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Randomness XVII: The Madness of the Quorum


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Just got my first commission to print and paint miniatures, from one of our players, for her Kill Team.

 

Hooray!

 

Then I looked at the STLs she had put on the flash drive. Eeeep!

 

Slaanesh corrupted S&M space nuns! :blink:

 

Shibari daemonettes with BALL GAGS! ::o:

 

And a torture powered walker with a naked lady chained to it!

 

Jen looks like such a MILD MANNERED person. :wacko: Yikes!

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3 minutes ago, PaganMegan said:

Just got my first commission to print and paint miniatures, from one of our players, for her Kill Team.

 

Hooray!

 

Then I looked at the STLs she had put on the flash drive. Eeeep!

 

Slaanesh corrupted S&M space nuns! :blink:

 

Shibari daemonettes with BALL GAGS! ::o:

 

And a torture powered walker with a naked lady chained to it!

 

Jen looks like such a MILD MANNERED person. :wacko: Yikes!

It's always the quiet ones. :devil:

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2 minutes ago, ratsmitglied said:

Should I be worried that I consider anything within 300km to be comfortable day-trip distance?

 

Not sure where if you're in that range or not

 

Mind you, my commute to work is about 110km...

I've noticed a strong correlation between where someone lives, and how far they consider a comfortable day trip.  Here in Iowa, and back when I lived in Colorado, 120 miles (200km) is a common day trip for many people.  When I was stationed in Australia, the 365km trip to the next nearest town was something a lot of my fellow shipmates did just to go to a bigger club than the base had. 

Yet I've had arguments with customers in Hartford CT who were unwilling to drive to Springfield MA to pick up parts because "it takes too long and I'd have to cross a state line!"

 

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1 hour ago, Arkady said:

Fun fact: I already found two places claiming to be the largest online shop for Dutch expats, and neither actually has menthol kruisdrop. Hey, at least one of them offers Dutch 'dairy' drinks that are all Alpro soy stuff, making it far *less* scammy than the other one, which is trying to con me into buying some German diet shake powder as a traditional Dutch dairy product.

 

Is it wrong of me to wish them a slow, agonizing rest of their life, preferably a couple of decades of being forced to watch Hogan's Heroes re-runs 24/7/365?

 

Not wrong :ph34r:

Venco Menthol Kruisdrop, very addictive!!!

 

23 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

I've noticed a strong correlation between where someone lives, and how far they consider a comfortable day trip.  Here in Iowa, and back when I lived in Colorado, 120 miles (200km) is a common day trip for many people.  When I was stationed in Australia, the 365km trip to the next nearest town was something a lot of my fellow shipmates did just to go to a bigger club than the base had. 

Yet I've had arguments with customers in Hartford CT who were unwilling to drive to Springfield MA to pick up parts because "it takes too long and I'd have to cross a state line!"

 

 

It has to do with traffic and roads.

If I have to drive for more than two hours in the Netherlands I'll end up exhausted.

I've been to Arizona and those roads and the maximum speed etc, it was relaxing to drive there for me.

When I got back I had to drive from Germany to The Netherlands ( I took a flight from Dusseldorf ) I immediately felt stressed by the speed, crowded traffic, aggressive drivers etc..

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13 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

I've noticed a strong correlation between where someone lives, and how far they consider a comfortable day trip.  Here in Iowa, and back when I lived in Colorado, 120 miles (200km) is a common day trip for many people.  When I was stationed in Australia, the 365km trip to the next nearest town was something a lot of my fellow shipmates did just to go to a bigger club than the base had. 

Yet I've had arguments with customers in Hartford CT who were unwilling to drive to Springfield MA to pick up parts because "it takes too long and I'd have to cross a state line!"

 

There is a definite correlation, but at the same time I've noticed that in my local area some people won't travel to the next largest town (~40km) and make do with the nearest town even though it has very limited choice, and is missing many services.

People in my nearest 'large' city won't travel <30km to get to a store because it's on the other side of a lake...an artificial one at that. 

 


 

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On 5/11/2021 at 4:52 PM, Mad Jack said:

 

  Here's an interesting synopsis of the resin casting process, copied from the latest update on Broken Toad's Labyrinth/Dark Crystal  Kickstarter...

 

  Hide contents

 

Hi Everyone

 

      It has dawned on us that, despite having a lot of backers who are experienced model painters and builders, we also have a lot of backers who come from the Jim Henson fandom & collectables world who will have never purchased or experienced a resin model kit before. This is clearly a huge over sight on our part as these backers won't have any understanding of resin production or how we create these model kits, we'd like to apologise for this and put this right for you by giving you a little insight into our world and how we go about bringing these miniatures to life.

 

     Firstly you need to know that resin model production is a process that is undertaken completely by hand, unlike some manufacturing processes, such as plastic injection molding, there are no automated machines that can do any of the work for us. This causes the work to be quite slow and very labour intensive, however the final product ends up being of much higher quality and detail than anything a machine can produce.

