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Glazing?

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Playing around trying something new.  I'm fairly rigid with my thinking and just trying to do something where colors that don't blend really fade into others is stretching me.  Would a glazing technique work here?  Or does that really only work when one color and doing highlights/shading?

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Glazing might help; I think I would map out the areas of violet and teal and use a blue glaze to transition them, as both of those hues have blue in common. Clear blue from Reaper or a blue acrylic ink would work better than blue paint.

 

However I would try wet blending. There are lots of videos on YouTube on the technique. It might also work better if you blend the blue into the violet, and the blue into the teal, but try to avoid blending the teal and violet as they only have blue in common. It can be done, but it will be harder.

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Glazing would help, it's time consuming though.

Every glaze ( watery thin) needs to be applied and dried before adding the next one.

Be careful with inks, I've used inks, they're great but I do think they're better used like a paint than as a glaze or wash.

 

 

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Thank you.  I do have transparent paints, including a blue.  This is my first foray and I'm mentally prepared to strip as necessary.  I do think as I continued to slap paint around onto it last night, that I inadvertently did some wet blending.  I'm at a point in my hobbying where I want to pay attention to what I do as I stretch my "tool box".  I got base coat, wash, and basic highlighting down...as well as dry brushing too.  Just stretching now and being intentional with new stuff.  Thanks to all and once I give some more effort, I'll post more pics along the way.

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Next step.  Went with the clear blue.  Liked it, darkened things up a bit so I did a lot of glazes also of varying shades of purples and blues.  Not the effect I was originally going for, but this turned out quite all right for my skills.  Still need to do more shading and a bit more highlighting too...and other areas to "finish" him up.  I have been dry brushing a light aqua blue and a light "pea" green color and have been happy.  I think in the end I will also gloss coat him or use water effects to make him appear slimy.  

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Finished Lou up.  Posting the final product in the "Show-off" forum.  Thank you for your help again.

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Late reply, but try zenithal highlighting with glazing. I think glazing is easier from a light basecoat.

 

I've also found glazing useful in assembly line painting. I had 20+ western miniatures to paint, so slapped on a brown as a basecoat on an area of each of them, even if the brown wasn't quite right. Then I'd use the right brown to fine-tune an area of the miniature with glazing, usually suchthat I had a gradation of shade on the area (eg. leave the edges whiter as a highlight).

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