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Rictur Builds A Wet Palette for 63 Cents


TGP
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Our Anti-Hero Rictur Diehn the Assassin (2430) has decided to build a Wet Palette**

 

 

PARTS LIST:

  • Peanut Butter Jar Lid, 90mm, culled from recycle bin
  • Peanut Butter Jar Lid, 85mm, culled from recycle bin
  • Paper Towels, Bounty Brand, nicked from kitchen
  • Parchment Paper, Reynolds Brand, nicked from kitchen
  • Copper Wire, Solid, 3mm OD, purchased from Home Depot for $0.63 / foot

 

QUANTITIES (In Order):

  • (1), (1), (4 half sheets), (2 layers), (10--12 inches (255-300mm) )

 

 

#Searchwords

TGPTGP;  acid washed; Palette; Recycle Bin; Scratchbuilt; Plastic Lids; Copper

**With some off camera help from Pendrake The Griffon

Edited by TGP
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A6E646E4-C641-4FB5-A7ED-39AF6A9F35A0.thumb.jpeg.631580af097876227b5f4a83c004e22b.jpeg

There is Rictur (the acid-washed) inspecting ^ the raw parts that have been delivered to the assembly area.

 

6BCDD738-7FA0-4D71-851A-F2E6EF3A1B88.thumb.jpeg.a0d766efc9cb643f8b146f725c310c35.jpeg

The first step was to mark a point on the smaller (85mm) jar lid.

Edited by TGP
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49D7E8B8-A82F-4C1A-8205-FD9B98AD74A0.thumb.jpeg.bc9032c1eb1d0ca16afbfb68ddec34fb.jpeg

The 85mm Lid has been rolled along the length of the wire to get the approximate length. 

 

(Off camera, the Griffin ripped the wire apart at the point marked with the Sharpie® )

 

Next the Sharpie® traced the outline of the 85mm Lid on the paper towel stack. 

9312939C-1267-4FCC-8AE8-F67A935D520A.thumb.jpeg.06148db9e615a582596d2528a092594d.jpeg

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FF7C8F99-319E-4860-863A-8CE5E9E21439.thumb.jpeg.2d799d7bd5673360d7bffb329bb10a77.jpeg

The Fiskar® Scissors made short work of the paper towels and then moved on to the parchment paper. 

 

Inspecting the final parts:

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(One more parchment disk needed.)

 

Final Assembly** Complete:

D4F128D8-4FD8-4DBB-8423-6BF9F7995227.thumb.jpeg.9c1b0bd0bfe62e8db6db8adf18013c46.jpeg

(Rictur is standing on the 90mm Lid; which will function as a lid to seal in the humidity.)

 

**The assembly order starting at the bottom is:

85mm lid

paper towel

paper towel

paper towel

paper towel

parchment layer

parchment layer (optional)

copper wire

 

The larger 90mm lid drops over the whole thing when not in active use.

Edited by TGP
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2 hours ago, Highlander said:

Other than having to love peanut butter -- in various sizes -- ingenious!

Your recycle bin may vary. YRBMV  Other lids from other products ought to be usable. 

 

A potential ECO (Engineering Change Order) that might be coming down the pike is to add a trimmed circle of children’s craft foam to the inside of the larger lid. Theory being that something squashy up there might make a better seal. 

 

A second ECO in the works involves adding a small water well to sit on top of the parchment. It might be useful for keeping the humidity level elevated while the lid is on. Parts procurement is inwork; testing to follow. 

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On 3/22/2020 at 10:15 PM, TGP said:

Your recycle bin may vary. YRBMV  Other lids from other products ought to be usable. 

 

A potential ECO (Engineering Change Order) that might be coming down the pike is to add a trimmed circle of children’s craft foam to the inside of the larger lid. Theory being that something squashy up there might make a better seal. 

 

A second ECO in the works involves adding a small water well to sit on top of the parchment. It might be useful for keeping the humidity level elevated while the lid is on. Parts procurement is inwork; testing to follow. 

 

You know what an ECO is!  And probably know what a T.O. and a T.C.T.O. is.  You're the man.

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