 

     After the characters have been sculpted the first step in creating resin model kits is making the silicone molds, to do this the original sculpt has to be fully encased in liquid silicone so that all the details can be captured and ultimately replicated in the final casts. When your models arrive you will notice some parts have what appear to be little rods attached to them, when creating a mold the sculpt needs to effectively be suspended in mid air so that it can be fully surrounded by the silicone, to do this we build what is known as a sprue and those rods are part of that sprue. The sprue serves two purposes, it helps keep the model suspended in the silicone and also provides a way for the liquid resin to finds its way into the mold during casting. 

 

A sprued up sculpt tends to look something like this,

image.png.849d71e42e767ef79eb5c63782f21416.png

         Sculpts that have been sprued up for mold making

 

   Once the sculpts have been sprued up we need to build a box around them to hold the silicone in place, the silicone then needs to be weighed out, mixed and poured into it's mold box to cure.

 

image.png.0d574e8d85d62e23a495eec09b86089d.png

   Molds after the silicone has been poured

 

     At this stage the molds are left for 24 hours so that the silicone can cure, once the silicone has cured it is subjected to various heat treatments before it is considered fully cured and the mold is ready to be opened so we can remove the original part.

 

     This next stage is probably the most time consuming part of the entire process, as you can see the silicone we use is solid and opaque in colour and the sculpt currently inside them needs to be removed. This is done by taking a very sharp scalpel blade and a very steady hand and cutting the sculpt free from the mold, we need to be so precise when doing this as any cuts we make will show as mold lines on the final cast and cuts made in the wrong place will result in poor quality casts, all of this is done while not being able to see the sculpt inside the mold. 

 

     As you can imagine, this is a very time consuming process.

 

image.png.6ed9863e5e004cc4f5abd2c65f801628.png

     A cured mold being cut open for the first time

 

     At this stage of the process we now have a fully finished mold ready for casting, however silicone molds have quite a short working life as resin is notoriously harsh on them, we work on an average of 20 casts before a mold dies and has to be remade completely from scratch meaning, unfortunately, the mold making stage is an ongoing process.

 

     However, with that said, we now have a mold that is ready for the casting stage of the process.

 

     So, onto casting. 

 

    To cast a model the mold first needs to be treated with a release agent before it is closed up and secured so that the two halves stay in place and don't shift during casting. The mold is then taken into our casting room and the Polyurethane resin is weighed out, mixed thoroughly and poured into the mold via the vents created by the sprue from earlier. Resin cures by exothermic reaction meaning once the two parts are mixed they react to each other by heating up, causing the molecules to change, drying and hardening the resin. This happens within a very short time frame so once the resin is mixed we need to act quickly. When the molds have been filled with resin we need to remove any air that has become trapped inside, if we don't remove this air the final cast may not be good enough to pass quality inspection and will need to be discarded, this is known as a 'miscast'. The first step in removing trapped air is to place the filled mold into our vacuum camber so that we can pull any trapped air from out of the mold, it is quite common to find that resin can't find it's way into very small parts of the mold, such as finger tips and weapon points, so we need to give it a hand with vacuum degassing by displacing that trapped air with resin. Once the molds have been vacuum degassed all of the trapped air will have been removed, however there will still be tiny air bubbles remaining within the resin itself that have been introduced when the resin was mixed, to remove these air bubbles the molds need to be placed into one of our pressure tanks, the tank is then filled with air which crushes the bubbles to microscopic levels. At this stage the mold is completely filled and is left in the pressure tank to fully cure so that the air bubbles cannot return, we then repeat this process and fill all of our pressure tanks with resin filled molds. We have ten pressure tanks in total and the process of filling them all takes around 2 hours, we do this four times a day.

 

image.png.a5478ef9f3b805f959379ffc7c2647ba.png

     The pressure tanks within our casting room

 

     Once the resin has had time to cure the molds can be removed from the tanks and the casts can be removed from the molds, this process is called 'demolding'. The demolding stage can take as long, if not longer, than the casting stage as the parts are very delicate at this point and it's very easy to damage either a cast part or a silicone mold if we are not careful. Any parts that are damaged or miscast are discarded and the remaining parts move on to the final stage of the process, the molds are then prepped and left ready for another round of casting. 

 

     The final Stage of the production process is to inspect each part by eye to check for any defects or damage, we only want our customers to receive perfect models so any that don't pass this inspection are also discarded, the remaining parts are then cleaning and finished before being collected together and packaged up ready to send out to backers

 

     I think that covers pretty much everything, I know this was a long read but I hope it has given you a little insight and a peek behind the curtain at what we do to produce resin model kits. Sadly BrokenToad isn't a huge company with a large factory, we are a small two man team and we take what we do very seriously because, ultimately, we believe this enables us to focus and produce the absolute best models we possibly can, and we only ever want our customers to receive the best quality models possible.

 

 

 Neat stuff.

 

 

 

 

::o:

 

Wow. Well, no wonder resin costs more! 

 

On 5/12/2021 at 7:51 PM, WhiteWulfe said:

Smoking will kill you.  Bacon will also kill you.  But smoking bacon will cure it... 

