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So what I just built is an Ender 3 pro.  If you can handle assembling Ikea furniture you should be able to handle assembling this (as long as some one at the factory doesn't elf up the cable routing like on mine).  Especially if you watch the Fat Dragon Games YouTube video on assembly.  You really only need to use the provided wrenches and Allen keys.

Most of the files from printing dont seem to require much of anything.  Download it to the slicer program, export it to the micro SD card and put thebcard in the printer.

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1 hour ago, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

So what I just built is an Ender 3 pro.  If you can handle assembling Ikea furniture you should be able to handle assembling this (as long as some one at the factory doesn't elf up the cable routing like on mine).  Especially if you watch the Fat Dragon Games YouTube video on assembly.  You really only need to use the provided wrenches and Allen keys.

Most of the files from printing dont seem to require much of anything.  Download it to the slicer program, export it to the micro SD card and put thebcard in the printer.

 

IIRC the Ender3 comes with all the tools required to build it (well, mine did)...so you don't even need them! Another thing not to elf up is the belt tension...but at least this is easy to fix on the Ender compared to some other printers!

 

Otherwise it is pretty much as above (once you've got it set up) - even Resin printers aren't much more than that once they're set up

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1 hour ago, Dilvish the Deliverer said:

So what I just built is an Ender 3 pro.  If you can handle assembling Ikea furniture you should be able to handle assembling this (as long as some one at the factory doesn't elf up the cable routing like on mine).  Especially if you watch the Fat Dragon Games YouTube video on assembly.  You really only need to use the provided wrenches and Allen keys.

Most of the files from printing dont seem to require much of anything.  Download it to the slicer program, export it to the micro SD card and put thebcard in the printer.

Yep.  Thanks to Tom @ FDG, life is so much easier.  He does nice simple videos that cover basic assembly, trouble shooting, recommended upgrades (there are a few).  If you print his stuff (which is excellent) he even provides Cura (that's one of the slicer programs) profiles specifically customized for the ender 3 and his models, which he's optimized for his stuff.

So basically if you can turn a wrench and an allen wrench, and use a pair of cutters without hurting yourself , you can probably handle an Ender 3.  I do highly recommend getting a glass build plate (installation of which is using a couple of binder clips to hold it in place) right off the bat.  Other upgrades and the like can be done over time and none are too tricky.  I did the Bowden tube and couplers replacement last night while playing D&D via FB chat, in between dice rolls.  Hardest thing I've found to do with the Ender 3 is to replace the nozzle, because the head should be hot while you do it and brass transfers heat pretty quick!!  And if I had a 6mm socket handy (I think that's the size) like Tom recommends, it wouldn't be an issue. (but all my sockets are packed in another province right now)


 

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Yeah, a glass build-plate is nice. Very nice. 

I rub mine with cheap glue-sticks before heating them, to help prints stick even better. 

I didn't use binder clips on my WanHao i3 (not that much different from an Ender 3, possibly somewhat weaker frame), but stuck it on using 0.15mm thick adhesive thermal pads. 

 

As for setup time...   

My Overlord Pro was 'ready to print'. Just unpack, fastend the glass plate with clips, connect power, switch it on, start heating it, and feed in filament. 

 

The WanHao took a bit of setup, squaring the frame and levelling everything. It probably took about an hour all in all for a rough job. 

Then I spent a couple of days printing parts to get it to where it needed to be...    

(The i3 needs to have the vertical part braced off, and really helps with proper fan ducts around the hot end or it won't 'bridge' properly.  )

 

I reccommend checking on Thingiverse for a user group, and possible enhancements. 

 

My Bean Resin printer was 'unpack, switch on, fill vat with resin, start printing'.   

 

Resin printers usually only have one moving axis, and on those I've seen, it's usually pretty sturdy, so shouldn't need any adjustment. 

Adjusting the build plate on my Bean is done by lowering it to the bottom of the vat, loosening a set of screws and tightening them again. 

 

The only 'difficult' job is to replace the teflon film that's the bottom of the resin vat, and even that isn't all that difficult.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIAVl5Udqqk

And since they now have a rubber gasket to place under the aluminium frame, you can skip the silicone sealant mess, and won't have to wait until it dries to use it again. 

 

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18 hours ago, ratsmitglied said:

 

IIRC the Ender3 comes with all the tools required to build it (well, mine did)...so you don't even need them! Another thing not to elf up is the belt tension...but at least this is easy to fix on the Ender compared to some other printers!

 

Otherwise it is pretty much as above (once you've got it set up) - even Resin printers aren't much more than that once they're set up

Yep.  End of my first paragraph I said the tools were included.  Not the tool I needed to get to the control board to rewire it though.  Last night before bed I printed one of the Fat Dragon Games Dragon Tiles.  1.25 hour print time.  Looked ok when I glanced at it while getting ready for work this morning.  Going totake a bunch or print time to get a set big enough to be useful in a game.  Luckily onve it starts I should just be able to leave it to run. So I'll most likely set up some prints that I can run ober night and while I'm at work.  I also figured out how run more than one copy of an item at a time (copy item command, go figure) so that will be the next order of business.

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Just in case someone actually have $4700 burning a hole in their pockets...

