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Venun

OSL (Object Source Lighting)

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Hi all,

 

With OSL being such a difficult thing to start on, yet can bring such amazing results when performed properly, I thought I'd create a general topic for all questions and tips OSL related.

For me, I've tried it a few times but haven't been happy yet on the results.

I'm looking to try it again soon. I picked up a few commissions, where some (minor) OSL is also requested if possible.

 

What has been your experience with OSL? Which guides helped you the best? What method is the key to your victory on this subject?

All hints and videolinks are welcome!

 

All obtained tips and hints are under the Spoiler tag

 
Quote

David Diamondstone did an online class at Reapercon Live and it is available on Reaper's twitch channel. I believe it is beginner friendly. I am including a link to the VOD here.
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLgHIcw7XP8&list=PLgWoQe8KGU_b1k3xvAVxV3YXV_eJ0VDt3&index=30
https://www.twitch.tv/videos/731355309?filter=all&sort=time
 

 

 

Quote

 1) To sell the effect, there must be some contrast regarding the surface the light is on. A figure painted to look like it is already in sunlight, like you typically paint, won't do well with much OSL because there isn't much to light up. Think of shining a flashlight on someone in the sun - not much point to it.

2) Plan for OSL from the beginning. Let the "source" guide where you put highlights and shadows. Always keep that in mind as you go.

3) The "source" should be the brightest part of the figure.

4) The intensity of light diminishes further away from the source. If you just have a blast of the lighting color in a sphere around it, it is going to look sloppy and weird.

5) The path of light can be blocked by other surfaces. Imagine a straight line from the source to the place you are painting. Did the line get there uninterrupted? If yes, then it gets illuminated, according to distance from the source. If not, it is in shadow. You can sortof break this sometimes for "rule of cool" but not in any major way. More like "that one wrinkle could use just a tiny highlight" can be okay.

I really like painting OSL, but it takes time to do it and planning. Once you get into it, then your overall painting skill goes up. It is really about imagining new light placement. After that it can fall into place pretty well.

 
 

Edited by Venun
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1 hour ago, Glitterwolf said:

I have tried it once,

I doubt it was a succes.

 

 

Servan OSL.JPG

Servan 2.JPG

Servan back.JPG

What IS that guy!?  I think I need one!

 

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7 minutes ago, BLZeebub said:

What IS that guy!?  I think I need one!

 

 

Freebooter miniatures - Vampire Servant, I think he's OOP but you can find him on the bay of evil..

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This is a topic I've wanted to get into and try out myself but, to be honest, it's a bit daunting.  Perhaps we can eventually collect into info to have a pinned message linking to resources.

 

The problem I run into is that for OSL all of the things I find already are starting at an intermediate or advanced level.  It would be nice if there was an equivalent of "OSL for Dummy's" tutorial for those of us who have zero foundation.  Essentially, an ultra beginner resource to get us off the ground before we go for the more advanced stuff.

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5 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

I have tried it once,

I doubt it was a succes.

 

At least you've tried it, right? That is a success in itself, and the first step towards mastering OSL.

 

In Marike Reimer's Darksword DVD she had some good tips about OSL, but definitely less of a beginner approach. I'll rewatch that section again in the near future to see if I can pull any beginner gems out of it. And go through my stack of other dvds and see what shakes out.

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1) To sell the effect, there must be some contrast regarding the surface the light is on. A figure painted to look like it is already in sunlight, like you typically paint, won't do well with much OSL because there isn't much to light up. Think of shining a flashlight on someone in the sun - not much point to it.

 

2) Plan for OSL from the beginning. Let the "source" guide where you put highlights and shadows. Always keep that in mind as you go.

 

3) The "source" should be the brightest part of the figure.

 

4) The intensity of light diminishes further away from the source. If you just have a blast of the lighting color in a sphere around it, it is going to look sloppy and weird.

 

5) The path of light can be blocked by other surfaces. Imagine a straight line from the source to the place you are painting. Did the line get there uninterrupted? If yes, then it gets illuminated, according to distance from the source. If not, it is in shadow. You can sortof break this sometimes for "rule of cool" but not in any major way. More like "that one wrinkle could use just a tiny highlight" can be okay.

 

I really like painting OSL, but it takes time to do it and planning. Once you get into it, then your overall painting skill goes up. It is really about imagining new light placement. After that it can fall into place pretty well.

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Great tips so far! I'm definitely going to watch that David Diamondstone class.

Does the VOD on Twitch require a twitch sub?

Update: found the YouTube link too, added in main post.

 

@Cyradis I'm quite sure you're right, if you can see where the light will hit, and where the shadows will be, it's a path to succes.

For me personally I'm always having issues seeing where the light will hit, and where shadows should be.

It's a skill to train I suppose.

 

I've added the hints gathered so far in the main post, hidden under a spoiler tag (so it won't get to large when scrolling past).

Edited by Venun
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For me figuring the location of lighting is about visualizing that straight line from the source, and seeing where it intersects with the rest of the model. If you can paint "in sunlight", you can probably do this too. But normally, you're thinking of light coming generically "from above". Trying to think in a shifted perspective is what helps the most, and planning it from the start. Don't try to think of normal lighting directions, only think of the source.

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OSL the simplest version, from my Thorns of the Briar Queen post:

https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/84772-maledrakhs-thorns-of-the-briar-queen

 

190128-wu-nightvaultthorns-of-the-briar- 190128-wu-nightvaultthorns-of-the-briar- 190128-wu-nightvaultthorns-of-the-briar- 190128-wu-nightvaultthorns-of-the-briar-

Varclav the Cruel  OSL (object source lighting) is actually really easy to do. First paint the mini as normal, then the light source (candle flame here). Then hit the bits that would light up with an appropriate colour. Yellow in this case. Vary the colour shade towards brighter the closer, and darker the further away from the light source you are. make sure to not get colour in where there should be shadow. And Bob's your uncle!

 

 

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Here are my examples - some pics better than others.

image.thumb.png.00f00b7571fe2216002f01a48faa610a.png

20191007_204610.jpg

For some reason my goblin with a torch won't load - bah. If you want pics of that one too I'll try another time.

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334797319_Wizard-BackwithOSL.thumb.jpg.4ec4d279d88fe3ce695e5d345e6fc4a6.jpg

 

This was my first OSL attempt ever, some time ago now.

Looking back I realize I didn't paint the light source properly. It should be far lighter.

I simply attempted to do some dry brushing of the blue colour on the places I figured would be hit.

The aproach needs to change, I guess I'm forgetting some steps :) but wanted to share my attempt aswell.

Edited by Venun
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Black, purple, dark red, and gold go a long way. Any combination of the above should work. I have one set of cultists in black and purple with gold accents, and another in black and red. 

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A bit late to this post but I am also trying OSL for the first time. Here is my work in progress, one of the figures from the 1982 Grenadier Call of Cthulhu boxed set. I think I may be a bit heavy handed with the yellow highlights; would it be better to do a low white light from the lantern and do more natural colors? Any advice would be most welcome. I have to say she looks better in a shadowy setting rather than in broad daylight, but I'm thinking making it work in broad daylight would be the optimum result.

IMG_0692.jpeg

IMG_0693.jpeg

IMG_0694.jpeg

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