 

This is going on my "daily jokes for my office" list. :lol:

 

19 minutes ago, ManvsMini said:

Ever used Post-It Notes? Thank Spencer Silver, the National Inventors Hall of Fame chemist who invented the strong-but-too-weak-yet-reusable adhesive used on them while at 3M. Sadly, he has passed away at age 80.

 

I thank him every day; I use them EXTENSIVELY at my work, and am very grateful for their existence. 

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D 

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58 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

I've noticed a strong correlation between where someone lives, and how far they consider a comfortable day trip.  Here in Iowa, and back when I lived in Colorado, 120 miles (200km) is a common day trip for many people.  When I was stationed in Australia, the 365km trip to the next nearest town was something a lot of my fellow shipmates did just to go to a bigger club than the base had. 

Yet I've had arguments with customers in Hartford CT who were unwilling to drive to Springfield MA to pick up parts because "it takes too long and I'd have to cross a state line!"

 

Sounds to me like it's time to institute an "afraid to go outside" surcharge.

We drive 425 miles plus one way [700 km+], and usually towing a trailer, across deserts and through the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range between Victorville, Ca. and Stagecoach, Nv. and that's just a comfortable day trip.

IMNSHO, any trip that may be accomplished in 9 hours or less, including one fuel and one meal stop is an easy day trip.

Jack Palance Voice  /ON  "City People"

Jack Palance Voice /OFF

GEM

Addendum:  At our new place it's 15 miles to the nearest full grocery store [a Kroger brand called Smith's], and 13 miles the other way to the nearest Post Office.

You might say that we are "out in the country".

GEM

Edited by Green Eyed Monster
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I only consider it a "day trip" if I can get there and back in (mostly) daylight hours.  250mi (~400km) to St Louis is a day trip.  We can drive out, sight-see, have a nice dinner, and drive home and not be exhausted. 

 

Reaper is 9-10 hour trip (~500mi or 800km), depending on how long we stop for lunch and whether or not I-35 has a pile-up.  But since it requires an overnight stay before we return, I don't consider it a "day trip. "

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

Sounds to me like it's time to institute an "afraid to go outside" surcharge.

We drive 425 miles plus one way [700 km+], and usually towing a trailer, across deserts and through the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range between Victorville, Ca. and Stagecoach, Nv. and that's just a comfortable day trip.

IMNSHO, any trip that may be accomplished in 9 hours or less, including one fuel and one meal stop is an easy day trip.

Jack Palance Voice  /ON  "City People"

Jack Palance Voice /OFF

GEM

Addendum:  At our new place it's 15 miles to the nearest full grocery store [a Kroger brand called Smith's], and 13 miles the other way to the nearest Post Office.

You might say that we are "out in the country".

GEM

For 'day trip' my definition involves getting home at the other end of the day ;-)

If I don't need to get home at the other end, then your definition is entirely accurate
We're 15 miles from our nearest grocery store, but nearest full grocery store is closer to 30, with the nearest full post office (not just branch run out of a newsagency or only open 4 hours a week at the most inconvenient times) about the same

And I'm pretty sure you're actually more rural than we are (services in this country are just crap unless you're in a city)

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2 hours ago, ratsmitglied said:

Should I be worried that I consider anything within 300km to be comfortable day-trip distance?

I'm kind of torn between "Nah. The Path Is the Goal." and "What? That's barely 2 hours on a German highway!" here, so I think I'll just point out Chuck Norris would consider it a comfortable stroll.

 

1 hour ago, Glitterwolf said:

Venco Menthol Kruisdrop, very addictive!!!

Yes! Them's the ones. Oh, and I'll have some Dubbel Zoute, too. Even though I'm pretty sure my doctor would say I shouldn't, if he wasn't what passes for normal in these parts, i.e. someone quite certain licorice is sweet.

 

1 hour ago, Green Eyed Monster said:

IMNSHO, any trip that may be accomplished in 9 hours or less, including one fuel and one meal stop is an easy day trip.

Well, I would be using a European car and be on German highways for most of the trip, so I guess Venlo qualifies.

 

If I'm allowed to use anti-vehicular weapons to dissolve traffic jams, anyways.

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34 minutes ago, ratsmitglied said:

For 'day trip' my definition involves getting home at the other end of the day ;-)

If I don't need to get home at the other end, then your definition is entirely accurate
We're 15 miles from our nearest grocery store, but nearest full grocery store is closer to 30, with the nearest full post office (not just branch run out of a newsagency or only open 4 hours a week at the most inconvenient times) about the same

And I'm pretty sure you're actually more rural than we are (services in this country are just crap unless you're in a city)

We're connected to commercial power for electricity [with a large generator for backup in the barn] have a largish propane tank outside the back door and are on well water.  Going to have to lay 200ft+ of cable in order to get internet service into the house.

There's a cell/microwave tower within line of sight because the tower is 75' high, and the local vegetation is knee high sagebrush and pinion pine, plus some cottonwood trees.

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