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    • By MoonglowMinis
      Couldn't find a better thread to post this in.  Has anyone else ever had mold grow on their minis?
       
      I have a set of bones that have been sitting around for about two year. They were super glued to a reaper base. Baking soda and super glue were used to blend the integrated base into the round base. There's also a layer of cheap craft paint as primer.
       
      These guys have been sitting on my painting table in a former sun-room for about two years. 
       
      I noticed the bases had yellowed a bit, which I've begun to notice on some of my other older bases using baking soda as a basing material. But when I checked on them I noticed small fuzzy looking orange tufts. 
       
      I can only assume this is mold.
       
      The only things I could think of to cause this are the baking soda or the water used to clean my brush before priming. 
       
      Has anyone else seen this?
       
       

    • By TGP
      Our Anti-Hero Rictur Diehn the Assassin (2430) has decided to build a Wet Palette**
       
       
      PARTS LIST:
      Peanut Butter Jar Lid, 90mm, culled from recycle bin Peanut Butter Jar Lid, 85mm, culled from recycle bin Paper Towels, Bounty Brand, nicked from kitchen Parchment Paper, Reynolds Brand, nicked from kitchen Copper Wire, Solid, 3mm OD, purchased from Home Depot for $0.63 / foot  
      QUANTITIES (In Order):
      (1), (1), (4 half sheets), (2 layers), (10--12 inches (255-300mm) )  
       
      #Searchwords
      TGPTGP;  acid washed; Palette; Recycle Bin; Scratchbuilt; Plastic Lids; Copper
      **With some off camera help from Pendrake The Griffon
    • By Kev!
      Howdy,
       
      Toxic, if you must know...
       


       
      Mushy,
      Kev!
    • By Rigel
      A while back I posted some Shroom Dudes I'd sculpted, and noted one of them had a bunch of little shroom fruiting bodies sticking out all over. I mentioned how this was done, but a step-by-step can't hurt. You'll need a mini, sewing pins with flattish but slightly domed heads, a very fine drill, some pliers, and superglue.

      Here's a long-unused Manes demon I got in a WotC grab bag, and a much-more-recently-acquired Nolzur's Myconid Adult. Let's call 'em Cletus and Boletus. Cletus will become a Spore Servant.Boletus will get an upgrade.



      Clamp your mini down firmly. FIRMLY!  Otherwise the drill bit may try to skitter, and if there's one thing you DON'T want skittering, it's a rotating blade.
      Now, get a very very fine drill bit and drill some holes in 'em! What angle should those holes be? It's graceful if they're more vertical than 90°, but you can make it work with most angles.
       

      Next, get as many pins as you have holes drilled. These pins will be your long-stemmed mushrooms.
      It's probably smart to gauge the angle of the hole by inserting a straight pin into each hole before you begin the next step.  And it's always a good idea to be a smarter crafter than I!



      Then, BEND them pins. You want smooth curves, but *not* consistent lengths or uniform shapes. 
      Mushrooms do not require light to grow, but the taller they are, the further their spores can disperse. 




      Now, get that superglue and glue those pins into the holes you've made for them. I advise starting at the top and working down. For verisimilitude, you want to avoid uniform heights and parallel curves (and indeed, straight lines at all).



      Then slap some paint onto those fungal stems and caps, and hey presto!

    • By Rigel
      Maybe this should have gone in the Sculpting thread, but I didn't make a build log when I sculpted these about four years ago. It was my first game DMing, a 5e homebrew, and enigmatic mycelial conspiracies played a large part. At this point I only knew the FLGS as a source of minis, and they didn't have any myconids. So I made do. One of them is based loosely off of bracket fungus and one off of amanita toadstools.
      Showing them off now because a) I picked up some Nolzur/Wizkids new Myconid Adult sculpts to go along with them, and b) I'm seeing so many wonderful mushroom-folk on the forums and love jumping in front of bandwagons.  

      The sculpting was ham-fisted and the painting leaves much to be desired, but I am proud of one innovation that you can use for your myconids: for that enokitake effect, get a bunch of sewing pins, clip to different lengths, and bend them into a gentle curve near the cut or pointy end.  Cluster as necessary.








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