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Rignes

Airbrush Opinion

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So, I'm thinking of diving into getting an air brush.  I'm reading stuff about it and am looking at this kit:

 

Google for "Gocheer Mini Airbrush Kit, Dual-Action Air Brush Pen Gravity Feed Airbrush for Makeup Art Craft Nails Cake Decorating Modeling Tool with Airbrush Cleaning Set"

 

or maybe this kit:

 

Google for "Master Airbrush Multi-purpose Gravity Feed Dual-action Airbrush Kit with 6 Foot Hose and a Powerful 1/5hp Single Piston Quiet Air Compressor "

 

and this hood

 

Google for "Master Airbrush Brand Lighted Portable Hobby Airbrush Spray Booth with LED Lighting for Painting All Art, Cake, Craft, Hobby, Nails, T-Shirts & More. Includes 6 Foot Exhaust Extension Hose"

 

I'm looking for entry level.  I want something decent, not overly expensive but I don't want crap either.

 

I'm planning on using it for indoor priming and zenithal undershading.

 

What do you guys think of the airbrush kit?  Is the brand a known brand and what kind of reputation does it have?  If you have a preferred model (ideally in a kit with a compressor) let me know and why you like it?

 

Thanks.

Edited by Rignes
Remoted links since they are against forum rules. Instead put a phrase you can paste into Google to find what I'm talking about.

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I would skip the first one. There doesn’t appear to be anyway to adjust the air pressure and I seriously doubt that it will generate the PSI you will need to make it of any use.

 

The second one is a better choice. Better compressor that monitors the PSI and it’s adjustable. A compressor with a tank would be better but that one isn’t bad. Master Airbrushes are basically Iwata knockoffs. At some point it will just stop working at that point throw it away. It could happen in three months or three years but the o-ring will fail and it can’t be replaced. It’s not a bad starter outfit to get your feet wet.

 

I would take a look at Badger kits they make a better airbrush and compressor and they are often on sale. That being said I have three airbrushes an Iwata, a Harder Steinbeck and a Badger Renegade. I find myself using the Renegade more and more. Try Chicago Airbrush Supply for starter kits from all three of those companies. If you can find a shop that carries airbrushes go in and actually hold them in your hand. One of the reasons I like the Renegade is it is very comfortable in my hand. I don’t like Grex airbrushes is they are to small to hold comfortably in my big paws. 

 

Like any tool a good one will make life easier while a poor one will lead to frustration and giving up on a useful tool. Opinions will vary a lot, in the end only you can decide what will work best for you.

 

The Booth is okay, but it’s a bit small which can be frustrating at times when you have something big to paint or you are doing a lot of priming. You might have problems with the overhang if you are doing zenithal

Edited by Heisler

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As an aside, you should kill the links, as commerce links aren't allowed on the forum. 

 

With Black Friday coming up, I'd sign up for emails from USA Airbrush Supply and see if a decent deal is offered.

 

My first airbrush was an Iwata, that I bought as a kit.  Cost me somewhere just north of $300, I think, but I'd learned enough about airbrushes at that point to know it was something I'd get my money out of. And it is.  I also purchased a cheap Harbor Freight one, just so I'd have something to beat up.  I can feel the difference - Iwata's is smoother, with a better finish, and heftier.  HF's feels light and cheap (because it is).  HF's is also a bottom-fed brush, so not nearly as useful for painting miniatures, but good for me to practice with on paper to learn spray patterns, what different pressures do, etc.  I learn by doing, and I can learn the basics with a $20 brush, I'd rather risk clogging that one.

 

Compressors are basically all the same - there are some cosmetic differences, but it sure looks like one company makes most of them, slapping different labels on depending on who the customer is.  There's nothing wrong with that, but my focus would be on the airbrush, not the compressor. 

 

 

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Thanks.  I've edited the links out and put in search terms people can paste into Google if they want to find what I'm referring to.

