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WhiteWulfe

Choosing paint options for a newcomer (aka hubby)

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So, hubby pitched this idea along that of us expanding our painting desks to the point of them not only being larger dimensions (current: 47 1/4" x 23 5/8" and shared between us, new would be each of us having a 59" x 29 1/2" desk), but one other critical thing - not having to share paints between us.  Apparently, a certain fox gets worked up if a paint he's looking for isn't in "the spot he last left it" or something ::P:

 

Anyways, my question is this.  If you were to suggest a combination that were novice friendly, what would you recommend?  Would something semi-crazy like getting him the Reaper Master Series Bones Paint Complete Set + both Dungeon Dweller paint sets (Monster Colors, Dungeon Colors) + both Pathfinder paint sets be overkill for someone who doesn't like mixing colours, AND is somewhat new to painting?  That's 120 bottles of paint.  Maybe add in the CAV paints too, for another 24...?

 

I have a few months to decide on this as I won't be ordering until spring, in order to avoid having to worry about paint freezing in transit.  Any thoughts, ideas, opinions to help out?  This would effectively be a birthday gift for him, but he doesn't quite know it just yet, he only thinks I like the idea of getting him his own paints, and he doesn't check the forums, so there's that too...

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I think even if you're going to go off the deep end I'd start with either the bones or the pathfinder sets and then decide if it made sense to add a full set of the other one. They are all unique colors, but I'm not really sure they are different enough that I'd want everything in both sets. That said, even with all 120 bottles there would be lots of mixing going on for shades and highlights. If you want to avoid that sort of mixing you might want to consider a selection of triads instead.

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I agree that you could definitely choose either the Pathfinder or Bones set and then add some of the most useful MSP.  Those two sets have a different feel, and the Pathfinder ones don't seem to be the style I usually want to go for.  If I was super into Pathfinder I would probably feel the other way.  

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46 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

If you were to suggest a combination that were novice friendly, what would you recommend?  Would something semi-crazy like getting him the Reaper Master Series Bones Paint Complete Set + both Dungeon Dweller paint sets (Monster Colors, Dungeon Colors) + both Pathfinder paint sets be overkill for someone who doesn't like mixing colours, AND is somewhat new to painting?  That's 120 bottles of paint.  Maybe add in the CAV paints too, for another 24...?

 

For a novice?  I would recommend against going all-out.  All that paint can lead to information overload/analysis paralysis.  This then leads to frustration, and giving up the hobby.

 

I would probably start with the Bones, then branch out (depending on his painting style) at a later date.  As another option, work with him to select a "starter kit" of MSP triads.

 

Let him raid your paints from time to time for a couple drops if you have the perfect shade of brown that he doesn't (yet) have.  Easier said than done, I'm sure--kind of like lending dice.

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14 minutes ago, strawhat said:

 

For a novice?  I would recommend against going all-out.  All that paint can lead to information overload/analysis paralysis.  This then leads to frustration, and giving up the hobby.

 

I would probably start with the Bones, then branch out (depending on his painting style) at a later date.  As another option, work with him to select a "starter kit" of MSP triads.

 

Let him raid your paints from time to time for a couple drops if you have the perfect shade of brown that he doesn't (yet) have.  Easier said than done, I'm sure--kind of like lending dice.

 

As a pretty recent beginner, I second all of this!

 

The Bones set is great for beginners because they tend to be higher coverage which is great if he isn’t going to be doing lots of blending and layering right away (what beginner does?).  They have plenty of variety without being overwhelming.

 

Maybe supplement later with a set of the liners, additives, some triads and/or the clears depending on what techniques he grows into.

 

Once he gets started he’ll figure out what’s missing that he wants to add to his collection.  It’s better to build a collection as you realize you need something.

 

I started with a bunch of Bones paints, picked up the full set of Pathfinder paints at ReaperCon, and have not opened the cases yet.  Instead I’ve started buying triads and other specific paints I want.

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I'm going to go against the grain here and suggest instead of buying a whole bunch of new paints, effort should be made into learning color theory and how to mix your own colors from existing shades.

 

There's really no reason to have 18 shades of blue. I say this as someone who has 18 shades of blue from various manufacturers.  Or, I can take a mid blue, add a bit of blue or brown liner to darken it.  I can add a bit of dark liner and a lighter color to desaturate/gray it.  I can add a touch of orange to make it a different gray.  It makes for faster painting, and trains you to use your eyes to see colors instead of color names (the "I have to use leather brown because I'm painting leather" effect).

