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JabberwockP

150 miniatures in 75 weeks

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Good call on the brush on primer. I've been meaning to try the badger primer, heard good things about it.

 

Cool travel kit! Don't think I'll have an opportunity to do much painting on this trip, but I'll keep that idea in mind. Most of my stuff is somewhat portable because I don't have a dedicated painting space. I have to port stuff out of my closet to the table every time I want to paint.

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This is an achievable goal, as you work you'll get faster (and also better).  You will have to sacrifice some finesse to get there, by which I mean you probably won't be able to do any time-consuming major fine blending or non-metallic-metals.  This doesn't mean you have to phone it in, though, it just means you should do each mini the best you can in the time you have and don't sweat it if it's less than perfect.  Good is good, if you can live with it then move onto the next.  As you work you'll develop your own methods and tricks for tasks that come up a lot (like painting leather, you're going to be painting a lot of leather).  

 

Beyond that, here are two essential tips to getting there:

 

1.  Paint every chance you have, paint regularly, every day if you can.  You might have to cut out TV or video games or something to do this, so you will probably have to choose which you want to spend time on.  I got up to 150 per year before my rhythm got disrupted by a house fire, and in order to do it I had to commit to painting over any other relaxation (no regrets, tbh, wouldn't go back).  The more you paint, the more you get done.  Depending on how much time these other things currently use the transition might be barely noticeable, or very jarring.  In either case, stick with the miniatures because once you get used to working on them regularly you'll wonder how you ever lived without sitting down to the worktable every day and be so acclimated to the habit it'll be hard for you to break it.  (I suffer intense withdrawal when I go to Reapercon, as it's part pf a larger US trip, and not working on stuff for a month actually makes me feel agitated and ill).  

 

2.  Whatever you paint, having two sets of minis on the table works well.  So for any given "batch", which may or may not be similar figures, I found that 3-4 at a time is my working maximum.  These are the first-string ones, the primaries, what I'm actually working on at the moment.  Behind them are 4-8 more, which are the second-string.  Those are there so that when I have paint out for the primaries, whatever is left over goes on them.  It might be pouch leather, or boots, or skin, or whatever.  The paint's going down the drain anyway, might as well use it.  Even doing these small bits will save time and trouble later, and it's a cumulative gain because when you finish the first string and promote the second string to the front a fair amount of your basic work will be done already.  

 

Both of those break down into a simple premise:  Spend as much time painting as you can, save as much time while painting as you can (while still trying to do a good job, you can paint it all in a day if you want it to look terrible).  If you try to stick to this basic rule, you will reach a satisfying momentum that absolutely belts out good, finished product.  This is also good practice for anyone with a large pewter pile, bones bonanza, or metal mountain - which is why I tried it in the first place.  

 

Good luck, you can do it, and it's very likely you can and will beat your initial goal.  Show no fear, and don't let any gremlins steal your motivation.  If you sit there, you will paint.  If you paint, you'll get stuff done.  

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I forgot to mention one other thing:  what to do about big models.  Big models will disrupt the basic plan, because they're going to take more time.  Two, maybe three weeks (possibly more).  If you're tempted to avoid them in order to keep your pace up, I recommend that you don't avoid them.  Instead, what you can do is "buy" the time slot with other figures.  So if a big dragon is going to eat three weeks up, then you need to pay for it first with 6 extra figures (or whatever your weekly rate is x 3) to fill the gap.  This could be six kobolds, or six rats or something similar.  Six rats can be done in an evening, and counts as six figures done.  That way you won't kill your progress and you'll also get some of the big chonky ones done at the same time.  The key is to do the extra ones first, though, then you won't feel demoralized about the time spent on the big one eating away your progress.  

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Accountability Post:

 

End of week 3: 0/150 miniatures done

 

I would feel bad about this, but life has just gotten in the way. I lost a bunch of the first week due to rain and the inability to prime, and I lost a big chunk due to being out of town for work. I did consider bringing some paint along, but it was wise that I didn't. I wouldn't have had the time or energy.

 

Still, I've got three that are very close to being done. Since I am wanting to put a bit of extra time into their bases, they won't be actually done for a bit. But that is also fine. I have 10 miniatures in the wings ready to be painted, so while I am working on the bases of this current batch, I'll hopefully also be making progress on the next (and prepping the batch after that). I've made a list in my journal of all the things I'd like to get done, and that is way more than 150 models. So I don't have a lack of options.

 

Buglips - you mentioned having small models to get ahead. After I finish with the figures from Unmatched, I want to paint my Mice and Mystics box. I started playing it with my son ages ago, but we stopped for some reason and never returned. I was thinking that I'd really like to get back into that game with him, and figured that it would be more fun with a painted set. Among the enemies are a million little cockroaches (16 I think). It does feel like cheating a little bit... I mean, they are not tiny, but they should be a lot easier to paint up than a regular figure.


One thing I need to be mindful of is that I don't have any Bones miniatures in the queue yet. I need to rectify that soon, I am "supposed" to have 2 done by the end of next week. I decided I want to try out NMM, so I am going to pick out some that look like good candidates for that. I'd like to try both gold and steel/iron. I might even just paint a figure up as if it were a gold or silver statue.

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You might want some brush-on primer (you can use Reaper's brush-on for metals, stynylrez for plastics) handy in case spray conditions are not optimal.  Even if spray is your preference, it might be that not all models you intend to do need it and will do with a quick little something-something primer.  I mean, nobody's gonna come to your house if you miss some days or anything, but if it's a pretty good bet that work will sometimes eat available time then you won't want to lose extra because spray prime conditions are sub-optimal.  (The alternative is that when spray prime conditions are good, spray everything you can like you're a vandal who just discovered a train yard full of clean boxcars)

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