they would print for you (priced accordingly).

 

Not just for Reaper and miniatures, but the manufacturing industry as a whole, should have a catalog of digital models of parts and pieces. Just think of all the appliances you have at home where only a small part breaks. Instead of the manufacturer keeping the parts in stock until exhausted and the consumer is stuck with buying a new unit; the manufacturer would have a digital file of the model (which most likely already exists in CAD form for all modern tools/appliances) that the user downloads and prints elsewhere. And just like PDFs and many eBooks, it would be a paid service.

 

I see it as an untapped market. Not a money maker per se, but the next step in customer service.

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I think the figurine I saw was done more along the resin laser lines, they combined a glue with colored powder and compared applying that loosely to characteristics of  inkjet printing (haven't seen the process in action personally though). My initial reaction was really impressed, I asked who painted it and my friend said no it was printed. It didn't look much different than other painted figures I have seen done traditionally both in sculpt and paint. The potential for such a tool is vast, I could see not just replacement parts being made but entire machines, perhaps new machines to match the capabilities of the new medium made this way. Who's to say eventually things couldn't be printed in stronger more durable materials than plastics or resin. 

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The new Terminator-style CLIP 3D printers are apparently 10 times the resolution of the traditional "3D Printer".  3D printers are traditionally not really 3D, they're just layered 2D printing.  The new CLIP printers could break the detail barrier.

 

Link to Terminator-goo "CLIP" printer:

 

That said, I agree with others who have said that terrain is already printable.  Thingiverse is full of scale terrain that is interlocking and customizable.  Especially since Dwarven Forge went bonkers, there have been a lot more efforts to make fully interchangable pieces.  The only catch is that they're made of PLA/PVC instead of Bonesium/Dwarvenite.

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I've actually got a 3d printer, and am really going to try printing out part of my ReaperCon entry with it. And while I bought it for the hobby, I've been using it to repair things around the house, and I'm finding more and more uses for it as I have it.

 

I have printed out one mini, but did it at the worst resolution. I really should run one at the best resolution. I really should.

 

That CLIP printer looks cool, too.

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We got a 3D printer at school.  Its fun, but it's an entry level model and the resolution it still not great.  For elementary school kids it's awesome though.  Granted, the day we got it, my principal and I hung out watching it print a plastic shark for like 50 minutes after the school emptied.

 

We were totally like little boys with a new toy :lol:

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I honestly think people are completely underestimating this technology.

 

I used to have a printer that was used a spool and had teeth that dragged it along.

 

Now it's office quality. 

 

Lulu and Drivethru can almost make books/cards/etc... that you would pick up off the shelf at Borders.

 

The ability of the technology to completely change and upgrade itself every 6-18 months is going to take people by storm.

 

In China they are doing far more advanced medical things than we currently are in America (replacing disks in the spine for instance) although we are looking into a lot of bone replacement and limb replacement, far cheaper than ever done before.

 

Within 5 years I say we'll have something that you'll be buy CAD images and customizing those in some software to customize your minis. Hero Forge on a huge level where the cost isn't going to be the mini or even the 'basic' but all the fluff and add ons. "I need more chains and another belt pouch here!"

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On 10/14/2019 at 5:45 PM, ratsmitglied said:

I wouldn't recommend running a resin printer without decent ventilation - some resins have much less of a smell than others, and even with ventilation I'd recommend looking into those resins rather than the 'regular' resins.

 

Apart from that factor I do like my Photon.

That's good to know. I was planning on housing it either at my desk in the dining room, or maybe in the spare bedroom. Still haven't bought one, but that hasn't stopped me from eyeing KSs for STLs.

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1 hour ago, Disciple of Sakura said:

That's good to know. I was planning on housing it either at my desk in the dining room, or maybe in the spare bedroom. Still haven't bought one, but that hasn't stopped me from eyeing KSs for STLs.

I would recommend the spare bedroom rather than in the dining room, then you can at least close it off (and vent out the window)

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