Jump to content

Reaper Bones V tackiness/stickiness - any help?


Pancakeonions
 Share

Recommended Posts

Got my Reaper Bones V goodies a bit ago, and slapped some paints onto the Pumkinhead beholder.  I used Citadel Wraithbone primer, contrast paints, and Army Painter Matte varnish and...  months later it remains slightly tacky.  It's not...  awful.  But it's enough that if I put it away in a box with other minis, I'm afraid it won't mix well.  I've left it out in the sun for a day, thinking that might 'bake' the stickiness out of it...  It did not.  

 

I got Reaper Bones because I figured I could paint, varnish and throw into a box with all my prepainted minis.  Some of my older bones remain slightly tacky too.  But I figured that with this new round of Reaper Bones, they would have got that figured out.  I've painted up the undead giant, but not yet varnished him and I'm afraid to!

 

I've read the various Reaper Bones help threads, many of which are very old (and one sent me to Facebook, though it looks like it's no longer available.  I don't do social media anymore, so not sure?). 

 

Does anyone have any advice to help a guy out?  I'm pretty sure I shook my rattlecan varnish adequately.  I do live in western San Francisco and wonder if the humidity (fog, it's often cool and misty regardless of the season) may affect this.  I try to wait until the weather is clear.

 

What are you doing to keep your Bones stickiness-free?  Any advice you might have would be helpful.

 

Update 3 Nov 21: over time the tackiness was getting worse; I could no longer pick up the model for fear of leaving a nasty finger print...  (In particular, the elements that had GW's "Nurgles Rot" technical paint for some reason reacted really badly, and were quite gooey!)  But I finally got a pot of Testors brush on Dullcoat/varnish and it worked like a charm.  The figure is no longer tacky.  If that changes, I'll come back to update again!  🙂

Edited by Pancakeonions
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 19
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

I don't do original Bones; never could paint them.  More recent Bones show more promise.

 

Lay on a relatively thick primer coat, covering everything.  Let it dry for a couple of days.  When you are sure it is completely dry, use a hair dryer on it.

 

Paint it.  Let it dry for a couple of days.  Hair dryer.

 

Avoid varnish, if possible,  If you have to, use a brush on, preferably Reaper.  Same advice on drying.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Pancakeonions said:

 

What are you doing to keep your Bones stickiness-free?  Any advice you might have would be helpful.

 

Wash first. I use soap and water, others use isopropyl alcohol.  I use spray primer but have not had good results with contrast paint over that, it's much better on a layer of paint. I don't know if it leads to stickiness. 

 

With spray primer you've got to go very light with it. Think sheer fabric, not full coverage. If it gets heavy and glossy it's going to be sticky.  Bones 1-3 weren't too bad, but it's harder to prime 4 & 5 and not have it get sticky. 

 

FWIW, humidity here in the midwest is awful and I don't find it affects my end results at all.   Things take longer to dry, but they get there. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't use rattle-can, not primers neither varnish, on bones: solvents and bones do not react well and it ends up tacky. If you do not like brush-on primers invest in a basic airbrush you gonna use just for priming.

Here  you'll find all you need to know about priming bones.

Quoting @Wren : "Aerosol spray primers and some spray paints can have some issues with Bones (and with other plastics). The chemicals in some of these primers and paints do not react well with Bones. The main effect seems to be that the primer never completely cures, remaining tacky to the touch. Some will also fail to form a bond with the Bones material."

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can tell you *why* it's sticky, if that helps much (probably not).  Bones are PVC.  The same stuff as polymer clay, which has the exact same issue.  Toluene, the solvent that makes spray paint work, has the same effect on PVC that it does on brain cells and has no qualms about squirming its little methylbenzene way through the microscopic gaps in several layers of acrylic paint to cuddle.  PVA-based brush on sealer seems to fix the problem.

TLDR: If you spray Bones, use an airbrush.  If you forget this, Ceramcoat matte sealer may help.

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/7/2021 at 10:08 PM, kitchen_wolf said:

I can tell you *why* it's sticky, if that helps much (probably not).  Bones are PVC.  The same stuff as polymer clay, which has the exact same issue.  Toluene, the solvent that makes spray paint work, has the same effect on PVC that it does on brain cells and has no qualms about squirming its little methylbenzene way through the microscopic gaps in several layers of acrylic paint to cuddle.  PVA-based brush on sealer seems to fix the problem.

