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Randomness XVII: The Madness of the Quorum


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Sweet I can actually use this guy this Saturday!!!

 

Admiral Gnoph
$13.79
SKU: 50345
 
50345_w_1.jpg
 
At least I think I have him. I had my RCON ninja last year grab all the Spellj err Star Fron....errr Chronoscope! releases at the time. It's the barrel chuckng "Gif" figure that I don't have. Which I can't find in the store anymore. Hopefully that one is still being produced.
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2 hours ago, kristof65 said:

Holy Broccoli. 

Trying to get shipping quotes for shipping that glass panel to the client this morning:

image.thumb.png.9226a9eb324324fb529dbcb761242079.png

Lowest one so far is 4x what the same crate cost to be shipped to us. 
 

 

 

At those prices it might save you money if you drive it to the client personally.

 

Seriously, the more I think on it, the more that would make sense.  As long as the client is in the US, you can pretty much go anywhere and deliver it is a few days.  Even with gas and hotel (all deductable) you could probably do it for about 1/2 to 3/4 that rate.

 

 

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Not wanting an overcast day to go to waste, I took a bike ride up to Pavillion Cemetary. It is all that now remains of the town of Pavillion, which died out in the late 1800s after new roads replaced the original trail from Chicago to Ottawa upon which it lay. As late as 1932 some of the original buildings remained, but now the Pavillion Heights subdivision occupies the place it once did.

100_1775.JPG.43bb9a58b549507ed1a7bee37c9f15d4.JPG

Located North of the subdivision entrance.

Spoiler

100_1776.JPG.529f11f231e1660183e058f528c05988.JPG

Unquiet spirits of the original settlers are apparently foiled by a simple elastic strap. 

100_1778.JPG.b8a69e2f68d99727c4a358ae3f9ca2df.JPG

Most of the graves date from 1850-1880 although I did find a few from the 1930s and towards the road there was a newer section.

100_1780.JPG.12a9e0d980f1fcb234fa224984748e70.JPG

A large amount of the stones in the central portion had some beautiful weathering. Unlike modern gravestones, there was more individuality to stones of the 1800s.

100_1811.JPG.fda023076be9be6261e9ee35f2163ab6.JPG

The central section of stones.

100_1812.JPG.de238b52a8b44eeb253cd0cf384255a1.JPG

West of the previous picture, unfortunately vandalized sometime in the last 150 years.

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Some pillars and a peek of the cornfield beyond.

100_1816.JPG.417ce867dc61420bd68a9986e6873d85.JPG

Again the central section. 

 

 

I haven't been here in around 23 years, so it was pleasant to see the place pretty much unchanged except for some missing trees.

 

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28 minutes ago, TaleSpinner said:

 

At those prices it might save you money if you drive it to the client personally.

 

Seriously, the more I think on it, the more that would make sense.  As long as the client is in the US, you can pretty much go anywhere and deliver it is a few days.  Even with gas and hotel (all deductable) you could probably do it for about 1/2 to 3/4 that rate.

 

 

True, but then we're giving away our time for free. Maybe if we had a bigger vehicle so that the whole family could go AND the window properly packed, that would be an option.  We're open to the client driving out and picking it up in person, though. 

But all is not lost. 

After chatting with a customer support agent, and properly checking off needed services, I got some more reasonable quotes:
image.thumb.png.44d1f41ee4fc246caf16a0f544c7a3dc.png

What's weird is how all over the place these quotes are.  FedEx Freight was $2200 compared to UPS's $676, and I have an account with FedEx and not UPS.  One company came in at $4700. 

 

My wife contacted the client to discuss this, and he didn't flinch at the freight prices - all he was concerned about was if he could pay the final invoice and shipping with a credit card. 

One of my favorite distributors came to our rescue. She called me on another matter this morning, and we wound up having a chat about shipping in general, which led me to mention this pricing issue I was having.  She handles freight shipping for them, and she offered to look into shipping it on their account for me. Just got the quote in from her, and it came in less than the lowest rate above. We can even pay her a "surcharge" on top of it, and still save the client money. 

 

27 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

Plus you're probably more careful with it...

 

You would think so :devil:

Getting her glass supply and finished pieces from her old studio in Colorado to her new studio here in Iowa a few years ago was a real challenge.  Despite all the care we took, we still had some damaged glass. 

And then we had to do it again with her dad's glass studio after he passed away last year, and despite what we learned from the first trip, we still had more damaged glass. 

I feel a lot better about the big heavy crate we have this one packed in. While it won't survive being dropped off a forklift, or being run through by one, it will handled bouncing along the highway a lot better. 

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1 minute ago, kristof65 said:

True, but then we're giving away our time for free. Maybe if we had a bigger vehicle so that the whole family could go AND the window properly packed, that would be an option.  We're open to the client driving out and picking it up in person, though. 

But all is not lost. 

After chatting with a customer support agent, and properly checking off needed services, I got some more reasonable quotes:
image.thumb.png.44d1f41ee4fc246caf16a0f544c7a3dc.png

What's weird is how all over the place these quotes are.  FedEx Freight was $2200 compared to UPS's $676, and I have an account with FedEx and not UPS.  One company came in at $4700. 

 

My wife contacted the client to discuss this, and he didn't flinch at the freight prices - all he was concerned about was if he could pay the final invoice and shipping with a credit card. 

One of my favorite distributors came to our rescue. She called me on another matter this morning, and we wound up having a chat about shipping in general, which led me to mention this pricing issue I was having.  She handles freight shipping for them, and she offered to look into shipping it on their account for me. Just got the quote in from her, and it came in less than the lowest rate above. We can even pay her a "surcharge" on top of it, and still save the client money. 

