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3D Printing General Discussion (merged)


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40 minutes ago, ratsmitglied said:

All of this, very, very much! I have a very similar process after a print. What I have found with leaving resin in the vat is that capillary action means that the resin actually leaks out of the vat after a few days - and because even if I plan to print in a day or so this doesn't always happen due to other commitments.

 

I have also found with pigmented resins that the pigment settles in the vat - and in fact the only time I've had failed prints in when this has occurred.

 

In terms of resin, most printers will work quite happily with any resin that cures at the right range, so you aren't limited to only the resin made by the manufacturer of the printer. For me this is good because there is a local resin manufacturer that sells suitable resin which means I'm not relying on ebay and aliexpress to get resin - and it's normally here within a week.

Just be careful. There are some resins that even though they cure at the right wavelength, require the higher power output of a laser unit and won’t work on the led light source of the Photon. And it suck having a bottle of high dollar resin sitting on the shelf you can’t use. 

 

Great recommendation on the second vat Gadgetman—- I should get one for my Photon. 

 

Here is a Dalek from Thingiverse I printed on the Photon. One of the first pieces I printed. Probably 2” tall total. I sliced it into e pieces for the print. 

 

AC9408A8-1F5C-489C-9C9E-AADA293DF2DB.jpeg.7e67890ed598070a214a52fde910a657.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

And yet, the distaff side has no problem with nail polish remover that has the full strength version of the volatile elements used in lacquer base paints.

GEM

Could you do some work in progress postings of those?

I think we both supported the same KS and I haven't received the printer I sponsored at the same time yet.  But the printer is very close to production and fulfillment as I write this.

Seems that when you change one spec. a lot of other things have to be rejiggered as well, near ad-infinitum.

GEM

I'll give it a shot.  I don't always think ahead and take pictures but I should be able to manage a running commentary.  Should I keep it in this thread or start a new one?

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I always store my vats in airtight 'tupperware' boxes. (Not really tupperware, but... squarish, with rubber seal) between uses. whether they're full of resin or not. Got to keep the dust out. 

And I've seen the 'leakage' in the bottom of the box.  

 

Please note that resin printers lift the print high enough to 'tear' it off the teflon film while printing, and that this can cause a suction force. 

Printing a cup or other open'topped object doesn't leave a lot of surface area to contact the teflon film, but the suction can be rather damaging, so it's often a good idea to tilt parts slighly and produce a few supports for it.    

 

Printing everything in the exact middle of the vat is a bad idea. Because that will wear out that spot in the teflon so much faster....

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10 hours ago, KruleBear said:

Just be careful. There are some resins that even though they cure at the right wavelength, require the higher power output of a laser unit and won’t work on the led light source of the Photon. And it suck having a bottle of high dollar resin sitting on the shelf you can’t use. 

 

That is very true - the brand I get I get the 'rapid' resin which is designed to print at the lower outputs.

 

Apparently the regular resin for that brand will still cure on a Photon, you just have to have 1min+ for each layer.

 

So the takeaway is to check the printer compatibility BEFORE buying any resin :poke:

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as another "non-technical caveman" I can tell you that FDM (filament) printers (which are all you need for the terrain) are easy enough to operate and ... probably cheaper than the average forumite's pledge for Bones V ;)

 

As far as I know, there is a special price promotion for the Ender 3 right now ...

Edited by Knight of the Dinner Table
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2 hours ago, Knight of the Dinner Table said:

as another "non-technical caveman" I can tell you that FDM (filament) printers (which are all you need for the terrain) are easy enough to operate and ... probably cheaper than the average forumite's pledge for Bones V ;)

 

As far as I know, there is a special price promotion for the Ender 3 right now ...

 

But do those printers print High Quality?

I do not want a print with all the grains visible.

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The higher the quality, the longer the print. With terrain, we might be talking about 20hours plus then. With FDM printers, there will always be some lines visible - which I can live with. I'm not sure resin printers (which start also below $300) can print such big parts and whether that's really viable. I'm quite ok with the terrain I've printed with my Anycubic Mega3 and what I see printed by an Ender looks great, too.

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5 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

 

But do those printers print High Quality?

I do not want a print with all the grains visible.

Have you seen my terrain prints over in my WIP?  They are all with an Ender3 that is at a half decent tune.  I've seen pictures that blow mine away for detail.  But there will always be fine lines on the FDM prints.  Going to finer nozzles reduces them even more but slows the printing down massively.

I'm just waiting until I move to order the sample kit of Badger's new 3D PRIME product.  Sample photos look like it does a great job of filling the layer lines in.  Looking forward to trying that out.

 

Also, got my bowden tube and couplings finally swapped out last night, so back to printing again.

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1 hour ago, Jasper_the_2nd said:

Have you seen my terrain prints over in my WIP?  They are all with an Ender3 that is at a half decent tune.  I've seen pictures that blow mine away for detail.  But there will always be fine lines on the FDM prints.  Going to finer nozzles reduces them even more but slows the printing down massively.

I'm just waiting until I move to order the sample kit of Badger's new 3D PRIME product.  Sample photos look like it does a great job of filling the layer lines in.  Looking forward to trying that out.

 

Also, got my bowden tube and couplings finally swapped out last night, so back to printing again.

