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Russell

Eyes - with an example of 1st venture

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Context:  I was using Aves Apoxie Sculpt to fill gaps, no attempts at sculpting.  When I had excess putty I started sticking it to a (fake) coin measuring about 40mm across.  I had no plans for it; I just needed somewhere to put it other than the rubbish bin.  Eventually I decided to try using those extra lumps of putty to actually create something so I made feet and continued adding to the legs, torso, arms, and finally the head.  

 

There was no planning to this so when I got to the face I decided to keep the eyes simple.  As you can probably guess, I grabbed a ball-nibbed tool and stuck it in his face for small, beady eyes.  So my question:  how do you do eyes that actually look like eyes?  I've seen Siri's dragon bust with the sockets built then balls of putty stuck in and lids sculpted over.  I've seen Malefactus's use of beads.  Please share your technique.  With all this time on my hands in lockdown I expect I'll spend some of it with my putty.

MBTettinBelung.jpeg

Edited by Russell
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Depends on what I am doing.  If I am doing a human face, I do the whole face in one go.  The eyes are pressed in with a special tool I made.  Then the eye lids are set, defined, and teased out.  That process also adds curvature to the eyeball.  It is a very hard thing to get the hang of and requires a lot of practice, but is necessary to get really good expressive faces.  For all other eyes, i either start with a smooth ball of putty that I put into a socket and let cure, or I cheat and use steel ball bearings.  Then I use strips of GS to create the eyelids.

 

This sculpt shows my process fairly well:

 

Steel balls in a skull:

c15.jpg.248fcb813640403b69ac881db6c230b7.jpg  

 

 

Eye lids (weird angle, sorry):

 

c21.jpg.a44d977c7d0c365578a39580936726bf.jpg

 

 

Later they wanted changes and bigger eyes, so I stripped the eyelids off, added some putty to the eye ball to make if bigger, let it cure, then added eyelids.

 

Before adding putty with the eyelids removed:

 

c27.jpg.06135a363694d6c58e99b2c0934d5bd2.jpg

 

 

Finished:

 

c29.jpg.56edd86652ee11c8325087a00c97ee6c.jpg

 

 

I use this process for nearly everything, from a 10mm dog to a full sized dragon.  I get the ball bearings off of Amazon.  If I need a size I don't have, I just make balls of putty int he right size; it just takes longer.

 

Actually, if you wanted to, you could still do this to that guy you made.  Just grind out eye sockets using a dremmel ball burr, then sculpt it as I did on the one above.

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Thank you so much.  I hadn't thought of ball bearings.  What diameter bearings do you use for 28mm humans?

 

 

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I don't use them for humans.  Its hard to get the expression right.  I'm also not sure, since I have a range of sizes from 0.5 mm to 3 mm; I never measure, just use what fits.

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Amazon.  I just type in Ball Bearings X mm, where X is the size I want and sift through what comes up.  They typically come from China. 

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Thanks for sharing, Russell.

I've sculpted a few dozen human/humanoid figures for Reaper -- in Green Stuff putty, not Aves Apoxie.  You can look for my figures in the store and/or forum, and decide whether to trust my advice.  :;):

I also sculpt faces all in one go (like Andy explained), using a technique that I mostly stole from sculptor Werner Klocke.   I exaggerate the eyes when I sculpt them, because I like painting larger eyes. 

I use a sharp #11 X-Acto blade to cut the inner and outer corners of each eye -- 2 cuts at each corner, so the result looks like  < > ... and then light horizontal cuts to connect the tops and bottoms of the < > cuts. 

I'm cutting deeper at the edges of the eyes, and the cohesion of the Green Stuff makes the overall shape of the eye seem rounded/spherical without there actually being a hard sphere. 

 

There are lots of ways to do it.

If I remember right, Sandra Garrity sculpted her figures' eyes the way Andy describes, with hard spherical eyeballs set into hollow sockets and then eyelids added as a separate batch of putty. 

 

Good luck!

