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All Of Them Witches: Salem Sisters and NorthStar Parson


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Those Witches made that pig fly!

The Man of faith prayed and got it down but the Witchhunter only saw that and now accuses the Man in Brown of Witchcraft!

Of course the sweet devout ladies are happy to testify!

 

Wonderful work!

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Thank you all! 

On 4/27/2021 at 8:46 PM, Chaoswolf said:

Good work on everyone involved in this case of witchcraft.

Thank you! Getting to the bottom of it sounds like a job for player characters. 

On 4/27/2021 at 4:45 AM, Glitterwolf said:

Those Witches made that pig fly!

The Man of faith prayed and got it down but the Witchhunter only saw that and now accuses the Man in Brown of Witchcraft!

Of course the sweet devout ladies are happy to testify!

Wonderful work!

Thank you! It certainly looks that way...I want to run this adventure now. 

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