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BardicDave

Bones Werewolf: Advice Requested (77464)

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@Glitterwolfs suggested some pretty good videos, but I'd like to add this one, which is how I learned how to wet blend fur

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mdIAU-0uciI

 

This video is from Reapers Anne Foerster, the fur tutorial starts about 15 minutes in. 

 

Regarding your wolf, I think he looks great! His face is very mean looking ::o:

Edited by Kuroneko
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I like the werwolf, too. I can't add anything to the video list, but overall I think the drybrush worked very well. While it is often seen as a "beginners" technique it is an important tool and I use it often, despite using other "advanced" techniques (not that they are really that advanced).

 

I think more contrast is always a good way to go and getting control back. Washes and drybrushing are blunt instruments, I assume with some more control you can add highlights and shadows more precisely and push contrast and smooth out blends.

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I'm hardly what you'd call an "advanced" painter, but I've recently worked on a mini with a large scaled area (dewback from Imperial Assault), and while I normally don't drybrush, I found I just couldn't get away from it.  It was the right tool for the job.

 

As I thought about it, there wasn't a real reason why I avoided it other than it just felt odd after not having done it in so long.  I'd better get over it, though, I've got wookiees to revisit.

 

You are right about the beastie's face, though.  It's great!

 

This is Kenai (sounds like "Keen Eye").  He's the alpha for our local animal park's pack, and getting to be an old man these days.  This is an older picture (he's faded a lot recently, and the blacks have turned to browns and greys).  

DSC04275.JPG.afa754f4ac2c871ba131201ad15f39bc.JPG

 

If I were to offer a critique of your werewolf, it would be that the fur is too monochromatic over most of the body.  Kenai is just an example, and patterns vary, but notice that he's got a light blaze on his chest and that the fur fades to grey around his paws.

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So I went back and added a bit more brown. Still not super happy with it, but I think it's a small improvement.IMG_5724.thumb.jpg.418e31f0ee864a9b758c1aaa6530674a.jpg

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It all depends on the look you are going for. You do have a great looking black wolf there.

 

The trick to using drybrushing effectively is to wipe alot of paint off the brush. (Alot!) and to vary the pressure on the brush when brushing over the mini, according to how much colour you want. Gradually building layers is key. 

 

If you want the black wolf to look more naturalistic try using some (very) dark colours in between the layers of greys. Dark blue or dark green, even dark purple or dark red adds a spot of naturalistic to black fur. the brown you have used is a step towards this.

 

ie, black base coat, dark grey drybrush, a drybrush here and there with dark blue, then the mid grey and ligher greys.

Or you can mix a spot of blue, green whatever into some of the greys you drybrush with.

 

If you want the wolf to look more greyish than blackish, start with a more heavy drybrush of grey onto the black undercoat and take it lighter in steps.

Note that many grey wolves have hints or even areas of yellows  / sand/ beige here and there. 

 

Also, note that many animals have a lighter underside / belly and inside of the legs than the top of their coats.

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1 hour ago, Maledrakh said:

It all depends on the look you are going for. You do have a great looking black wolf there.

 

The trick to using drybrushing effectively is to wipe alot of paint off the brush. (Alot!) and to vary the pressure on the brush when brushing over the mini, according to how much colour you want. Gradually building layers is key. 

 

If you want the black wolf to look more naturalistic try using some (very) dark colours in between the layers of greys. Dark blue or dark green, even dark purple or dark red adds a spot of naturalistic to black fur. the brown you have used is a step towards this.

 

ie, black base coat, dark grey drybrush, a drybrush here and there with dark blue, then the mid grey and ligher greys.

Or you can mix a spot of blue, green whatever into some of the greys you drybrush with.

 

If you want the wolf to look more greyish than blackish, start with a more heavy drybrush of grey onto the black undercoat and take it lighter in steps.

Note that many grey wolves have hints or even areas of yellows  / sand/ beige here and there. 

 

Also, note that many animals have a lighter underside / belly and inside of the legs than the top of their coats.

 

Thanks! This is all extremely helpful. I just spent 5 minutes lightly drybrushing on a few different colours, and already he looks a lot more interesting.IMG_5740.thumb.jpg.03488b0b4f50ced4cab4508dcaf03d55.jpg

 

Edited by BardicDave
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Awesome,

 

One thing though, while you're still working on something it should be posted in Works in Progress.

When doen it's a Show Off.

 

That being said, I like the improvement.

And the face is awesome, you've captured the look, he's sneaking around for his next meal.

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