 

If I get one of those kits I'll go for the one with the compressor with the pressure gauge.  If that's a decent compressor then I may just go for the kit with the cheaper airbrush to "learn the ropes".  I've never touched an airbrush in my life so I'm kind of not ready to spend $150 or more on a decent one yet.  I'd be happier to screw up on the cheaper one and then get a "real" airbrush later.  As long as I can keep using the compressor.

 

I know performance will not necessarily be as good with the cheaper one but since my main uses to start are priming, Zenithal undershading, and maybe base coating I'm hoping I can get away with a cheaper one for a while.  I'm thinking kind of like when I started with a brush.  I used cheap synthetics to learn how to use and clean brushes first, then I bought the nice Kolinsky ones. :)

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If you have a Hobby Lobby near you they always have a 40% coupon. You can pick up an Iwata, Badger or Paasche airbrush there and those are all good makers.

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41 minutes ago, Corsair said:

If you have a Hobby Lobby near you they always have a 40% coupon. You can pick up an Iwata, Badger or Paasche airbrush there and those are all good makers.

 

I usually go out of my way to avoid Hobby Lobby because I don't agree with the owners politics but I checked out the website anyway.  Every airbrush I looked at has a note at the bottom that the 40% coupon can't be used on it.

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I agree with the above; you don't want the Gocheer and the Masters is good enough to get you started. That said USA Airbrush Supply always has a Badger starter set [Multi Airbrush Starter System (BA-MASS)] for sale.  It will cost twice what the Masters does but will be better.

 

Your portable hood is something I looked at when I was shopping for an airbrush this time last year.  I decided not to buy it.  While it is better than nothing, and you won't do any better for a commercial setup in that price range, its flow rate is too low to keep paint from escaping back into the room.  By the time the paint gets anywhere they will be paint dust, but it will still be dust floating around the room you're working in.  I also saw some complaints that the LEDs included with it had a blue tint.  It wouldn't be an issue for priming but could be once you move into painting.

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There are 2 schools of thought on starting with any new type of tool. One is buy cheap, learn on it and then replace it. The other is the "Buy once, cry once" train of thought, that spending a bit more up front to get one that will last you is the way to go. Look at which will feel better to you , then decide.

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4 hours ago, Auberon said:

I agree with the above; you don't want the Gocheer and the Masters is good enough to get you started. That said USA Airbrush Supply always has a Badger starter set [Multi Airbrush Starter System (BA-MASS)] for sale.  It will cost twice what the Masters does but will be better.

 

Your portable hood is something I looked at when I was shopping for an airbrush this time last year.  I decided not to buy it.  While it is better than nothing, and you won't do any better for a commercial setup in that price range, its flow rate is too low to keep paint from escaping back into the room.  By the time the paint gets anywhere they will be paint dust, but it will still be dust floating around the room you're working in.  I also saw some complaints that the LEDs included with it had a blue tint.  It wouldn't be an issue for priming but could be once you move into painting.

 

That BA-MASS set looks nice.  I don't know that I'd have any use for the siphon feed gun it comes with but the rest of the accessories seems nice.  I'll have to consider it. I probably won't be pulling the trigger on anything until after the holidays at the earliest in any case.  I just like to research the hell out of things before making a purchase.  Regarding the hood, do you have any other suggestions?  I have a small wood shop and could probably build something with my basic wood working skills but I'm lazy and was kind of hoping to just buy something.

 

I guess I could throw something together with plywood, get some daylight LED strips for the inside and a fan/filter of some sort, there are tons of DIY vids on youtube but like I said, just cuz I can doesn't mean I want to. :P  Again, something to consider.  I imagine I could make my budget stretch further if I did a DIY hood, especially if I have enough scraps around.

 

4 hours ago, Corsair said:

There are 2 schools of thought on starting with any new type of tool. One is buy cheap, learn on it and then replace it. The other is the "Buy once, cry once" train of thought, that spending a bit more up front to get one that will last you is the way to go. Look at which will feel better to you , then decide.

