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Ral Partha Houri, second version-warning Semi-exposed mammal parts with transparent clothing


72moonglum
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Hi guys,

so I did a Ral Partha Houri a couple weeks back, where she had darker skin and beige/white garments.  The original thought was make them semi transparent, which the first time out didn't work too well.  I've got a few copies of this figures, so I gave it another go.

Here's a link to the first one:  https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/90984-ral-partha-houri-with-dagger-sculpted-by-dennis-mize/

 

and here is my second version, which was done as a blonde and tried to figure out a little bit better the transparent clothing.  The front picture is linked here:

http://www.miniatures-workshop.com/lostminiswiki/index.php?title=Image:DF-690_Blondinka_A.JPG

 

because she's kind of exposed, but not fully.

 

Here is the Instagram link that shows all the photos, if you have access to Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/p/B_OeNsuHl_s/

 

and finally, some pictures that aren't showing the naughty parts:

 

384642448_DF-690BlondinkaE.JPG.495d6176db9266921968e1e8edb949b0.JPG1376382680_DF-690BlondinkaF.JPG.4d3a2f2f4449443745f31589f9eb8816.JPG

 

Which are actually two photos.  A bit awkward, but if interested you can go to the Instagram spot and/or the other link.

 

Might end up doing another version as well, now that I'm starting to get the transparent clothing figured out. I have one more of these models and a few other minis I could use this technique with I think.

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, 72moonglum said:

Thanks Glitterwolf! Hope you were able to see the links to her front view too!

 

I could!

Any Bard in the party will be defenseless against her charms!

Paladins will question their vows.

Rogues will gladly hand over their loot.

Fighters will get weak in the knees when they see her.

Our hope lies in the Wizards who with all their wisdom will see how dangerous she actually is.

 

image.png.f20ef3c77633bad5942f2d8c9699b922.png

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22 hours ago, Fencig said:

nice!

The translucency in here clothing is sublime

 

Ral Partha always takes me back to happy days

Hopefully it turned out okay, I’ve got some other minis I’m going to practice it with I think to get it right.

 

For me, some of Partha is nostalgia, but a lot of it is just me liking the style of miniatures, the size, the feel of the.  Liked them back them, like them even more nowadays.

 

18 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

 

I could!

Any Bard in the party will be defenseless against her charms!

Paladins will question their vows.

Rogues will gladly hand over their loot.

Fighters will get weak in the knees when they see her.

Our hope lies in the Wizards who with all their wisdom will see how dangerous she actually is.

 

image.png.f20ef3c77633bad5942f2d8c9699b922.png

 

 

Let’s just hope that whatever dungeoneering party she ends up with, it’s in a warm climate!

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2 hours ago, Citrine said:

The clothing turned out great, but it's the face that blows me away. I know how small she is.

What kills me for both of my versions of this figure and their eyes are slightly uneven. Neither one of them came out exactly like I wanted to, but thank you very much for the compliment!

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Good work! I like what you've done with both of these.

 

Advice from my very limited experience painting translucent/sheer cloth:

Overall principle: The color of what's under the fabric (e.g. skin) will show through more where the fabric is tight against it, including the valleys of any wrinkles in the cloth.  Conversely, the color of the fabric will dominate where the fabric is out away from the skin (the ridges and sides of the wrinkles), and where there are multiple layers of cloth (hems/edges). 

I can think of at least 3 ways to do this with paint: 

A) Paint the underlying material (i.e. skin, for your figure) as though there weren't any cloth over it, and then glaze over with the cloth color; use multiple glazes or thicker layers for the edges and ridges.   Maybe the most intuitive -- you're actually covering the skin with the "fabric" (paint).  Best if the fabric is really sheer/transparent.

B) Paint the cloth as though there weren't any skin under it, but then glaze the skin color into the valleys and other areas where the underlying material would show through the cloth.   Good if you're just giving a hint of what's under the cloth.

C) Manage the skin and the cloth while you're layering/blending -- both sets of colors on your palette, mixed together and applied to the figure in whatever proportions give the right result.  Probably the toughest option, but some people's painting styles may favor this one.

 

Anyway, this is my rendition of a light blue translucent cloth veil, with "embroidery" and an abstracted lace texture, over dark hair.  It's from 12-15 years ago, but I think I would do about the same now.

14212_KristGoth_dks_rearside-hairdetail.jpg.739c00f143566e47221bf878842505fa.jpg

 

Thanks for sharing!

 

Derek

 

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12 hours ago, dks said:

Good work! I like what you've done with both of these.

 

Advice from my very limited experience painting translucent/sheer cloth:

Overall principle: The color of what's under the fabric (e.g. skin) will show through more where the fabric is tight against it, including the valleys of any wrinkles in the cloth.  Conversely, the color of the fabric will dominate where the fabric is out away from the skin (the ridges and sides of the wrinkles), and where there are multiple layers of cloth (hems/edges). 

I can think of at least 3 ways to do this with paint: 

A) Paint the underlying material (i.e. skin, for your figure) as though there weren't any cloth over it, and then glaze over with the cloth color; use multiple glazes or thicker layers for the edges and ridges.   Maybe the most intuitive -- you're actually covering the skin with the "fabric" (paint).  Best if the fabric is really sheer/transparent.

B) Paint the cloth as though there weren't any skin under it, but then glaze the skin color into the valleys and other areas where the underlying material would show through the cloth.   Good if you're just giving a hint of what's under the cloth.

C) Manage the skin and the cloth while you're layering/blending -- both sets of colors on your palette, mixed together and applied to the figure in whatever proportions give the right result.  Probably the toughest option, but some people's painting styles may favor this one.

 

Anyway, this is my rendition of a light blue translucent cloth veil, with "embroidery" and an abstracted lace texture, over dark hair.  It's from 12-15 years ago, but I think I would do about the same now.

14212_KristGoth_dks_rearside-hairdetail.jpg.739c00f143566e47221bf878842505fa.jpg

 

Thanks for sharing!

 

Derek

 

Thanks very. much Derek for the tips and advice!   I think I used A) for the blonde houri and B) for the dark haired houri.  

 

Your own example turned out very nicely!     I think I'm going to try to improve my technique with a couple of figures I have lying around. If it turns out correctly it really ends up looking very nice. I just need mine to turn out correctly!

 

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