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Glitterwolf's 3D Printing Adventures


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11 hours ago, Clearman said:

Are the foo dogs a single STL that is mirrored, or two completely unique models?

 

Chitubox has a mirror function, so you /could/ add supports to one model, and then mirror it to save some time.

 

These are a single STL file with mirror.

 

7 hours ago, ratsmitglied said:

with the foo dogs you may actually get a better result by placing them so that the base is aligned with the print bed (or slightly angled with the base down), as they actually look like you may be able to print them with supports only on the base - based on the size of them I'd also seriously consider using the hollow function as they will have some significant suction as they are. Do you mind PMing the location of those foo dogs for me and I'll have a look for you.

With the other figures, I think you probably need to play with the angles/locations on the plate a bit more to get them in the best orientations for printing - by changing angle etc. you may be able to significantly reduce the number of supports, although you will have a cost of increased print time. Personally I would go with the longer print time and easier post-print cleanup!

 

Thanks!

I'm still tinkering and learning to use the chitubox.

These are the files I want to print first when I set it all up, now to learn how to create the best orientation.

 

I will put the Foo Dogs base down then.

As for the others, I used a 45degree angle for all.

At first I had them elevated a bit but flat. I rather go for a shorter print time the first time, so I can be around to see if nothing explodes/catches fire/or other disasters..

When I fully trust the machine to do it's job and it works I will probably move it to the basement, hoping it can print at that temperature, it seems RobinH and Jasper_the_2nd have no problems with their printer under those circumstances.

 

One of the reasons I bought that printer, this might sound silly...

I'm getting older ( 55+ now) and I've read that if you learn new things your mind will thrive and chances of getting dementia and such are less.

So I'm inclined to learn new stuff every now and then too stay sharp.

 

With this I have to learn to operate a new machine, use a new program ( chitubox) and how to handle resin etc..

All in all a lot to learn.

And of course, it's Star Trek Science to me, I grew up with the original Star Trek and this is something I never thought I would see in my lifetime.

I hope to be able to figure it all out, it's so cool if I can print minis out of a liquid.

 

Also, maybe one day I will try the Z-brush stuff and try to digitally sculpt something which I can print then.

But that's for later, when I have it all figured out.

Then again, maybe that's out of my league, but we'll see.

 

I love this tech although I'm a non-technical person.

And I'm very happy with all of you, giving advice, showing your own work, sharing settings and ideas.

 

It may take a while before something is actually printed ( let alone painted...) but the journey has begun!

 

To boldly go where no Wolf has gone before!

 

 

 

Edited by Glitterwolf
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I completely understand that! 3d printing is definitely going to help keep your mind active.

 

regarding print times, I've found that chitubox is pretty accurate in its estimates, but you will need to get the right settings for the resin (which if you've already got you should be able to find those online fairly easily), so it's just a matter of running the slice and seeing what it tells you.

If you are concerned about the print times then I'd suggest finding something smaller, like a treasure pile, to start with, and go from there, rather than starting with a larger object. As I mentioned in the other thread my first print on the Photon was a 1/35 scale M2 Browning for a mate to replace a terrible one in a model kit, and that was a single item

I know that all the tutorials say to fill the build plate, but if you are concerned about the print time and dangers etc. then just print one or two models at a time until you are comfortable with the settings and how the printer works.

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26 minutes ago, ratsmitglied said:

I completely understand that! 3d printing is definitely going to help keep your mind active.

 

regarding print times, I've found that chitubox is pretty accurate in its estimates, but you will need to get the right settings for the resin (which if you've already got you should be able to find those online fairly easily), so it's just a matter of running the slice and seeing what it tells you.

If you are concerned about the print times then I'd suggest finding something smaller, like a treasure pile, to start with, and go from there, rather than starting with a larger object. As I mentioned in the other thread my first print on the Photon was a 1/35 scale M2 Browning for a mate to replace a terrible one in a model kit, and that was a single item

I know that all the tutorials say to fill the build plate, but if you are concerned about the print time and dangers etc. then just print one or two models at a time until you are comfortable with the settings and how the printer works.

 

Thx.

I'm still a bit confused about which settings I should use.

 Filling the build plate, I was thinking that way I got more chance of at least on of those minis to turn out a decent enough.

 

I will save the things I do to be able to either adjust them or print it out later.

All in all it's interesting to learn.

Now I need time to unpack it all and start for real.

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Filling the build plate does not increase print time the way it would for an FDM printer, so you might as well. Though starting on something small might be good if you want to wait around for it. It's just the height that increases print time.