 

There's a 3D printer project over on Kickstarter right now... that can print electronics...   

Not 'print tracks and pits for someone to drop components into', but real components. You want a transistor somewhere, it makes a transistor there.

It has 8(!) nozzles, and 5 or 6 of those are reserved for special materials. The last ones are for general purpose materials such as PLA. 

 

Not bothering to create a topic for it in the Kickstarter area, because at that prize... Not even I can come up with a valid reason to buy in. 

(It costs 2 or 3 times what my car is worth... )

 

 

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I posted earlier about the Starship IV Kickstarter in the KS section. I loved dealing with them on their last effort and am super stoked about this one.

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Very seriously looking at the Elegoo Mars myself.  Sooon...  Wife has given provisional approval, but there a couple things that need $$$ around the house first.  Plus, there's apparently this Reaper kickstarter happening at some point that may eat up some of my fun cash.  ::P:

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26 minutes ago, Rahz said:

Very seriously looking at the Elegoo Mars myself.  Sooon...  Wife has given provisional approval, but there a couple things that need $$$ around the house first.  Plus, there's apparently this Reaper kickstarter happening at some point that may eat up some of my fun cash.  ::P:

 

That looks like a decent printer for a pretty low price.  

There may be a few issues with it, particularly on the levelling, according to a comment on the River Site. 

 

The good news is that they seem to be responsive to questions and actually deliver some support.   

And they have ChituBox slicing SW configured for it. 

(My Bean has a poor Java-based slicer built into the onboard SW and webserver, and they sell FormWare, a $200 SW package. Probably going to switch to ChituBox myself)

 

A couple of tips;

1. Get replacement films at the same time.

2. Only one or two types/colours of Resin.

3. Download ChituBox and install now. Get to know the program and all the functions before ou get the printer. Particularly hollowing and support functions.

4. You will want a post curing UV light. You may be able to find a generic lamp, or a nail dryer that works in the correct wavelengths. 

 

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2 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

 

That looks like a decent printer for a pretty low price.  

There may be a few issues with it, particularly on the levelling, according to a comment on the River Site. 

 

The good news is that they seem to be responsive to questions and actually deliver some support.   

And they have ChituBox slicing SW configured for it. 

(My Bean has a poor Java-based slicer built into the onboard SW and webserver, and they sell FormWare, a $200 SW package. Probably going to switch to ChituBox myself)

 

A couple of tips;

1. Get replacement films at the same time.

2. Only one or two types/colours of Resin.

3. Download ChituBox and install now. Get to know the program and all the functions before ou get the printer. Particularly hollowing and support functions.

4. You will want a post curing UV light. You may be able to find a generic lamp, or a nail dryer that works in the correct wavelengths. 

 

 

Very much appreciate the tips, thank you. 

My wife has already inquired about the nail dryer on my amazon wishlist... I think I raised some strange questions for a few minutes there.  I'm already youtubing tips and such and the extra films was mentioned in one of them. 

 

As soon as work calms down, ChituBox and I have a date where I hope we will become very very intimate with one another...  :wub:

 

 

 

 

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AnyCubic is running a sale right now (less than a day left) on the Photon and Photon S. Is the Photon S significantly better than the Photon? (During the sale, the price difference is $140 US.)

 

I have as yet been unable to parse the differences on their website.

 

For reference, I consider quality of life upgrades to be significant for tools that I'm going to be spending time with, so if it's notably easier to use, or more robust, or has better air filtration, or whatever, that might be worth $140 to me.

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@Doug Sundseth the big difference is that the S model have two Z-axis linear rails for a more stable positioning instead of the single on the original, and the UV light source has been upgraded to a LED matrix for a more even illumination.   

 

So yeah, I expect it to be a better printer. If the changes are worth it, I have no idea. 

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From

1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

AnyCubic is running a sale right now (less than a day left) on the Photon and Photon S. Is the Photon S significantly better than the Photon? (During the sale, the price difference is $140 US.)

 

I have as yet been unable to parse the differences on their website.

 

For reference, I consider quality of life upgrades to be significant for tools that I'm going to be spending time with, so if it's notably easier to use, or more robust, or has better air filtration, or whatever, that might be worth $140 to me.

From what I've read of reviews etc. it appears that most reviews are saying if buying new then the photon S is worth getting, but if it isn't a big enough improvement to replace a photon if you already have one. That is based on retail price difference rather than on special though. I'm not sure if there is any difference in the filtration (although their website seems to imply that there is)

 

IN terms of ease of use they look pretty much the same, so it is only really that question about filtration - maybe do some digging if you can fine out more

 

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I agree with the above, but it's worth noting that some reviewer have stated the change from a metal enclosure on the Photon to a plastic enclosure on the Photon S detract from the S "feeling" like an upgraded system.

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I was wondering why I was having some first level adhesion issues last night, and there were some issues with a tall thin part on the piece as well....realized that my not bothering to turn on the heat in the apartment is probably the cause.  Was maybe 15C before I went to bed and likely dropped to maybe 10C by morning.  I don't mind the cool but I'm guessing the printer does.
Might play around with slightly higher temps if I get a chance to print again this week.  If not, since we're moving into the new house next week, it might not come up again anyway.

 

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