 

Since I'm a technical dweeb....is this a user friendly thing?

I mean I'm bad at adjusting stuff, cleaning stuff from machinery or replacing parts.

 

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So what I just built is an Ender 3 pro.  If you can handle assembling Ikea furniture you should be able to handle assembling this (as long as some one at the factory doesn't elf up the cable routing like on mine).  Especially if you watch the Fat Dragon Games YouTube video on assembly.  You really only need to use the provided wrenches and Allen keys.

Most of the files from printing dont seem to require much of anything.  Download it to the slicer program, export it to the micro SD card and put thebcard in the printer.

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1 hour ago, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

So what I just built is an Ender 3 pro.  If you can handle assembling Ikea furniture you should be able to handle assembling this (as long as some one at the factory doesn't elf up the cable routing like on mine).  Especially if you watch the Fat Dragon Games YouTube video on assembly.  You really only need to use the provided wrenches and Allen keys.

Most of the files from printing dont seem to require much of anything.  Download it to the slicer program, export it to the micro SD card and put thebcard in the printer.

 

IIRC the Ender3 comes with all the tools required to build it (well, mine did)...so you don't even need them! Another thing not to elf up is the belt tension...but at least this is easy to fix on the Ender compared to some other printers!

 

Otherwise it is pretty much as above (once you've got it set up) - even Resin printers aren't much more than that once they're set up

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1 hour ago, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

So what I just built is an Ender 3 pro.  If you can handle assembling Ikea furniture you should be able to handle assembling this (as long as some one at the factory doesn't elf up the cable routing like on mine).  Especially if you watch the Fat Dragon Games YouTube video on assembly.  You really only need to use the provided wrenches and Allen keys.

Most of the files from printing dont seem to require much of anything.  Download it to the slicer program, export it to the micro SD card and put thebcard in the printer.

Yep.  Thanks to Tom @ FDG, life is so much easier.  He does nice simple videos that cover basic assembly, trouble shooting, recommended upgrades (there are a few).  If you print his stuff (which is excellent) he even provides Cura (that's one of the slicer programs) profiles specifically customized for the ender 3 and his models, which he's optimized for his stuff.

So basically if you can turn a wrench and an allen wrench, and use a pair of cutters without hurting yourself , you can probably handle an Ender 3.  I do highly recommend getting a glass build plate (installation of which is using a couple of binder clips to hold it in place) right off the bat.  Other upgrades and the like can be done over time and none are too tricky.  I did the Bowden tube and couplers replacement last night while playing D&D via FB chat, in between dice rolls.  Hardest thing I've found to do with the Ender 3 is to replace the nozzle, because the head should be hot while you do it and brass transfers heat pretty quick!!  And if I had a 6mm socket handy (I think that's the size) like Tom recommends, it wouldn't be an issue. (but all my sockets are packed in another province right now)


 

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Yeah, a glass build-plate is nice. Very nice. 

I rub mine with cheap glue-sticks before heating them, to help prints stick even better. 

I didn't use binder clips on my WanHao i3 (not that much different from an Ender 3, possibly somewhat weaker frame), but stuck it on using 0.15mm thick adhesive thermal pads. 

 

As for setup time...   

My Overlord Pro was 'ready to print'. Just unpack, fastend the glass plate with clips, connect power, switch it on, start heating it, and feed in filament. 

 

The WanHao took a bit of setup, squaring the frame and levelling everything. It probably took about an hour all in all for a rough job. 

Then I spent a couple of days printing parts to get it to where it needed to be...    

(The i3 needs to have the vertical part braced off, and really helps with proper fan ducts around the hot end or it won't 'bridge' properly.  )

 

I reccommend checking on Thingiverse for a user group, and possible enhancements. 

 

My Bean Resin printer was 'unpack, switch on, fill vat with resin, start printing'.   

 

Resin printers usually only have one moving axis, and on those I've seen, it's usually pretty sturdy, so shouldn't need any adjustment. 

Adjusting the build plate on my Bean is done by lowering it to the bottom of the vat, loosening a set of screws and tightening them again. 

 

The only 'difficult' job is to replace the teflon film that's the bottom of the resin vat, and even that isn't all that difficult.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIAVl5Udqqk

And since they now have a rubber gasket to place under the aluminium frame, you can skip the silicone sealant mess, and won't have to wait until it dries to use it again. 

 

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18 hours ago, ratsmitglied said:

 

IIRC the Ender3 comes with all the tools required to build it (well, mine did)...so you don't even need them! Another thing not to elf up is the belt tension...but at least this is easy to fix on the Ender compared to some other printers!

 

Otherwise it is pretty much as above (once you've got it set up) - even Resin printers aren't much more than that once they're set up

Yep.  End of my first paragraph I said the tools were included.  Not the tool I needed to get to the control board to rewire it though.  Last night before bed I printed one of the Fat Dragon Games Dragon Tiles.  1.25 hour print time.  Looked ok when I glanced at it while getting ready for work this morning.  Going totake a bunch or print time to get a set big enough to be useful in a game.  Luckily onve it starts I should just be able to leave it to run. So I'll most likely set up some prints that I can run ober night and while I'm at work.  I also figured out how run more than one copy of an item at a time (copy item command, go figure) so that will be the next order of business.

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