 

The necessary paints?  Liners, several lighter colors, the clears, and a selection of mid-tones. 

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I would keep it fairly simple and get him the Bones complete set and the box of 'Tone' washes from Army Painter. That stuff is talent in a bottle, especially the Flesh Wash. I wouldn't touch the other AP paints with a ten foot pole though <_< Maybe round it out with the liner and additives triads. 

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6 hours ago, cmorse said:

I think even if you're going to go off the deep end I'd start with either the bones or the pathfinder sets and then decide if it made sense to add a full set of the other one. They are all unique colors, but I'm not really sure they are different enough that I'd want everything in both sets. That said, even with all 120 bottles there would be lots of mixing going on for shades and highlights. If you want to avoid that sort of mixing you might want to consider a selection of triads instead.

I agree there would probably be some mixing, but there's a huge difference between having to mix precisely the shade one wants versus taking something that's 95% of the way there and adding a bit of white or black to nudge it in the general direction.  He's okay with a bit of mixing, but going from scratch is something he's repeatedly said he definitely isn't a fan of.

 

 

6 hours ago, LittleBluberry said:

I agree that you could definitely choose either the Pathfinder or Bones set and then add some of the most useful MSP.  Those two sets have a different feel, and the Pathfinder ones don't seem to be the style I usually want to go for.  If I was super into Pathfinder I would probably feel the other way.  

I'd forgotten about the regular line, partially because of a personal preference for the Bones paints.  I can't remember how hubby reacted to those ones, but I do know out of the ones I have, he does tend to prefer Bones as well, due to their thicker consistency.  We aren't into Pathfinder, but there definitely is something about the reds, blues, and purples in that set that do catch one's attention...  Not to mention the additional metallics.

 

 

5 hours ago, strawhat said:

 

For a novice?  I would recommend against going all-out.  All that paint can lead to information overload/analysis paralysis.  This then leads to frustration, and giving up the hobby.

 

I would probably start with the Bones, then branch out (depending on his painting style) at a later date.  As another option, work with him to select a "starter kit" of MSP triads.

 

Let him raid your paints from time to time for a couple drops if you have the perfect shade of brown that he doesn't (yet) have.  Easier said than done, I'm sure--kind of like lending dice.

Right, I totally forgot to mention one thing last night - he's been raiding my paints for about two years now, and usually has no problems with picking a colour provided I've put things back in the rack.  Then again, I had originally sorted my paints by hue, which made this a LOT easier.  Decision indecision usually isn't something he has to deal with for paints.

 

He would definitely describe himself as a novice though.

 

 

1 hour ago, Doug's Workshop said:

I'm going to go against the grain here and suggest instead of buying a whole bunch of new paints, effort should be made into learning color theory and how to mix your own colors from existing shades.

I've tried to talk him into such, edge him into it softly...  He has no interest in outright mixing from scratch.  I still admire Pingo's selection of paints...  In a previous thread, most of us were showing off our hordes of dropper bottles, and paraphrasing she was all "I've got 13, and can do so much with them".  I personally want to learn such, but yeah, hubby has absolutely no interest in colour mixing from scratch.

 

1 hour ago, Doug's Workshop said:

There's really no reason to have 18 shades of blue. I say this as someone who has 18 shades of blue from various manufacturers.  Or, I can take a mid blue, add a bit of blue or brown liner to darken it.  I can add a bit of dark liner and a lighter color to desaturate/gray it.  I can add a touch of orange to make it a different gray.  It makes for faster painting, and trains you to use your eyes to see colors instead of color names (the "I have to use leather brown because I'm painting leather" effect).

I saw that number, and was about to disagree on it....  Until I realized that getting the Bones, Pathfinder, and CAV sets would literally wind up having 18 shades of blue...  The interesting part is he takes one look at what I currently have, and usually the shade of blue or purple he's looking for we actually don't have... o_O  It would be a really nice selection of blues though..!

 

1 hour ago, Doug's Workshop said:

The necessary paints?  Liners, several lighter colors, the clears, and a selection of mid-tones. 

I suspect liners would be more my toolkit, since I prep and prime his minis for him - he likes painting, but all the usual up front prep he also has no interest in..

