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Reuse Blister Packs?


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I've used some for glass and similar things with various projects.

 

I'd also made some animated brooms/mops that I used pieces of a blister for a base (Basically took a toothpick that I cut to length, then used a bit of hot glue to attach it to the base and more hot glue to work upwards a little bit to shape the majority of the bristles which I then used a knife to work a bit more into shape.)

 

It's also good for larger amounts of glue that might need to be thinned out for work, or to work white glue and fine flock to make a moss mix.

 

You can also use it for ice effects, use some superglue and spread it thinly on the surface and breathe on it, the frosting effect tends to look a lot like a lake surface that's frozen over,.

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I've cut them in pieces to use to shore up a base that's a little too short when it put it on another base or am building it up some other way.

I've cut strips as glue applicators. Useful when you have a foot or something come up off the base and you just need to slide a little glue under.

They're basically clear plasticard/styrene, so they do have uses!

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In addition to the above, I use them to hold sand or flock for basing.  Put a little in the blister, dip the glue covered base into it...

I have used them at cons or paint events to hold water for brush rinsing.  Easier to pack into my kit than a big cup, or if you forget one.  A lot get used around the house for 2-part epoxy. I keep the larger blisters as trays to hold finished figures, so I can carry 4-6 at a time to the garage for spraying. Also good for holding all the parts together in one place during assembly. 

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 If you glue two or more layers of them together with superglue, they actually have a fair bit of structural integrity - you can cut them up into flat sections and get a decent amount of material out of a single blister, especially a  large one.

It's pretty simple to make a flat shield, and you can add a slight curve to the shield by gluing two or more layers together and taping them down firmly to a curved surface before the glue dries.

You can make edged weapons by cutting out two identical pieces, and then cutting a third just slightly larger on the sides that will have edges - glue the three together with the larger one in the center, and weight it down until it cures so it doesn't warp. Then use a couple additional layers of carefully-applied glue to build up the edge of the blade.

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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