 

That's the approach I usually take.  I was thinking if I go in with a cheaper airbrush, knowing full well what it's capable of (or not capable of), I could risk damaging it while learning to use and clean it and not be too worried if I wreck it.  I can stomach that with at cheaper airbrush, but if I dropped more on it and caused problems due to inexperience I'd be annoyed.  But, like you said, there are advantages to going all in with better stuff.  We'll just have to see how my attitude changes once I get more research done.

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If you decide on 'buy chap to learn on', at least make certain it's the same feed-system as what you expect to use later.   

A siphon-feed airbrush handles differently from a gravity-feed airbrush.

 

Also, if you get a 'starter kit', get one with a god compressor. Because that part can be reused when it's time to upgrade.  

 

Oh, and quick disconnects. You'll understand why they're a necessity the first time you crossthread the hose connector...

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8 hours ago, Rignes said:
13 hours ago, Auberon said:

I agree with the above; you don't want the Gocheer and the Masters is good enough to get you started. That said USA Airbrush Supply always has a Badger starter set [Multi Airbrush Starter System (BA-MASS)] for sale.  It will cost twice what the Masters does but will be better.

 

Your portable hood is something I looked at when I was shopping for an airbrush this time last year.  I decided not to buy it.  While it is better than nothing, and you won't do any better for a commercial setup in that price range, its flow rate is too low to keep paint from escaping back into the room.  By the time the paint gets anywhere they will be paint dust, but it will still be dust floating around the room you're working in.  I also saw some complaints that the LEDs included with it had a blue tint.  It wouldn't be an issue for priming but could be once you move into painting.

 

That BA-MASS set looks nice.  I don't know that I'd have any use for the siphon feed gun it comes with but the rest of the accessories seems nice.  I'll have to consider it. I probably won't be pulling the trigger on anything until after the holidays at the earliest in any case.  I just like to research the hell out of things before making a purchase.  Regarding the hood, do you have any other suggestions?  I have a small wood shop and could probably build something with my basic wood working skills but I'm lazy and was kind of hoping to just buy something.

 

I guess I could throw something together with plywood, get some daylight LED strips for the inside and a fan/filter of some sort, there are tons of DIY vids on youtube but like I said, just cuz I can doesn't mean I want to. :P  Again, something to consider.  I imagine I could make my budget stretch further if I did a DIY hood, especially if I have enough scraps around.

 

I had put together a comparison spreadsheet when I was shopping, but I recently tidied up my documents folder and it appears that was one of the things that got purged.  The problem for all of the larger, more powerful hoods is your budget.  For the price of something like a Paasche HSSB-22-16 you could DIY and save some money.  Just don't use the cheap little bathroom fans if you go that route.  While they were popular in a lot of the videos I watched, they are cheap for a reason and have the same problem as the portable hood you linked to - too low of a flow rate.

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On 11/23/2019 at 5:06 AM, Gadgetman! said:

If you decide on 'buy chap to learn on', at least make certain it's the same feed-system as what you expect to use later.   

A siphon-feed airbrush handles differently from a gravity-feed airbrush.

 

Also, if you get a 'starter kit', get one with a god compressor. Because that part can be reused when it's time to upgrade.  

 

Oh, and quick disconnects. You'll understand why they're a necessity the first time you crossthread the hose connector...

 

haha "god compressor" made me laugh.  Is that a really good compressor, so good it's godlike?  Or is it a special compressor meant for compressing gods into small spaces?

 

(I know you meant "good compressor" but my mind goes strange places at times...)

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Actually, the word 'god' in Norwegian means 'good' in English.

But the word 'gods' as can be found on 'Gods expedition' in Hell, Norway actually means 'freight'.    

(It's on the railway station. Yes, there's a railway station in Hell. it' on the Northbound line from trondheim, and the next stop is the Airport. Yes, you CAN buy a return ticket to Hell...  )

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