Derek (Schubert)

 

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On 4/23/2020 at 4:15 AM, dks said:

Thanks for sharing, Russell.

I've sculpted a few dozen human/humanoid figures for Reaper -- in Green Stuff putty, not Aves Apoxie.  You can look for my figures in the store and/or forum, and decide whether to trust my advice.  :;):

I also sculpt faces all in one go (like Andy explained), using a technique that I mostly stole from sculptor Werner Klocke.   I exaggerate the eyes when I sculpt them, because I like painting larger eyes. 

I use a sharp #11 X-Acto blade to cut the inner and outer corners of each eye -- 2 cuts at each corner, so the result looks like  < > ... and then light horizontal cuts to connect the tops and bottoms of the < > cuts. 

I'm cutting deeper at the edges of the eyes, and the cohesion of the Green Stuff makes the overall shape of the eye seem rounded/spherical without there actually being a hard sphere. 

 

There are lots of ways to do it.

If I remember right, Sandra Garrity sculpted her figures' eyes the way Andy describes, with hard spherical eyeballs set into hollow sockets and then eyelids added as a separate batch of putty. 

 

Good luck!

Derek (Schubert)

 

 

This is a MUCH better description of how I do human eyes too; probably because DKS is one of the three sculptors who taught me how to do it in the first place and is really, REALLY good at it. ;)  Do what Derek says for humans.

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On 4/23/2020 at 4:15 AM, dks said:

Thanks for sharing, Russell.

I've sculpted a few dozen human/humanoid figures for Reaper -- in Green Stuff putty, not Aves Apoxie.  You can look for my figures in the store and/or forum, and decide whether to trust my advice.  :;):

I also sculpt faces all in one go (like Andy explained), using a technique that I mostly stole from sculptor Werner Klocke.   I exaggerate the eyes when I sculpt them, because I like painting larger eyes. 

I use a sharp #11 X-Acto blade to cut the inner and outer corners of each eye -- 2 cuts at each corner, so the result looks like  < > ... and then light horizontal cuts to connect the tops and bottoms of the < > cuts. 

I'm cutting deeper at the edges of the eyes, and the cohesion of the Green Stuff makes the overall shape of the eye seem rounded/spherical without there actually being a hard sphere. 

 

There are lots of ways to do it.

If I remember right, Sandra Garrity sculpted her figures' eyes the way Andy describes, with hard spherical eyeballs set into hollow sockets and then eyelids added as a separate batch of putty. 

 

Good luck!

Derek (Schubert)

 

 

I know Patrick Keith does this method as well. I used to mark the outer corners with a pin prick so it just made two little small holes and then used my C shaped clay shaper to indent the upper and lower lids lines. I found the softer and uniform curve I got from the tool made eyes I liked better than the exacto blade. Very similar but I thought I'd add my two cents haha

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Related to Rainbow Sculptor's story about using a pin I knew of a few English sculptors that cut the eyes in with a razor blade as described, then used a needle to poke in the inside and outside corners. Supposedly it made the eye more rounded after being cut in but I could never get it to work when I tried it. Maybe next time I break out my hand sculpting tools I'll try it again!

On 4/9/2020 at 6:46 AM, TaleSpinner said:

Amazon.  I just type in Ball Bearings X mm, where X is the size I want and sift through what comes up.  They typically come from China. 

 

I totally stole the ball bearing idea from Talespinner and I used to use it on larger figures. I bought a bunch of little ball bearings on Ebay for next to nothing. Hooray for cheap solutions!

 

I don't see why it couldn't be used on human sized models, I just didn't try it. Technically eyeballs are, well, a ball. It would just require making depressions for the eye, then adding in more putty after inserting the ball bearings to make the eyelids and surrounding structures. 

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Yep!  See, Andy and Christine and Glenn are excellent sculptors, and each has a different way of doing it.  Even when we see how our peers do something, we still adapt and customize the techniques to fit how we work -- different tools, different materials (putty or clay) that behave differently in our climate zones, different handedness (left or right), etc.

Derek

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