Keep in mind though that resin printing works best above 20C, below that you might get failures simply due to the temperature. My printer is in my shed, so I have to wait a bit longer to start it up again :unsure: I'm considering getting one of those small space heaters for reptiles for it though.

 

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Actually Glitter I would start with smaller single models to get used to how to support them and print them before loading the build plate.   The more you have on the build plate the more suction it can create on the FEP and thus cause the print to fail.  Also if one of the models in the group ends up not being correctly supported you will end up with cured resin floating around in the tank (and you will not see it) that can then cause a puncture in the FEP or block the build or get fused with another component thus causing a failure.

 

Start small, get used to everything and slowly work your way up to filling the plate.  If you have a model you want multiple copies of I would create a single print first and save it under another name after you have added your supports, test print and if good then copy it in Chitubox to fill the build plate.

 

Also when in Chitubox and using the sliders to check for island always,  I repeat. ALWAYS make sure the slider is fully at the top after slicing before save the file.

 

Always save the file to your hardisc and then use windows tools to copy it to the memory stick.  Never save directly to the memory stick as this is a known issue with chitubox.

 

Sorry for the long rant... but my Canadian ten cents (exchange rate) worth based on my experience so far.

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1 hour ago, robinh said:

Actually Glitter I would start with smaller single models to get used to how to support them and print them before loading the build plate.   The more you have on the build plate the more suction it can create on the FEP and thus cause the print to fail.  Also if one of the models in the group ends up not being correctly supported you will end up with cured resin floating around in the tank (and you will not see it) that can then cause a puncture in the FEP or block the build or get fused with another component thus causing a failure.

 

Start small, get used to everything and slowly work your way up to filling the plate.  If you have a model you want multiple copies of I would create a single print first and save it under another name after you have added your supports, test print and if good then copy it in Chitubox to fill the build plate.

 

Also when in Chitubox and using the sliders to check for island always,  I repeat. ALWAYS make sure the slider is fully at the top after slicing before save the file.

 

Always save the file to your hardisc and then use windows tools to copy it to the memory stick.  Never save directly to the memory stick as this is a known issue with chitubox.

 

Sorry for the long rant... but my Canadian ten cents (exchange rate) worth based on my experience so far.

What this guy said!  All of it!!  And then read it again! 

 

Start small, figure out what works for you and then add more.  I usually print 1 piece at a time and the larger dragon I made required 4 prints, each in the 12 hour range, but I'm running at .04mm layers which obviously slows things down. 

 

I have weeks where Chitubox doesn't crash once and then on the next project I need to step away after crash/freeze #1900324 before I smash something. 

 

Also, while you should take his and all advice (even mine!) with a grain of salt, 3DPrintingPro on Youtube has some decent videos on support and settings, all with the goal of minimizing the support cleanup afterwards.  Now he's a bit of a "oh no, the sky is falling" kind of guy, but his 5 part series on supporting an umberhulk (if I recall correctly) helped me not go as crazy with Chitubox.  I did follow, mostly I think, his support settings and the small ones are really really tiny, but it's also so deceptive when you're zoomed in looking for errant pixels, sure they all look big.

 

image.thumb.png.4bba089621c4a468331f9fcd250cb161.png

You've started over but if you look at your first picture with supports, your 1 naga warrior had support bumps coming through his back.  These would have been visible on the finished model.  I'm assuming you hollowed the model?  If you did, and there was not the minimum amount of space to add the designated type of support, Chitubox puts in a larger (because that makes sense!) rod.  Supporting chins and the like are often tricky because of this.  Also, if you do hollow and you do use the auto supports, Chitubox almost fills the interior of the model with supports... 

In this fellow's case, I would print him upright so that all you have to support other than the bottom of the body is his shield and weapon arm, likely with a couple other small details.  Sanding the bottom when you're all done with be quick and easy and you won't have supports to detach from his face and all over the detail on the shield. 

for most pieces, I put a few big/heavy supports on the bottom and only use medium and light ones after that and, touch wood, things have gone mostly well for me. 

 

 

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13 hours ago, robinh said:

Actually Glitter I would start with smaller single models to get used to how to support them and print them before loading the build plate.   The more you have on the build plate the more suction it can create on the FEP and thus cause the print to fail.  Also if one of the models in the group ends up not being correctly supported you will end up with cured resin floating around in the tank (and you will not see it) that can then cause a puncture in the FEP or block the build or get fused with another component thus causing a failure.

