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I think it turned out well.

 

top tip: try painting a layer of either ochre / buff or reddish brown/ chestnut before you paint orange, depending on if you want it bright or muted. I find this saves a lot of coats/unevenness. (also, use buff or bone under yellow, same reason), especially if you use black or grey undercoats.

Edited by Maledrakh
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