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Seam Lines ... For the 1,000th Time.


Highlander
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For this year, I resolved to really pay attention to seam lines and their eradication.  First, to really look at the mini and determine where the seams are.  Then to attack them.  But, often, I get fired up to paint and .... well, you know the result when you discover a seam about halfway completing a mini.

 

I've asked before, and read, and been advised on eliminating seam lines.  I use glue and files and sandpaper before I prime.  Haven't used putty yet ... for major gaps.  Usually, I get almost all of the major seams, especially any raised seams, sanded, or filled, or smoothed.  However, there is still one type of seam line that defeats me.

 

This is the very fine line that is a depression -- a very, very narrow slit or V-shape or trenched seam -- that just doesn't want to go away.  A blade will peel off a lot of material around it ... it flattens the surrounding surface and the line is still there.  Sandpaper will rough up the area around the seam; finer sandpaper will smooth down the lumpy surface created by the coarser sandpaper ... but the line is still there.  Glue can be a partial solution, but it takes very fine control ... and sanding ... and, after I prime the area, the line is still there.

 

I recall, I think, that someone recommended using gloss sealer to fill the seam line.  Does anyone actually use this, or a similar, technique?  And, if you do, how do you do it and what tips might you provide?  How many coats does it normally take?  And is much sanding required?

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I don't use a knife for those, I use small round files.

They usually do the trick.

 

File with the curves!

For eample the seam line is on a leg, then use the file in such a motion it will go around the leg a bit.

And with care, look at it every time you filed a little, so you won't file off too much.

 

Image result for kleine ronde vijl"

Edited by Glitterwolf
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3 hours ago, Marineal said:

I use gw 'ardcoat. Put on a layer. Let dry. Repeat as necessary. Seals it up and smooths it over. 

 

Isn't this essentially a gloss sealer ... sort of like Future?

 

7 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

I don't use a knife for those, I use small round files.

They usually do the trick.

 

File with the curves!

For eample the seam line is on a leg, then use the file in such a motion it will go around the leg a bit.

And with care, look at it every time you filed a little, so you won't file off too much.

 

Image result for kleine ronde vijl"

 

I omitted mentioning files ... I do use them.  After they've removed some of the material, I use sandpaper, in increasingly fine grits, to smooth the filed surface.  Perhaps it is my technique.

 

What brand are the files shown?

Edited by Highlander
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1 hour ago, Highlander said:

 

Isn't this essentially a gloss sealer ... sort of like Future?

 

 

I omitted mentioning files ... I do use them.  After they've removed some of the material, I use sandpaper, in increasingly fine grits, to smooth the filed surface.  Perhaps it is my technique.

 

What brand are the files shown?

 

These are just an example pic from the internet ( modelcraft) I use generic ones bought in a DYS.

 

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Gloss sealer a good way to go for a lot of minor flaws that could ruin a lot of detail to remove by other means. But I've found that you don't just brush it across the mold line and expect it to go away. I dab it on the line, so it builds up thicker than if you just brushed a line across it. This way it builds a smooth shell around the flaw. It might take a few layers with drying to achieve, but its better to do more layers than one thick layer and overshoot what you want.

 

Another thing you might consider is a set of needle riffler files:

 

1949601013_rifflerfileset.jpg.fe21d0ea0261baaf85136c2068f1492c.jpg

 

The curves on them can sometimes be useful for getting into inaccessible places for a straight file. You can get a set on Amazon fairly cheap (<$10).

 

But gloss varnish is my usual go-to-fix for that stuff. Especially on Bones plastic, files just seem to make it worse on Bones.

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14 hours ago, Cicciopiu said:

Vallejo Plastic Putty (the one that comes in the tube, not the drop bottle). Apply it, let it dry, use the knife or files to take off the excess. Done.

pp.thumb.jpg.0389a8a87235ea604503f2fa6dfafa90.jpg

 

1.  How long does the putty take to dry?  I'm going to let my current mini dry overnight and see it that is sufficient.  I had a bottle I"d never uses and am using it now ... until I can get a tube and compare.

