Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 12
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Thanks H/K/G! I think weathering is a key element in tank models. I think it was Shep Paine who said tanks don't move on the land; they move through it. So, I add a degree of scrapes, scratches, abrasions, chips, mud, dirt, and dust. Apart from the occasional dented/wrinkled fender, I don't usually put a lot of battle damage on them. Or stowage. Just a thing,

 

I wonder if there's a class in there somewhere... I can't see much difference in weathering a Sherman vs a Warhammer Baneblade...

Link to post
Share on other sites

INCREDIBLE!!!!!! awesome stuff man! I have a personal project going trying to build a Canadian Kangaroo APC my grand dad was on through the Italian campaign. It was a converted Sherman M4, still have a long way to go (trying to find reference photo's of the interiors is just about impossible)   

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I recall, Canada used converted Ram tanks (similar to an early Sherman), Shermans, M7 Priests, and Sextons (similar to a Priest, but with a different gun. They were used as early APCs and gun tractors for towing artillery. Do you know exactly what variant your grandfather had?

Link to post
Share on other sites

The only real thing I have is a photo. The Ram's are for sure the first & foremost versions but I've read when production was halted/couldn't meet demand.....whatever the reason some Sherman's were retrofitted for use. Grand dad passed away before I was born so no chance to ask/clarify things. I'm currently awaiting (the very long wait/time) for his war records to be released to me.

This is a touched up photo my cousin did as the original has several creases/folds, it was carried in his wallet for many years I'm told.

 

kewley gerald 3 cc6052 national defence photograph retouched (1).jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok... to the photo. This appears to be an early production M4A1 Sherman cast hull sans turret. It lacks the front visor flaps (mostly used on the earliest production vehicles) on the driver/co-driver hatch housings and carries the early three-piece bolt-on transmission housing. The small shield casting on the nose indicates a vehicle from the Montreal Locomotive Works with hulls sourced from General Steel in Eddystone, PA or Granite City, IL. The hull has the integral .30 machine gun housing, but lacks the gun itself (these are normally retained to provide cover fire for exiting troops). It appears to have the Canadian Dry-Pin steel tracks. Note use of the CDP tracks required the use of a different drive sprocket, What can't be discerned is the use of M3 Lee bogie wheels or the later Sherman bogie wheels and whether the wheels were spoked or solid (stamped). My M10 has the latter with the track skid and trailing arm for the track return roller. The Lee bogies had no skid and the return roller was mounted directly on top of the bogie assembly. There's no shortage of pics of these. FWIW, Sherman wheels, drive sprockets, idler wheels, and bogie assemblies are a study in themselves.

 

I've never seen any pics (that I can recall) of any variant of a Kangaroo interior. All I know was the turret and all hull ammo racks were removed, 'bench seating' installed, and a metal plate was added between the troop and driver's compartments. I have the impression that the plate completely blocked troop access to the drivers' compartments. I also don't know what, if any changes were made to the turret ring itself (it might be safe to assume the turret gear ring was removed). The crew consisted of a vehicle commander, a driver, and a co-driver/gunner/radio operator. The troop complement consisted of 8-12 troops or as many as they could cram in and on the vehicle. Military expediency and all that...

 

HTH

 

Glen

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By GlenP
      Welcome to part 2. This is Tamiya's 1/35 Cromwell cruiser tank, part of the British units operating in Normandy in 1944. The basic paint scheme is a combo of Mr Color acrylic lacquers and Testor's Model Master enamels followed by black oil paint general and pinpoint washes, Reaper MSP tan, brown, and red-brown washes for the basic weathering, colored pencils for the paint chipping, scratches, and rust, and earth-tone chalk pastels for the final dust coats. Pretty much the same techniques as the KV-1b posted earlier.
       
      Qs and Cs welcomed.
       
      Glen





  • Who's Online   7 Members, 0 Anonymous, 36 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...