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RatMat Scenics: Forest, Ruins, Wharf, and Warehouse Packs


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https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/rattrap/ratmat-scenics-forest-ruins-wharf-and-warehouse-packs?ref=discovery_category_newest

 

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I've been running, playing, and creating RPGs and miniature games for decades. After being involved in this world for so long, I recently wondered just how much time I've spent loading, transporting, and setting up terrain for conventions, store demos, and regular game nights. It was...a lot. Sometimes you just want to get to the game! I've also heard time and again that people are interested in RPGs and miniature games, but don't have the time to create or paint terrain or the space to store it. Why should that be an obstacle to great gaming? With ease, cost, and limited storage space in mind, Rattrap Productions is excited to share our RatMat Scenic Packs--full landscapes composed of 2mm punchboard and sized for 25 mm to 32 mm figures. RatMat Scenic Packs are designed to assemble/ disassemble quickly and easily, store in a minimum of space, and cost a fraction of what you could spend on buying or building your own bulky terrain.  

093fd0ceebe70bda3d9aae0faabe9459_origina Our Forest pack will cover an entire 2x2 battle map, yet breaks down to fit in a few small, resealable plastic bags. I actually store 5 entire Scenic Pack sets of in a single cube of a Kallax shelf with room for a few more.

I am so excited about and confident in these packs that I wanted to provide potential backers with proof of concept—I created our initial set, the Forest Pack, and paid to have it manufactured and shipped. I wanted to be absolutely sure that our production and shipping partners could handle both aspects in an efficient manner and that the finished product would meet my expectations, as a lifelong gamer with high standards. I have been thrilled with the results. The Forest Pack—composed of the same material and with the same ideals as the other packs—is sturdy, can be quickly assembled/disassembled, and stored in practically no space. The Forest Pack will be an option to pick in our Pledge Manager (though it will ship to backers with the remainder of the packs).

fe2e0764ff8ab6127a288e2b26413bda_origina RatMat Scenics: Forest Pack I
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Each Scenic Pack will contain 5-7 sheets of 2mm punchboard. All pieces are printed on both sides and sized for 25mm to 32mm miniatures, with the goal to provide enough terrain per scenario in each pack. This Kickstarter is to expand on the existing Forest Pack, by adding the Ruins I, Wharf, and Warehouse packs. In the Pledge Manager you will also be able to select our already released Forest Pack I (it will ship at the same time as any other packs you select). 

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We're excited by the potential items we may also add into packs along the way, based on engagement and input from our community. If we start going well beyond the stretch goals--don't worry!--there are so many potential packs that can be added to the Rattrap Scenic Packs that you could end up with enough scenic pieces to cover your whole campaign. 

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