 

2.  Does it sand?

 

3.  I think I'm putting it on a bit thin.  I've modified my approach and, toward the end, began putting it on significantly thicker and tried to blend it in with the surrounding surface.  We'll see.

 

4. I have discovered, as I apparently overthinned the putty, that a thin wash seems to be helpful in smoothing out rough surfaces ... such as a cloak with decidedly bumpy patches.  And, in the case of a Grecian robe, I've been able to close two holes that an imperfect casting provided and to fill a couple of pits in the robe.  That is impressing me.

 

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1 hour ago, Highlander said:

 

1.  How long does the putty take to dry?  I'm going to let my current mini dry overnight and see it that is sufficient.  I had a bottle I"d never uses and am using it now ... until I can get a tube and compare.

 

2.  Does it sand?

 

3.  I think I'm putting it on a bit thin.  I've modified my approach and, toward the end, began putting it on significantly thicker and tried to blend it in with the surrounding surface.  We'll see.

 

4. I have discovered, as I apparently overthinned the putty, that a thin wash seems to be helpful in smoothing out rough surfaces ... such as a cloak with decidedly bumpy patches.  And, in the case of a Grecian robe, I've been able to close two holes that an imperfect casting provided and to fill a couple of pits in the robe.  That is impressing me.

 

 

It's just acrylic paint with filler in it to make it shrink less as it dries, otherwise known as modeling paste. Marble dust is common, though I don't know if that's what Vallejo uses. It can be sanded a bit, but usually you can smooth it before it dries so there is no need to. Drying time is entirely dependent on how thick you put it on along with the temp and humidity. If you do want to sand longer is better, I'd leave it at least a day before sanding.

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'ard Coat is essentially just gloss sealer, yes.

 

I have used gloss sealer for this. And even Reaper's brush-on sealer for minor imperfections. It is a super handy tool for smoothing out surfaces. With gloss you need to be careful to not add texture since it's thick enough to build up ridges on the edges and stuff like that. It's also tricky to tell if you've got enough since either sealer is transparent. I paint a coat of paint on to check and then build up some more coats of sealer if I need to. But apart from those caveats, super useful and handy, and a lot of painters use these tricks a lot.

 

Also I will fix this kind of stuff if I don't find it until I start painting. I just try to be careful of the stuff I've already painted and use knife/file/sealer as appropriate to improve the surface. 

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19 minutes ago, Wren said:

It's also tricky to tell if you've got enough since either sealer is transparent.

 

Since it's just acrylic medium (and you can use a thicker medium like gel medium in addition to the regular stuff), you can mix a bit of paint into the sealer/medium so that it's easier to see. For that matter, if you don't notice the mold line until after you have an area painted, you can even match the paint color to the underlying surface. It's likely that you'll still need to blend in the colors, since it's nearly impossible to get the color perfect, but that's much easier if you're starting with something close to the final color.

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Is this for display or assembly? 

 

For assembly, I'll quickly paint the putty along the mold lines. It's imprecise, but takes care of *most* of the mold lines, in the least amount of time, and is much faster than filing. Then, I'll prime with a color brush primer, and wash. This reduces the amount of time I need to basecoat the miniature. I'll still find mold lines, so I'll go after them with a engraving tool. Re-apply the primer, then basecoat.

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11 hours ago, Highlander said:

 

1.  How long does the putty take to dry?  I'm going to let my current mini dry overnight and see it that is sufficient.  I had a bottle I"d never uses and am using it now ... until I can get a tube and compare.

 

2.  Does it sand?

 

3.  I think I'm putting it on a bit thin.  I've modified my approach and, toward the end, began putting it on significantly thicker and tried to blend it in with the surrounding surface.  We'll see.

 

4. I have discovered, as I apparently overthinned the putty, that a thin wash seems to be helpful in smoothing out rough surfaces ... such as a cloak with decidedly bumpy patches.  And, in the case of a Grecian robe, I've been able to close two holes that an imperfect casting provided and to fill a couple of pits in the robe.  That is impressing me.

 


It takes a couple of hours;
it sand like a charm.
And yes, you may thin it, you may use a brush to blend it, sand it etc.

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