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72moonglum

Nerdly fun fact

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So just as a by the way that I just found out on Instagram, for my last miniature I used a #drow hashtag, and then I went to look for Drow elves essentially, but when I went to #drow, the majority of the 386K posts there refer to people drawing/drowing, in other words hundreds of thousands of posts of people that don’t know how to spell “draw”.

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Just proves what Morgan Freeman said, "We need to start underpaying politicians and over paying teachers. Maybe we will get better students and fewer stupid laws."

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3 hours ago, Disciple of Sakura said:

I can't say anything that probably wouldn't get this thrown into beekeepers...

Didn’t write it to make a a controversial statement, it was just a casual comment.

I don’t think I even have access to beekeeping, and have been on this forum for well over a decade.

Edited by 72moonglum
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1 hour ago, Corsair said:

Just proves what Morgan Freeman said, "We need to start underpaying politicians and over paying teachers. Maybe we will get better students and fewer stupid laws."

 

full?d=1538275450

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Seeing the general proficiency on most fanfiction sites... not surprised...   

 

Another fun fact;

Whenever anyone on Reddit writes 'English is not my primary language' you know that the post will be better than most.  

 

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1 hour ago, Gadgetman! said:

Seeing the general proficiency on most fanfiction sites... not surprised...   

 

Another fun fact;

Whenever anyone on Reddit writes 'English is not my primary language' you know that the post will be better than most.  

 

 

My adviser and group manager are editors on a mineralogy journal. They get a lot of international submissions where English is not the author's first language. The editors say these ones are often easier to correct than the English as first language authors who are bad writers, because the authors who have English as a second language have very formulaic (thus understandable) errors. The native speakers have much more random and confusing errors. Not true 100% of the time, because at a certain point even formulaic errors are too far off to know the meaning of a phrase properly, but usually that's not the case.

 

In grading papers I see that too. Sometimes the grammar and word choice is such that it is word salad. Often it is just a certain set of errors that aren't severe enough to impact meaning of the phrase.

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Many, many years ago I used to do some editing for amateur writers... 

(Furry fiction)   

I always warned them that I would NOT be gentle. 

When I came across 'common' issues such as we're/where and similar, punctuation/capitalisation errors I would mark the first few issues of each and write a note explaining the correct usage.   

The few that got angry at the level of 'hacking' I did were all native English speakers. 

The same with the common issues. Non-native speakers would take my notes to heart and remember them for the next chaper or story. 

The rest might correct the issues in that chapter/story, but then be back to doing the same errors in their next submission.   

Some just fixed the couple of issues I had marked and ignore the rest.

 

One had just submitted the edited chapter without reading it...   So he posted it with all my comments... 

 

I no longer do any editing for anyone. 

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

One had just submitted the edited chapter without reading it...   So he posted it with all my comments... 

Ouch, that part must have gone over splendidly...

 

I also think that that particular segment seems to want an editor to look things over and provide praise, instead of what an editor is supposed to do, which is, well, double check things, make sure things are correct, and point out every single mistake that's been made...  And I know I'm missing a bunch of things an editor actually takes care of.  Treated fairly, no matter how pained a writer's pride is, a good editor is an insanely valuable resource.

 

Editing is something I hate soooo much, because editing my own stuff requires a very specific mindset, which explains why none of the fiction I've written has gone any further than the initial rough draft...

 

EDIT: The other thing I find so odd is that so many seem to think that an editor will fix every single mistake, especially spelling.  No, you has chellspecker, use that and your own eyes for your initial pass...  Also, unless they're rather familiar with your topic, as well as specific writing style, an editor isn't clairvoyant, they aren't psychic either.

Edited by WhiteWulfe
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6 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

Many, many years ago I used to do some editing for amateur writers... 

(Furry fiction)   

I always warned them that I would NOT be gentle. 

When I came across 'common' issues such as we're/where and similar, punctuation/capitalisation errors I would mark the first few issues of each and write a note explaining the correct usage.   