 

You would think so :devil:

Getting her glass supply and finished pieces from her old studio in Colorado to her new studio here in Iowa a few years ago was a real challenge.  Despite all the care we took, we still had some damaged glass. 

And then we had to do it again with her dad's glass studio after he passed away last year, and despite what we learned from the first trip, we still had more damaged glass. 

I feel a lot better about the big heavy crate we have this one packed in. While it won't survive being dropped off a forklift, or being run through by one, it will handled bouncing along the highway a lot better. 

 

Given the value and the unique part, I think you need some sort of insurance in case it would get damaged during transport?

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14 minutes ago, MusicalFeline said:

New is in.

 

OPERATION: AUDITION FOR "YOU'RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN"

TIME: 16:05, 9/9/2020

I will be singing Johnny Cash's "Ring of Fire" and performing Act 2, Scene 1, "Snoopy's Imagination".

 

Yay?!?

 

 

Congrats!

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20 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

My wife contacted the client to discuss this, and he didn't flinch at the freight prices - all he was concerned about was if he could pay the final invoice and shipping with a credit card. 

 

Did she tell him no, she wants it all in coins so she could swim through it like Scrooge McDuck? #lifegoals

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25 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

 

Given the value and the unique part, I think you need some sort of insurance in case it would get damaged during transport?

Oh yes.  Insurance is often the reason I pay professionals to do something I could do myself. 

Funny thing I noticed  - in the quotes above, the lower priced quotes were offering a higher insurance limit. 
 

5 minutes ago, ManvsMini said:

 

Did she tell him no, she wants it all in coins so she could swim through it like Scrooge McDuck? #lifegoals

LOL!  I'll have to mention that to her. 

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1 hour ago, Lord of the Dish Pit said:

Not wanting an overcast day to go to waste, I took a bike ride up to Pavillion Cemetary. It is all that now remains of the town of Pavillion, which died out in the late 1800s after new roads replaced the original trail from Chicago to Ottawa upon which it lay. As late as 1932 some of the original buildings remained, but now the Pavillion Heights subdivision occupies the place it once did.

100_1775.JPG.43bb9a58b549507ed1a7bee37c9f15d4.JPG

Located North of the subdivision entrance.

  Hide contents

100_1776.JPG.529f11f231e1660183e058f528c05988.JPG

Unquiet spirits of the original settlers are apparently foiled by a simple elastic strap. 

100_1778.JPG.b8a69e2f68d99727c4a358ae3f9ca2df.JPG

Most of the graves date from 1850-1880 although I did find a few from the 1930s and towards the road there was a newer section.

100_1780.JPG.12a9e0d980f1fcb234fa224984748e70.JPG

A large amount of the stones in the central portion had some beautiful weathering. Unlike modern gravestones, there was more individuality to stones of the 1800s.

100_1811.JPG.fda023076be9be6261e9ee35f2163ab6.JPG

The central section of stones.

100_1812.JPG.de238b52a8b44eeb253cd0cf384255a1.JPG

West of the previous picture, unfortunately vandalized sometime in the last 150 years.

100_1814.JPG.3a0a5c0ea1160cf4486047699bd71eee.JPG

Some pillars and a peek of the cornfield beyond.

100_1816.JPG.417ce867dc61420bd68a9986e6873d85.JPG

Again the central section. 

 

 

I haven't been here in around 23 years, so it was pleasant to see the place pretty much unchanged except for some missing trees.

 

 

& here I am reading about Berez from Curse of Strahd, while planning to run a Roll20 Ravenloft game for my FLGS, next month. Great pics!

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PSA:

 

I just received a text regarding an "Amazon security alert". After chatting with a customer service rep, it was determined to be a phishing/scam.   

 

Just wanted to let everyone know & advise to check with Amazon before opening to verify it's validity.

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While on my way back from the cemetary, I noticed that down the street someone was throwing out a comfy looking desk chair. So I seized it and brought it back. (getting more than a few odd looks as I held the chair to the front right of the bike and continued at speed) Thankfully the thing didn't break in two until after I got it into the garage.

I've been looking to get a new chair for a while now, so I wasn't about to let a little thing like a completely snapped off stem and base stop me.

Luckily I had an ancient stool near to hand and thus...

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Comfy back support achieved! (try and ignore the cluttered nature of the painting corner. Technically it's organized because I can remember where most everything is...)

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The redneck magic of plywood at work. There's eight hefty screws holding it together and no shifting. More thru luck than skill I got it properly centered, and testing has shown that it has no problem supporting the Dwarf-like rotundness I've gained this year.

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8 hours ago, kristof65 said:

You got that right.

 

If it is just simple color matching, then it isn't too bad - glass is manufactured in a huge array of colors. It's accounting for the other properties of glass that make it hard. For example, if you want translucent glass so that it can be back-lit, you have to choose the glass while it's back-lit with a similar type of back lighting, because some glasses have a wide color shift.  And then if you're doing any kiln work of the glass, you have to be aware that some colors will actually change color during the kiln firing process. And then not all colors photograph accurately. 

 

I just did a plate that uses a green that looks black when sitting on the table, but when held up to the light is a brilliant green to the naked eye, but still looks black if you photograph it.

Part of what contributes to this is the modern day dependence on digital photography.  Most, like 99%+ of what people are using to both photograph and display the material being worked with, aren't calibrated to any kind of recognized standard.  This includes the equipment being used to display the digital output [both monitors and print output] as well as the camera input.  Add in the variations caused by working under different lighting conditions and you have a can of worms to deal with.

It was easier in the days of film photography as the type of film and the lighting conditions were easier to control for any material to be used as an example and model for work in another medium to be done.

GEM

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