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Since we have lockdown where I live I was put on short term work. This gives me a lot of free time, a good part of which I am using to improve my painting. I have no formal art education whatsoever and am trying to make up for this by watching a lot of youtube and experimenting (and posting questions here on the board...). 

 

Recently I started a project where I challenged myself to using only a few paints for a mini. During my youtube research I found a lot of videos about mixing all your colours by using only primary colours. I found this concept really fascinating and want to try it out with my mini painting.

 

The colours used for this were  blue (rather dark, ultramarineish), red, yellow, brown (something like a burnt umbra) and a white. The video recommended using single pigment paints. Since the artist was using oil paints for his demo, I can't just go out and buy those specific paints, so I need their equivalents in miniature paints, preferably Reaper.

 

Which paints would be best for this kind of paint mixing? For white, Pure White is probably a no brainer. For the rest, I lack experience. 

 

I would be thrilled for some recommendations from anyone who has tried such a technique already - or knows a bit about the properties of the reaper paints.

 

Thanks for your help!

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If you want single pigment paints, the Reaper equivalent are what they call Clear Brights (or just Clear as printed on the label).  The MSP Core line has a single pigment Red, Yellow, Green Blue, Purple, and Magenta.  As you already mentioned, you'll also want Pure White and Pure Black.

 

There is also a Clear Orange, Phthalo Green, and Phthalo Blue that are limited edition.  I don't believe these are in stock at the moment.

 

There are also a few colors that are "hidden" single pigment colors.  9074 Palomino Gold is Yellow Ochre for instance.  I think there are a couple others but I can't think of them off the top of my head. 

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The real problem, talking about primary colors, is that when you paint you are subtracting light, and the primary colors aren't Red, Yellow and Blue, but instead Cyan, Magenta and Yellow. 
You need to add to those colors Black, White and Burnt Umber and/or Sienna, that's 'cause Black contains Blue and if you mix it to Yellow (or colors containing Yellow) you will get a Green/insh color.
Now this kinda work when painting canvas, cause the base is usually White or off/white, but in miniature painting you have to face the reality that pure pigments are usually transparent (and pigments that are not transparent are often toxic), and the base rarely is white (until you are a masochist :D ).

Look, maybe I'm wrong, but after years in painting, I've found that, in the end, you need more than 12 colors for miniatures, while when painting canvas you may limit to use 6 to 12/13 colors.

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Kimera brand paints are designed for this sort of mixing, but they are pricey and prone to going out of stock. That said, if you want really high end single pigment miniatures paint, they're outstanding.

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9 hours ago, Cyradis said:

Kimera brand paints are designed for this sort of mixing, but they are pricey and prone to going out of stock. That said, if you want really high end single pigment miniatures paint, they're outstanding.

 

I looked last night and they had 9 sets left in stock 

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Thanks for all your help and your replies!

 

In the meantime I searched this forum for some further infos. The idea of replicating artists paints with reaper seems to come up frequently, but - as @Cicciopiu wrote - it's not as easy as I thought it would be. So here's a bit of Info that I found (this is only theory, as stated above I don't have any formal art education and almost no experience):

 

First there is the question of which system to use, i.e. red/blue/yellow vs. cyan/magenta/yellow. The latter is "more correct", however you have to have exactly the right kind of hue for it to work. And while it works with dyes it probably does not work as good with pigments, because there are no pigments that match the exact hues. A good explanation by Anne Foerster, the creator of the paint line, can be found here.

 

So for paints, the way to start seems to be the red/yellow/blue version, the one used by traditionally trained artists. You use the three primary colours red, yellow and blue, and in addition white and burnt umbra. Black would be mixed by combining blue and umbra. With this system you seemingly cannot mix all colours (especially bright orange and blue-greens seem to be difficult) but colours most colours found in nature should come out ok. Again, that's what I read/heard, not what I experienced.

Now, Reaper paints are not artist paints. A lot of the classical pigments are not used by reaper, because they are toxic (as Cicciopiu mentioned), or too expensive, or both. In this thread Anne posts about exactly this topic and explains why Reaper paints cannot be used for imitating mixing with artist oil paints.

 

One very interesting way to go would be the Kimera paint set that @Cyradis mentioned - single pigment, high density paints made especially for mixing. Probably this is exactly what I would need for serious experimenting. I'm not sure I'm THAT serious about it, though. On one hand the set is kind of expensive, on the other hand there are already about 200 paint bottles on my shelf. So maybe I should refrain.:unsure:

 

I think I'll start playing around with the paints that @Clearman suggested and use the clears. Maybe I'll add some stand-ins for burnt umbra and ultramarine, RMS russet brown and RMS ultramarine shadow come to mind there. And then just see where I land. After all, I just want to get some experience with how paints work, I don't want to completely revise my way of painting to using only a few - because somehow I love having lots of different paints on my shelves.:blush:

 

Finally I found a very helpful post from Wren that will help me get started. You can find it on the first page of this thread. (The topic was almost the same one I was asking here...)

 

So thanks again, now I'm off to order a few of the paints I don't already have... :ph34r:

 

Edit: Just watched the youtube video recommended in the other thread by wren where Anne talks about good colours for mixing. This was the info I was looking for. Highly recommend to watch: HERE

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If  you're really adventurous and want to go off-brand, I'd also recommend checking out the Scale 75 ScaleColor Artist tube paint.  They are not all single pigment like the Kimera colors mentioned above, but list the actual pigment codes used to mix each color.  Since they are also tube creams, you would get closer a canvas mix experience.  

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If you want to do the red, yellow, blue option I'd highly recommend doubling it to have a warm and a cool version of each. A good starting place is buys some inexpensive acrylics and painting some color wheels. It wouldn't be as good of an experience as higher end single pigment paints, but it's a pretty classic place to start learning the fundamentals of color mixing.

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