The few that got angry at the level of 'hacking' I did were all native English speakers. 

The same with the common issues. Non-native speakers would take my notes to heart and remember them for the next chaper or story. 

The rest might correct the issues in that chapter/story, but then be back to doing the same errors in their next submission.   

Some just fixed the couple of issues I had marked and ignore the rest.

 

One had just submitted the edited chapter without reading it...   So he posted it with all my comments... 

 

I no longer do any editing for anyone. 

 

 


Nobody likes being told that they are incorrectly using their own written language.

Particularly when you're right about it.

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Eh, I always hated being in a writing course and passing my essay to a classmate and then we edit each other. I am a decent but not outstanding writer. And I'm honest - the goal was to edit, so I brought out the red pen and let it go. Then I'd get comments back on my essay and have almost nothing. Either the classmate was too timid to red pen me, or didn't see errors (and there totally were errors). So I felt like that elfhole who was mean, while getting no feedback myself.

 

When I applied to the group I'm with now, they needed me to write a scholarship application in about 4 days. Not long of a deadline to work with. But Group Editor was there to help! So I wrote something up and sent it. She edited it. I got it back and she had actually red penned it. More than anyone else had. Talked to her and she said she tried to go gentle at first... I just told her to RED PEN ME HARDER and then we got going with super nitpicky red penning and editing.

 

It is SO AWESOME to have an editor actually rip my work to shreds. People really should stop being upset about editing. Lots to learn from it and it makes a better final product.

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23 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

'English is not my primary language' you know that the post will be better than most. 

 

Having lived abroad for a few years in high school (and maybe others who have done so have encountered this?), I noticed that, even if you speak the native tongue at a decent proficiency, if people who are learning/learned English sense that you are a native speaker of English they are eager to engage you in it so that they can practice. They have a desire to practice what they spent time learning, whereas here in the States most people only take foreign language courses because high school and college have those requirements. It's the old "I'm never going to use this, so after this is done I'll just forget it" mentality.

 

Personally, I would learn a dozen languages if I thought I could keep them all straight in my head.

 

25 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

Talked to her and she said she tried to go gentle at first... I just told her to RED PEN ME HARDER and then we got going with super nitpicky red penning and editing.

 

You make that whole editing experience sound so dirty... :lol:

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5 hours ago, Cyradis said:

Talked to her and she said she tried to go gentle at first... I just told her to RED PEN ME HARDER and then we got going with super nitpicky red penning and editing.

 

It is SO AWESOME to have an editor actually rip my work to shreds. People really should stop being upset about editing. Lots to learn from it and it makes a better final product.

 

This reminds me of when the girls or Mrs. Strawhat would have me review a paper for an assignment.

 

I'm not exactly what you'd call a grammarian, but before I even looked at a paper I clarified how "enthusiastic" I was to be and reiterated that my editing was an attempt to help them get the best possible grades.  They didn't always appreciate my efforts when it came time for rewrites, but they never complained after the papers were graded.

 

5 hours ago, ManvsMini said:

Having lived abroad for a few years in high school (and maybe others who have done so have encountered this?), I noticed that, even if you speak the native tongue at a decent proficiency, if people who are learning/learned English sense that you are a native speaker of English they are eager to engage you in it so that they can practice. They have a desire to practice what they spent time learning, whereas here in the States most people only take foreign language courses because high school and college have those requirements. It's the old "I'm never going to use this, so after this is done I'll just forget it" mentality.

 

I've never understood others' enthusiasm for learning English.  It doesn't help that I've often thought of the process (even as a native speaker) as being similar to learning the deepest secrets of C'thulhu.  The more you learn, the crazier you become, eventually succumbing to madness and being otherwise ill suited for polite company.

 

Unfortunately, the lack of usefulness is true for many Americans.  While I could quite easily use some Spanish in my area, you're not likely to hear anything other than English unless in a restaurant serving "exotic" cuisine.  This isn't iron clad, though, as I hear French and possibly Ewe or Kabiye, at work on a regular basis.

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