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mwhowell2001

Question about paints

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I'm trying to work on expanding my paint collection and I heard that some of the Reaper paints have an adhesive or something worked in to make them bond to plastic better.  Is that accurate?  It sounded like gossip to me but I wanted to confirm it because heaven knows I'm a painting newbie.

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Mainly it's that Bones plastic is also a special formula that's intended to be able to take paint without primer.  Reaper paints have a small amount of flow improver included in their formulation which helps to overcome the natural hydrophobic tendencies of the plastic (as long as you don't dilute them with water before trying to lay down a base coat.) This makes primer optional, (though there is some debate on that point.)  Reaper's Liner paints are particularly effective as a replacement for primer on bones plastic.  Once that base layer is down you can paint normally.

 

This doesn't mean the paints will necessarily stick better to Polystyrene(PS) , which is what is typically used to produce miniatures and scale models. (particularly the ones that come on rigid sprues) You still need primer for those.  Incidentially Reaper does offer a couple of brush on primer options.  

 

You'll find most of us here are big fans of Reaper's paint.  Myself, in all my years painting, have used 3 different generations of Citadel, P3, Army Painter, Scale75, Vallejo, Tamiya, Testors Enamels and Acrylics, and numerous different craft and ceramic paints over the year.  At present, Reaper MSP makes up the majority of my use with some support from army painter and citadel.

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That's kind of interesting about the flow improver already being mixed in.  I was not aware.  

 

I remembered seeing something called Wash Medium on the store a while back.  What's that used for?

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I too have an extensive collection of different brands of paints. I find that Reapers paints are both high quality and more importantly, well suited for miniatures. 

 

Wash medium is used to thin paints to a wash, a thin consistency used in many techniques. If you use water to thin the paint, the colours might break (fall apart / separate / become patchy). The medium keeps the colours from breaking as it contains the same coherency-substances that are in the paint. This means you can thin to a much greater degree than with water.

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If you want a little more background: Wash Medium is about a 1:1 mix of matte medium and water.  There are several paint wash recipes that went something like "Mix 1 drop Brown Liner with 3 drops Brush-On Sealer (essentially matte medium) and 3 drops water" and people kept asking for a premade mix of the matte medium/water mix.  And so Wash Medium was born.

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In general you're better off just buying some primer and not worrying about it. That way you don't have to worry about the type of plastic, metal, or resin and what brand and color from that brand sticks best to whatever type of minis you have. As a bonus you can buy primer in bottles larger than 17ml which will save you money in the long run.

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1 hour ago, cmorse said:

In general you're better off just buying some primer and not worrying about it. That way you don't have to worry about the type of plastic, metal, or resin and what brand and color from that brand sticks best to whatever type of minis you have. As a bonus you can buy primer in bottles larger than 17ml which will save you money in the long run.

Not bad advice at all, but I would also add that you should if possible stick to non-aerosol primers to be safe.  For one thing there's little to no chance of interaction with the bones plastic or funky resins. For another, you can prime when weather conditions are not optimal for spray. (spray primer doesn't give good results when the humidity is high, the weather is really cold, etc)

I'll also add that, based on my 'grab whatever's handy and use it, but sometimes actually try harder' experience, I'll say that Badger Stynlrez is hands down one of the best primers anywhere and I'll fight you on it. Stick to plastic. Sticks to resin. Sticks to metal.  Sticks to greenstuff, sticks to plaster, you name it, it sticks.

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Stynlrez is the go to primer for anyone using an airbrush, pretty much the standard that all the rest are compared to. If you do need to rattlecan, Army Painter and Tamiya are the only ones that will reliably work well on original Bones.

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1 hour ago, Corsair said:

Stynlrez is the go to primer for anyone using an airbrush, pretty much the standard that all the rest are compared to. If you do need to rattlecan, Army Painter and Tamiya are the only ones that will reliably work well on original Bones.

 

Stynylrez is also what I'd recommend for brush on primer.

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if you cant get stylnerez where you are, vallejo acrylic primer (for airbrush, can be brushed normally as well) also works well on bones

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On 3/18/2020 at 9:41 PM, mwhowell2001 said:

I'm trying to work on expanding my paint collection...

What is in your paint collection now?

 

Quote

...and I heard that some of the Reaper paints have an adhesive or something worked in to make them bond to plastic better.

That sounds like a paraphrasing, of an explanation, of a priming technique ...which has effectively morphed into a hoax. 

 

Reaper paints are acrylics. Full stop. 

 

Quote

 Is that accurate?

An adhesive **additive? I don’t believe so. 

 

Quote

It sounded like gossip to me but I wanted to confirm it because heaven knows I'm a painting newbie.

I would recommend getting all of the colors Reaper calls “Liners”. 

 

Someone*** discovered that the liners do adhere to the bones plastic better than the other paints in the MSP line. The liners are a slightly different base formulation (which makes them excellent for “lining”). But no special additive is involved. 

 

 

**acrylic paint is already close to the same level of stickiness as white glue anyway. Some people use it to stick down sand and other basing material. 

 

***we like to creditblame @buglips*the*goblin

 

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Acrylic paint essentially started life as glue. In many crafting hobbies people use medium (the acrylic binder part of paint that holds the colour pigment part of paint in suspension) as a glue. It works for gluing on static grass and similar basin items in miniature painting, as well. It sticks very well to itself. Some mixed media artists make films of acrylic paint on slick plastic like Saran Wrap that they then peel off and attach to something else with more paint/medium.

 

Is it going to stick to everything? Nope. Metal and resin are very slick surfaces. They need a true primer because the primer etches in to the surface (microscopically) and then the paint sticks to the primer. But a lot of plastic miniatures are like the plastics in the paint, so it adheres well. I'm sure there are types of plastic that are different since there are like a million plastic formulations. So if you are wanting to use any acrylic paint on a specific plastic miniature brand, I would test the paints you're using on it to see if they stick well or if you're going to need a primer. You can use the bottom of bases and sprues as testing areas if you don't want to apply directly to a miniature.

The Reaper Bones miniatures (both original flavour and new Black) are definitely a compatible type of plastic. You should be able to paint on them with most acrylic paints, but the Reaper paints are a tested formulation that has been demonstrated to adhere well. Don't pour your painted Bones in a baggie where they'll bang together for storage, but all you really need to do is keep them from scraping against each other or the storage area to keep your paint jobs safe. (Layering between sandwiches of bubble wrap works for me for storage of large numbers.)

Reaper's Brush-On Sealer is essentially a satin medium. You can use it as a sealer. You can also use it as an additive to make paint more transparent but not thin and watery. It is a way to dilute something down to wash transparency and paint directly on Bones minis. It does have matting agents, though, so always shake it really well before use to disperse these throughout the product or you might get a frosted effect on your last third of the bottle. Wash Medium is essentially half medium half water mix, which many of us use for mixing washes and glazes. I don't think it has the matte medium in it, but doesn't hurt to shake it well prior to use anyway. 

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On 3/23/2020 at 11:50 AM, Wren said:

but doesn't hurt to shake it well prior to use anyway. 

I don't know of any paints we use in this hobby that can be hurt by shaking the broccoli out of them.

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