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Russell

Warning: Paint Bottle Blowout

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As a public service I wish to warn any who are otherwise unaware.  The drip nozzles of our half ounce bottles will blow out given enough internal pressure.  This results in a rather widespread splatter.

 

I just had this experience.  I now have paint splattered in a 3' radius around my work station.  Oops.  I also ruined a jumper and a shirt.  I hadn't changed out of my work clothes yet.  

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Oops. 

 

If you get yourself a t-pin, a quilt pin, or an embroidery needle you can easily clear any blockages in the future.  Also, from time to time Reaper sells a "pokey tool" that does the job as well. 

 

 

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That's actually part of the curiosity.  I had attempted to clear it with a quilting pin.  It even came out with pigment on it.  So I squeezed with confidence and blop!  It was like oobleck everywhere.

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Too bad they don't put that warning on the bottles.  It would be nice if they also told people the dropper tips come off if needed to add water to the paint or to add an extra agitator.  Also, that the bottles contain a glass agitator which can sometimes get stuck.  Sometimes thin pins are not sufficient to clear the hole.  Occasionally you come across a defective tip that needs a thicker pin, paper clip or micro drill bit to force the plastic out of the way.

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As much diss as pots get, they at least don't explode (though they should be shaken while holding down the top) and you can add an agitator and thinner easily to them.

 

My favorite containers are the airbrush primers and craft paint. Cheapest per ounce, flat top, shake, unscrew and paint from the cap for the basecoat. If you need to do anything fancy, keep the cap on, flip the top, and drip a drop onto the palette. 

 

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2 minutes ago, ced1106 said:

As much diss as pots get, they at least don't explode (though they should be shaken while holding down the top) and you can add an agitator and thinner easily to them.

 

My favorite containers are the airbrush primers and craft paint. Cheapest per ounce, flat top, shake, unscrew and paint from the cap for the basecoat. If you need to do anything fancy, keep the cap on, flip the top, and drip a drop onto the palette. 

 

 

Yeah... pots can do nonsense too.

 

Old hexagonal pots splooted all over the rim. Had a GW pot drip out the back of the lid down the back of the pot when I opened it and had it sitting on the table during use. It was an awful mess. Not a pressure based thing, but still a pain in the rear.

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Also, pots are a pain to keep sealed properly between uses. 

 

I use the pokey tool on any paint bottle I haven't used in a while, before even trying to get paint out. And if I feel that it doesn't cooperate properly, it's unbent paperclip time.  

 

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I also use a paperclip for this.

Have had this happen a few times especially with scale 75 and vallejo bottles.

So if i haven't used a bottle in a while I never just trust it...look, shake, squeeze a little, and if necessary paperclip time.

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35 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

Also, pots are a pain to keep sealed properly between uses. 

 

I use the pokey tool on any paint bottle I haven't used in a while, before even trying to get paint out. And if I feel that it doesn't cooperate properly, it's unbent paperclip time.  

 

 

Gadgetman how is the paperclip a  stronger measure than a Pokey Tool (T-pin) ?  (Both are the same diameter, I thought .... or is your gear different?)

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Same diameter, or at least pretty close. but the paperclip is a straight cut end, not pointy. Where the pointy tool gently opens up a passage, the paperclip end tends to crush its way through and displace anything hard enough to be pushed.

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On 5/14/2020 at 11:54 PM, Gadgetman! said:

Same diameter, or at least pretty close. but the paperclip is a straight cut end, not pointy. Where the pointy tool gently opens up a passage, the paperclip end tends to crush its way through and displace anything hard enough to be pushed.

The paperclip will tend to clear the entire clot of paint instead of just forcing a hole through the middle, which will just close again and faster than the first time because the tip is already partially blocked.

One way to slow down the process is to store your paints in airtight containers between use.  Slows down the evaporation of the volatile elements so your paints remain in good shape for longer.

I have Floquil Model Railroad Paints that I store in metal cookie tins with the lid taped all the way around between uses that are still in excellent condition.  Floquil has been out of production of rover two decades now.

GEM

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