 

Start small, get used to everything and slowly work your way up to filling the plate.  If you have a model you want multiple copies of I would create a single print first and save it under another name after you have added your supports, test print and if good then copy it in Chitubox to fill the build plate.

 

Also when in Chitubox and using the sliders to check for island always,  I repeat. ALWAYS make sure the slider is fully at the top after slicing before save the file.

 

Always save the file to your hardisc and then use windows tools to copy it to the memory stick.  Never save directly to the memory stick as this is a known issue with chitubox.

 

Sorry for the long rant... but my Canadian ten cents (exchange rate) worth based on my experience so far.

 

Thank you!

I will heed your advice!

Will start over and choose one file.

 

What are your experiences with printing at lower enviroment temperature?

I'm torn between printing in my hobby room ( temp ranges from 20 celsius and up) or in my basement ( temp ranges from 14 to 16 celsius).

Main reason I would like to set it up in the basement is because of fumes/noise etc and Brutus who sleeps in the Hobby Room as well.

I can open a window in the hobby room, but the basement has better ventilation.

I understood from @Jasper_the_2nd that he and you both had succesful prints from the Elegoo Mars with such temperatures.

Did you have to adjust any settings?

 

 

11 hours ago, Rahz said:

What this guy said!  All of it!!  And then read it again! 

 

Start small, figure out what works for you and then add more.  I usually print 1 piece at a time and the larger dragon I made required 4 prints, each in the 12 hour range, but I'm running at .04mm layers which obviously slows things down. 

 

I have weeks where Chitubox doesn't crash once and then on the next project I need to step away after crash/freeze #1900324 before I smash something. 

 

Also, while you should take his and all advice (even mine!) with a grain of salt, 3DPrintingPro on Youtube has some decent videos on support and settings, all with the goal of minimizing the support cleanup afterwards.  Now he's a bit of a "oh no, the sky is falling" kind of guy, but his 5 part series on supporting an umberhulk (if I recall correctly) helped me not go as crazy with Chitubox.  I did follow, mostly I think, his support settings and the small ones are really really tiny, but it's also so deceptive when you're zoomed in looking for errant pixels, sure they all look big.

 

image.thumb.png.4bba089621c4a468331f9fcd250cb161.png

You've started over but if you look at your first picture with supports, your 1 naga warrior had support bumps coming through his back.  These would have been visible on the finished model.  I'm assuming you hollowed the model?  If you did, and there was not the minimum amount of space to add the designated type of support, Chitubox puts in a larger (because that makes sense!) rod.  Supporting chins and the like are often tricky because of this.  Also, if you do hollow and you do use the auto supports, Chitubox almost fills the interior of the model with supports... 

In this fellow's case, I would print him upright so that all you have to support other than the bottom of the body is his shield and weapon arm, likely with a couple other small details.  Sanding the bottom when you're all done with be quick and easy and you won't have supports to detach from his face and all over the detail on the shield. 

for most pieces, I put a few big/heavy supports on the bottom and only use medium and light ones after that and, touch wood, things have gone mostly well for me. 

 

 

 

Thanks.

I had not noticed those bumps!

Good point.

 

Nope, it wasn't hollowed!

 

I figured I could reduce print time by laying the minis flat instead of printing them upright.

That's why I chose this lay out.

If I put the naga upright wouldn't he take much longer?

 

Also, suppose I want to print the ONI, that one comes in three parts ( his arms are separate) do I need to print those in different sessions then?

 

Thanks all!

I will pick a mini and set that one up.

 

Now to figure out which one,

Maybe the Bat Demon or a Naga Warrior.

 

Edited by Glitterwolf
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I have an anycubic photon S and I love it! Looks like you are enjoying it yourself, and congrats on a fun new tool for the hobby.

 

here are a couple suggestions I can offer you.

1) positioning the model is very important. Find an orientation where you need the least supports and they will be the least visible. This will often be about a 30 angle on its back, but really depends on the mini. The more upright you go, the longer it takes, but the more you can hide the supports.

2) use manual supports, the auto support function is terrible! It might be a tool you can use to get an idea, but I’m a hard pass on that. I use a lot of Light supports for almost everything, and you can tweak the touch points of the supports so they aren’t as deep. My light supports pull off with my hand with little to no artifacts on the model. I use a few medium supports per model to anchor it. I put these in spots you will never see. Like the heel of the feet and any major undercut. The edit support feature is fiddly, by really helps you pull a support away from the model or get into a wired spot. You can also change where the support touches the model to hide them even more. I was having all these supports running up the legs of minis and couldn’t possibly clean them off and it was frustrating. Pull them away from the model, more than you’d think.