 

 

1 hour ago, Kuroneko said:

I would keep it fairly simple and get him the Bones complete set and the box of 'Tone' washes from Army Painter. That stuff is talent in a bottle, especially the Flesh Wash. I wouldn't touch the other AP paints with a ten foot pole though <_< Maybe round it out with the liner and additives triads. 

Oooh, that's an idea I hadn't contemplated.  I had considered the Secret Weapon washes, which I've liked, but boy they're annoying to keep in solution, and it seems like you spend more time keeping them mixed up than you do painting with them.  And Army Painter stuff is available locally too.

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I've never owned nor really wanted to own a full set of anyone's paint. I've always purchased a few paints at a time for need or desire. And I've only been serious about mixing colors for a very few years.

 

16 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

... taking something that's 95% of the way there and adding a bit of white or black to nudge it in the general direction.

 

With that, you can probably get by with 4 dozen paints easily enough. It would require purchasing a curated set of paints (I need a dark warm blue, a mid-tone warm blue, and a light warm blue, a dark yellowish brown, a dark reddish brown, ....). A great deal of every company's full paint set is very minor variations on a theme.

 

I have really a lot more than 48 paints, of course. ::P:

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10 hours ago, Kuroneko said:

I would keep it fairly simple and get him the Bones complete set and the box of 'Tone' washes from Army Painter. That stuff is talent in a bottle, especially the Flesh Wash. I wouldn't touch the other AP paints with a ten foot pole though <_< Maybe round it out with the liner and additives triads. 

 

8 hours ago, WhiteWulfe said:

He would definitely describe himself as a novice though.

 

8 hours ago, WhiteWulfe said:

has absolutely no interest in colour mixing from scratch.

 

With these ^ givens. Considering all the comments in the thread. Try this for a (draft) purchase order list:

  • "the box of 'Tone' washes from Army Painter" ...Kuroneko's recommendation
  • The Reaper Liners, all of them
  • The Reaper Clears, all of them
  • The Reaper Triads, most of them, if not all of them
  • Two or three Whites
  • Two different blacks
  • The metallics box set(s) from Scale 75 
  • Reaper Adamantium Black, and both Brush-On Primers (white/Black)
Edited by TGP
Forgot three things
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I would ask the novice what they want from the painting experience. If they want to get miniatures on the table I would follow the people recommending pain sets (the paint set depending on the miniature period/type they are interested in). To start of I would choose a paint set that consisted of about 10 - 20 paints.

Now if they want to mix colours, spend a lot of time painting one miniature or have experience in traditional art; I would recommend an artist acrylic set/personally chosen selection. This would result in a bigger entry hurdle but I find it more rewarding in the long run. Given that you don't seem to have experience with artist acrylics that is probably not a good choice since it requires more mixing and control of the consistency of the paint. 

 

Overall I would still recommend to buy a titanium white from an artist acrylic range (Golden, Vallejo, Liquitex, Winsor and Newton). 
 

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On 1/2/2020 at 1:53 AM, strawhat said:

Let him raid your paints from time to time for a couple drops if you have the perfect shade of brown that he doesn't (yet) have.  Easier said than done, I'm sure--kind of like lending dice.

I'd start with this.

 

After that, I would prioritize as follows:

 

First, make sure you agree on paint protocol: Discuss how to store and arrange paints.  Get in the habit of making sure you both put paints back when you're done for the day.

 

Then, make sure you can both paint at the same time: If there are paints that you and he are always using and there are times that both of you want to use them at the same time, get duplicates of those.

 

Then, make sure you don't run out: If there are paints that both of you are always using, get another bottle so you have one on hand in case you finish off a bottle at 1 am.

 

Then, make sure you have a sufficient range of colors: If there are holes in the paint collection, fill them.  A novice (or lazy) painter will benefit from having more colors on hand rather than having to worry about mixing them.  (While I don't doubt I would benefit from trying to mix my own colors from the standard set of artist paints, I'd rather just sit down and paint.)

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If he really is new, there's always the Reaper Learn to Paint Kits. Add some skin triads and the Army Painter Quickshade Ink set.

 

Or, pick up a suggested set that has colors which (ahem) are not in your collection. :poke:

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6 minutes ago, ced1106 said:

If he really is new, there's always the Reaper Learn to Paint Kits.

I'll second this too.  I found @Wren's guides in the Bones LTPKs (especially LTPK #2) extremely helpful as a novice.

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