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6 hours ago, Rahz said:

 

 

I will share some early prints after the 25th.  

 

 

Don't be surprised if your first couple of prints fail, but also don't be surprised if they are an outstanding success and then your next ones are a massive fail.

 

One thing to remember is to make sure you have enough  (and strong enough) supports, the only prints I've had fail on my photon recently have been because the supports weren't strong enough to pull the model off the FEP sheet and the supports broke.

 

Good luck with the printing :-)

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One big tip with resin printers is to place the object at an agle to the printbed.  Just a few degrees is enough usually 

What it does is reduce the area in contact with the FEP(or whatever) plastic film in the resin tray and therefore reduce the force needed to 'break free' when it lifts the print.  

It's also a good idea to place them in different positions on the print bed so that the film wears more evenly,   

(Actually, you want to stuff it as full as you can get it becaue print height is what controls print time, not mass of the printed objects) 

Some Slicers even allows you to add a 'second print bed' structure so that you can stack objects vertically, also. Handy if one object is extra long and will cause a long print time. If the preview looks like a BORG cube you're doing it right...  

 

Always make certain there's enough resin in the vat. 'Enough to cover the bottom' is never ever enough. You want it to flow properly to fill the void when the printed object is lifted to the next level.

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As stated above, I opted for the EPAX X1.  It is sitting under the tree...waiting.

 

I have not ordered any resin yet, as I figured I'd get some later this week so it arrives just in time.  I also need to get/make a UV cure oven for the post print work.

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4 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

One big tip with resin printers is to place the object at an agle to the printbed.  Just a few degrees is enough usually 

What it does is reduce the area in contact with the FEP(or whatever) plastic film in the resin tray and therefore reduce the force needed to 'break free' when it lifts the print.  

It's also a good idea to place them in different positions on the print bed so that the film wears more evenly,   

(Actually, you want to stuff it as full as you can get it becaue print height is what controls print time, not mass of the printed objects) 

Some Slicers even allows you to add a 'second print bed' structure so that you can stack objects vertically, also. Handy if one object is extra long and will cause a long print time. If the preview looks like a BORG cube you're doing it right...  

 

Always make certain there's enough resin in the vat. 'Enough to cover the bottom' is never ever enough. You want it to flow properly to fill the void when the printed object is lifted to the next level.

I find that the angle depends on the item being printed

 

For example, with my sphinx I print the wings and tail vertically from the print bed, as they are quite thin pieces, so having them vertically reduces the contact area, but because they're thin they also don't have too much grip on the FEP, changing the angle may increase the number of required supports which may cause some other issues.

 

The body, on the other hand, I print at an angle, as it allows me to increase the number of supports as well as reducing the print area. For a robed figure which can be printed support free I'll simply lift it off the print bed and print vertically, as if we change the angle we actually increase the surface area for some layers (unless we hollow the model).

 

If I hollow a model I make sure it's lifted off the print bed and that there are holes in the bottom of the model (to allow air to get in so ensuring a suction grab doesn't occur), but also at the top-most point to allow resin to drain out. Some people say that the second hole isn't necessary (you just need to wash the interior of the model out), but because the slicer I use allows me to create a plug directly from the hole it is easy enough for me to work with.

 

Even if the slicer doesn't include the ability to create a second print bed it's still possible to embed models to print in multiple layers, you just have to be careful with placing your supports.

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3 minutes ago, ratsmitglied said:

I find that the angle depends on the item being printed

 

For example, with my sphinx I print the wings and tail vertically from the print bed, as they are quite thin pieces, so having them vertically reduces the contact area, but because they're thin they also don't have too much grip on the FEP, changing the angle may increase the number of required supports which may cause some other issues.

 

 

Yeah, I could have been a bit clearer on the matter.   

2025802_tiny.jpg.d853ce2b366783dac9b441c2ab1176c2.jpg

 

This is a brace for the Y-axis idler wheel on my WanHao i3 printer. 

(it replaces a rather flimsy metal bracket)

 

Printing it with one of the large, flat surfaces facing directly down definitely will mess it up because the continuous flat area being printed will have so much adhesion that the print will be ruined. A least that's what happens on my Bean. 


Give it a bit of a nudge, maybe 15degrees, and add a couple of supports, and it prints without issues at all. 

 

Maybe I should have printed it on the WanHao before I pulled it apart, but I was also trying to test the 'Tough' resin. 