3) look from the bottom of the build plate and go up in layers, looking for islands or spots with undercuts. The flatter the surface, the more supports you’ll need. When in doubt, use a support.

4) do one model at a time until you know the supports work as expected and the print is stable. Once you have a stable file, you can pack the build plate. I usually do a test print. If that looks okay, then I know file is good to go. Otherwise I can make specific edits. You don’t want to end up with full plate of stuff that can be ruined for something that was missed somewhere else.

5) anytime you fail, you need to clean your film and the resin bath. Stuff gets caked onto the film and you’ll fail all prints after that. Floating chunks of cured resin in your bath is no good either. I hate cleaning my bath so I...

6) take your time setting the supports. I spend about 15-30 mins per mini setting up the supports. Upfront time saves you repeated print time and clean up time.

 

overall I love my anycubic. Definitely some frustrating times and challenges to start, but now I can look at a mini, know which way to orientate it and where my supports need to go. I really suggest taking the time one model at a time and learning from your mistakes. Look at a failed print, and then look at your file. Oh, I needed a support on that elbow or under that mace handle, or brim of hat. After a couple times of analyzing a failed print, you start to catch on and get the hang of it.
 

best of luck!

 

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I'm not sure there is one single answer.  It's all just a game of balancing the different factors and determining the best combination for a specific print.   When orienting a model, I only consider a couple basic things when determining what angle to use.  What angle will allow me to support the model with the fewest supports and minimal scaring, how the print lines will interact with the models detail, and whether I can minimize the print cross-section.

 

Having fewer supports is easy.  The fewer supports, the fewer contact points that require clean-up or sanding before painting.

 

How the print lines interact is a little tricky.  Printing at 0.05, most print lines are not visible, but they do become visible at certain curves.  This can be solved by printing at a smaller layer height, but smaller layers create more layers and in some cases more islands that need supports.

 

I consider the print cross-section because this has potential to cause failed prints.  The larger the surface area of a given layer, the more force is required to pull the layer off the FEP.  This sometimes results in the print being pulled off the build plate.  If you have a tall, skinny model it will have a narrow cross section.  If you lay that model on it's side, now it's cross section is the entire length of the model.  It's not really that big of a deal with you have 1 or two models on the build plate, but the more you print, the greater the chance.

 

All of this is focused on the quality of the finished print.  I don't worry too much about time as I don't consider it that big a factor.  The largest print I've done is 1733 layers at 0.05, which took just over 6 hours.  YMMV because of exposure settings.

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Just now, Glitterwolf said:

Unpacked the Mars today, cleaned my workspace.

That will be all for now.

 

QUESTION:

I see a little glare/bubble? On the Fep Film?

Is this a problem?

It's only visible under a certain angle, seems tight enough.


Second pic!

 

 

20200421_170601.jpg

20200421_181728.jpg

20200421_172157.jpg

20200421_172200.jpg

 

@Neatpete @Clearman Thank you for your advice!

 

I will now choose one mini for the first file.

Hoping to try it out during the 3 day weekend that's coming ( Kingsday Monday!).

 

I want to try a file and not use the Rook Test file from the Mars, I consider it a waste of resin to print that Rook which I never will need.

Or is this an unwise move??

 

Any thoughts on the FEP?

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20200421_181728.jpg

 

The bubble is from the protective cover on the bottom of the FEP.  Grab the red sticker and peal it off.  Just like the screen protectors for phones, tablets... 

 

25 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

Do you tinker with these?

After Slicing?

 

image.png.0871d90aa73c199bdc24ec248a0df6b6.png

image.png.0dfefe0f0e3789cef460c729c40a78b8.png

You would tinker with these depending on the resin you are using BEFORE you slice.  Once you slice the model, it breaks it down for the printer based on these settings.  

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1 minute ago, Rahz said:

20200421_181728.jpg

 

The bubble is from the protective cover on the bottom of the FEP.  Grab the red sticker and peal it off.  Just like the screen protectors for phones, tablets... 

 

You would tinker with these depending on the resin you are using BEFORE you slice.  Once you slice the model, it breaks it down for the printer based on these settings.  

 

I use Elegoo Mars Grey.

Density is also 1.1 as is the default in Chitubox for this machine.

So that means I'm good, right?

 

 

 

 

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