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GodOfCheese

Just when you thought it was safe to try epoxy resin...

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You did great!

It's a beautiful piece.

 

Poor Sharky, still hungry even after death..

 

As for resin, I use the Greenstuffworld UV Resin.

Pour the bottle, let dry in the sun or under an UV light for half an hour.

Done and done..

 

 

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That is a damn fine effort!  One of the best underwater bases I've seen.

 

Can I ask what you used to contain the resin?  I always find round bases tricky to seal (I have some round containment moulds that perfectly fit most standard sized bases, but they are only a cm deep). 

 

5 hours ago, GodOfCheese said:

It turns out that epoxy resin is a harsh mistress.  Like a cruel Charybdis, she is unforgiving, yet somehow bubbly and only visible from certain angles.

 

I'm certainly no expert, but the best way I have found to eliminate all the bubbles is to do multiple shallow pours over time, rather than a single big deep pour.  After each layer I run a jet flame lighter over the surface which will pop any bubbles quickly and easily (You typically have to do this 2-3 times over the course of the first hour after each pour, as some of the bubbles rise very slowly).  It takes a bit longer, but is often worth the extra effort.

 

I've also heard that pouring from height works, but I'm not that brave, I know I'd get it everywhere!

 

Quote

Originally my plan was to do water-effects on the surface to make it look like the shark is moving through, but the curvature of the side would mean that the rest of the shark wouldn't be visible at all, so I present my experiment in resinous necromancy: the zombie shark. 

 

I am not familiar with water effects, or why it would obscure the rest of your shark.  But I like to use a product called clearfix (If you can get hold of it, its a UK adhiesive that comes in a massive tube that requires a caulking gun), mixed with a little isopropyl alchohol it can be brushed onto the surface of your resin to produce waves and ripples.  As it starts to dry it can be manipulated without losing its shape, making it easy to create waves and ripples.  It is also 100% clear.  LukeAPS has quite an in depth youtube video on using the stuff which I am sure I could track down if it is of interest to you. 

 

Here is a river I did a few months back, using the stuff to create little waves where from the down hill stream hits the river, as well as the ripples coming off the reeds to give the impression of flowing water.IMG_1756.thumb.JPG.01e55ffbbf63af4e3b8e060cd40fa11c.JPG

 

 

Edited by Dan S
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I think the underwater base looks great. The few bubbles work in your favour. Who says the don't come from life in the corals. The small shells really add to it and the shark looks suitably decomposed. I think adding some fish might have been a nice touch, but that would have required multiple pours.

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Very cool! I did a reaper mini diorama with a piece of wood in a piece of epoxy resin that was a test piece for a resin table that I built a few years back. Fun stuff!

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On 7/21/2020 at 11:41 PM, Glitterwolf said:

As for resin, I use the Greenstuffworld UV Resin.

Pour the bottle, let dry in the sun or under an UV light for half an hour.

Done and done..

 

 

Oh wow, that sounds a ton better than the six-hour cure time I had with my resin.  I'm thinking of some other watery stuff so I will check that out!

 

On 7/22/2020 at 1:16 AM, Dan S said:

Can I ask what you used to contain the resin?  I always find round bases tricky to seal (I have some round containment moulds that perfectly fit most standard sized bases, but they are only a cm deep). 

 

I wrapped the base in wide painter's tape, which I don't recommend at all.  I figured that the outward pressure from the resin would more or less maintain the cylindrical shape. It turns out that this is only true for the shallowest part of the pour though (you can see that it's not circular toward the top... it kind of distorts off to one side).  The tape came off really easily, but it really lent itself to stippling along the curved surface.  I think I was sanding and polishing it for almost a week, and the base still smells of auto polish (why the bottom is still unpainted-- I don't think the paint will stick to it yet).

 

On 7/22/2020 at 1:16 AM, Dan S said:

I'm certainly no expert, but the best way I have found to eliminate all the bubbles is to do multiple shallow pours over time, rather than a single big deep pour.  After each layer I run a jet flame lighter over the surface which will pop any bubbles quickly and easily (You typically have to do this 2-3 times over the course of the first hour after each pour, as some of the bubbles rise very slowly).  It takes a bit longer, but is often worth the extra effort.

 

I had read that deep pours can also cause cracking, but I missed the part about pouring slowly :-(  This guy was like six pours over several days (I'm sure FamilyOfCheese was getting quite sick of hearing alarms go off to tell me to go pour the next layer), but I was probably pouring too fast or not mixing long enough.  

 

On 7/22/2020 at 1:16 AM, Dan S said:

I've also heard that pouring from height works, but I'm not that brave, I know I'd get it everywhere!

 

Oooh, if I'd known that I'd have tried it -- this base was so wide that I really would not have to worry about spilling.  Next base will be small though so it'll be a while before I can take this advice! :-)

 

On 7/22/2020 at 1:16 AM, Dan S said:

I am not familiar with water effects, or why it would obscure the rest of your shark.  But I like to use a product called clearfix (If you can get hold of it, its a UK adhiesive that comes in a massive tube that requires a caulking gun), mixed with a little isopropyl alchohol it can be brushed onto the surface of your resin to produce waves and ripples.  As it starts to dry it can be manipulated without losing its shape, making it easy to create waves and ripples.  It is also 100% clear.  LukeAPS has quite an in depth youtube video on using the stuff which I am sure I could track down if it is of interest to you. 

 

My assumption for water effects was that creating ripples in the water would bend surface light (like real water does).  This would distort the view from the top down, which is currently crystal clear.  I'd have been okay with that if the view from the sides wasn't also distorted.

 

Next time I'll try to do this with a rectangular base, so the side-viewing angles are more visible, and the view from the top can be waves or ripples without fear of distortion.  I'm not brave enough to try it on this model yet :-)

 

On 7/22/2020 at 1:16 AM, Dan S said:

Here is a river I did a few months back, using the stuff to create little waves where from the down hill stream hits the river, as well as the ripples coming off the reeds to give the impression of flowing water.IMG_1756.thumb.JPG.01e55ffbbf63af4e3b8e060cd40fa11c.JPG

 

This is gorgeous!  I'll definitely try to hunt down that video.  I really want to do some churning water effects with my minis.  

 

On 7/22/2020 at 3:37 AM, Peithetairos said:

I think the underwater base looks great. The few bubbles work in your favour. Who says the don't come from life in the corals. The small shells really add to it and the shark looks suitably decomposed. I think adding some fish might have been a nice touch, but that would have required multiple pours.

 

Thanks!  I wanted to do fish, but couldn't think of a way to get them to sit upright in the resin. They seemed like they'd just flop over and look weird.  For larger things (like the shark) I can suspend them by a fin, then remove the suspension on the next pour when the model is safely trapped in resin, but little things are harder :-(

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1 hour ago, GodOfCheese said:

Thanks!  I wanted to do fish, but couldn't think of a way to get them to sit upright in the resin. They seemed like they'd just flop over and look weird.  For larger things (like the shark) I can suspend them by a fin, then remove the suspension on the next pour when the model is safely trapped in resin, but little things are harder :-(

 

If you have UV resin at hand or epoxy glue you can just fix them down upright, then pour and embed them.

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To avoid bubbles you can use a vacuum chamber to draw the air out of the resin before pouring it into the mold. 

Another trick is to heat the resin slightly. It flows easier, and bubble can much more easily rise to the top and disappear. 

 

Or so I understand. I haven't actually tried it myself, yet...

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