Also, I was aftaid that the belt on the Y axis would break before it could print it. It was pretty much in tatters after the old bracket started bending, and the belt rode up on the side of the idler. (Actually, two flanged bearings. And that flange was never designed for this job. )

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3 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

 

Yeah, I could have been a bit clearer on the matter.   

2025802_tiny.jpg.d853ce2b366783dac9b441c2ab1176c2.jpg

 

Printing it with one of the large, flat surfaces facing directly down definitely will mess it up because the continuous flat area being printed will have so much adhesion that the print will be ruined. A least that's what happens on my Bean. 


Give it a bit of a nudge, maybe 15degrees, and add a couple of supports, and it prints without issues at all. 

 

 

Perfect example :-)

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On 12/13/2019 at 8:41 AM, Rahz said:

my daughter offered to ask Santa for one since Santa doesn't give gifts to parents.  :wub: 

so much aawwww there.  

 

So, about a month in to my Anycubic Photon and a whole half liter of anycubic grey resin in, and I've a few developing thoughts.
While I've not had too much issue with things not sticking to the build plate, I'm still considering getting one of the Epax non-FEP films to try.  supposedly, because it's air permeable, it reduces the impact of suction forces and  helps to prevent pulling things loose from your plate.

 

The smell is an issue.  I don't mind it so much but it gives Mrs Wulf headaches and that meant I needed to take action.  I found and added a mod that ducts the build area fan out through a 3m 6001 VOC filter, that did wonders for the smell while a print is in process.  (took a 4 hour print for the duct and another 3 for the adapter but I was able to put other stuff on the plate on the second one.)  The filters come in a 2 pack, so I have a spare for later.   I still need to do the fan upgrade, but there's enough negative pressure in the build area with the door down that the smell isn't escaping during a print.  I also added a small hepa room air cleaner with a charcoal pad to the station to catch the smell that escapes when i open the door and what comes out of my cure box. 

 

I have found that doing an exposure test to start is a very, very good idea.  The one I used can be found here: Resin XP test

Once that was done I found that I actually needed a shorter exposure time than what was in a lot of the documents I found.  (the spreadsheet that was shared with me had anything from a 10 to an 18 for Anycubic grey, several people said 12 so that's what I was using, and I had some decent results, though what I thought were soft details.  I did the exposure test, and the test revealed that 10 was in the middle of best results, so I tried that and things were better.  After that I tried a few test prints up and down and have dialed in on 8-9 seconds for a .05 layer height to be the best sweet spot.

Having the right exposure time made 2 things happen for me. Crisper details, and also I could more easily remove the supports before post cure and not have them explode and go all over the place. (at the 12 second exposure they were very brittle and prone to flying around the room when removing). They're still a bit soft, a little like bones material, at this point, but pop off the model neatly (sometimes a little encouragement from an exacto blade or sprue clippers is needed but not always.)

 

About the only downside to this whole thing I've found is, while the photon is fantastic for detailed prints, it's limited build area is actually making me want to get an FDM printer much more intensely than I did before, lol.

 

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35 minutes ago, Cygnwulf said:

 

About the only downside to this whole thing I've found is, while the photon is fantastic for detailed prints, it's limited build area is actually making me want to get an FDM printer much more intensely than I did before, lol.


Well, you can’t have just one!

 

But seriously, different tools for different jobs.

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2 hours ago, Pegazus said:

 

But seriously, different tools for different jobs.

I totally get that, which was why I went with resin instead of fdm. At the time, the things I was most wanting to make were best in Resin.  but now that' I've stuck a toe in the rabbithole....

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3 hours ago, Cygnwulf said:

so much aawwww there.  

I agree and I'm running with it.  It's going to get wrapped up for my daughter with a second layer of wrapping and a note for her to give it to dad.  I'm so looking forward to Xmas morning.  

 

Many thanks for your thoughts.  :winkthumbs:

I know it's going to be some trail and error and am fully prepared to throw out a few prints as I settle into a routine of sorts.  I sprayed all kids of paper and styrene sheets with paint with my airbrush before I even started on models, just to get a feel for it.  Practice is never wasted!  

 

 

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Curious about resin smell. Most likely going to set up my resin printer in the garage.  I just need to acquire a base (ie sturdy, old, solid night stand) but I was curious about the smell & the resin itself. I'll prob use the maker's brand (Anycubic), at least at the start, but how bad is the smell? Second, is the smell (fumes) combustible?  I ask cause our furnace is out in the garage & it'll be kinda close to where I'm setting the printer up.

 

Looking forward to the day having both resin & FDM printers going. I've even shown restraint in just keeping the resin printer in the shipping box too!

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