TLDR: If you spray Bones, use an airbrush.  If you forget this, Ceramcoat matte sealer may help.

 

Found this thread too late...😭

 

So, do you think there is any chance of this Toluene stuff evaporating over time?

I fear I just ruined my wall of ice mini I painted during RVE. Here's how NOT to do it:

  1. Paint the Wall of Ice during RVE and be proud of the result.
  2. Attach it to bigger base as a backdrop for another mini
  3. Seal it with reaper brush on gloss sealer so nothing will happen to it
  4. I'ts sealed now, so I'm safe and can do anything I want with it, right?
  5. Give it a coat of expensive Sennelier gloss varnish for artists, for that extra shine (my favourite gloss varnish at the moment)
  6. Varnish becomes tacky
  7. Cry on the forum

@Pancakeonions: I feel your pain!

  • Sad 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Samedi said:

 

 

  1. Give it a coat of expensive Sennelier gloss varnish for artists, for that extra shine (my favourite gloss varnish at the moment)
  2.  

 

Isn't that a resin based varnish?  An actual varnish, not acrylic sealer? The kind used with oil paints?  You might try brushing some turpentine over it, and seeing if the stickiness can be reduced. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Artists

I do not have much useful knowledge of varnishes to share. However, I suspect that Inarah is correct. One thing I do know is that modern fine art varnishes are designed to be removed so curators can more easily clean and restore artworks. 

You could do a test spray of the Sennelier varnish on some styrene or even just an old yoghurt container and test using turpentine (I'd probably start with odourless mineral spirits, though be aware those are still off-gassing chemicals even if you don't smell them). For kicks I'd probably start by trying 91% rubbing alcohol. For a really thorough test, I'd first paint my test material with the same kind of paint you used on the figure, then the varnish, then let it sit a while to cure, and then start testing. They use something like Q-tips on paintings I think, but you could also try applying the removers with an old brush and see how that goes.

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/23/2021 at 5:56 PM, Inarah said:

 

Isn't that a resin based varnish?  An actual varnish, not acrylic sealer? The kind used with oil paints?  You might try brushing some turpentine over it, and seeing if the stickiness can be reduced. 

Thanks @Inarah. Actually I'm not sure, it just says "for acrylics and oil, but there's some acetone in it, so you may be right.

 

What I forgot to mention was Step 4.5:

First apply another safety coat of Army Painter Satin Spray Varnish, because I have it and never use it much. So there's your acrylic rattle can. 🤭

 

As for the turpentine: I'm way too scared to try that. So I'll just let it sit and let the chemistry do it's thing. Maybe it will stay tacky, maybe it will eventually harden and maybe I'll end up with a blob of slime. We'll see...

 

If I remember I'll post how it went in a few weeks, for science!

 

Also, thanks @Wren, seems we posted at the same time. Since this mini wasn't meant for the table, I take "tacky" and see how it works out.😊

 

EDIT:

Now it's december. I promised to report back, for science. Still tacky, so that's that...

Edited by Samedi
Needed to thank Wren as well!
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Samedi said:

Thanks @Inarah. Actually I'm not sure, it just says "for acrylics and oil, but there's some acetone in it, so you may be right.

 

What I forgot to mention was Step 4.5:

First apply another safety coat of Army Painter Satin Spray Varnish, because I have it and never use it much. So there's your acrylic rattle can. 🤭

 

As for the turpentine: I'm way too scared to try that. So I'll just let it sit and let the chemistry do it's thing. Maybe it will stay tacky, maybe it will eventually harden and maybe I'll end up with a blob of slime. We'll see...

 

If I remember I'll post how it went in a few weeks, for science!

 

Also, thanks @Wren, seems we posted at the same time. Since this mini wasn't meant for the table, I take "tacky" and see how it works out.😊

Please share your science results.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/23/2021 at 1:58 PM, Samedi said:

Thanks @Inarah. Actually I'm not sure, it just says "for acrylics and oil, but there's some acetone in it, so you may be right.

 

What I forgot to mention was Step 4.5:

First apply another safety coat of Army Painter Satin Spray Varnish, because I have it and never use it much. So there's your acrylic rattle can. 🤭

 

As for the turpentine: I'm way too scared to try that. So I'll just let it sit and let the chemistry do it's thing. Maybe it will stay tacky, maybe it will eventually harden and maybe I'll end up with a blob of slime. We'll see...

 

If I remember I'll post how it went in a few weeks, for science!

 

Also, thanks @Wren, seems we posted at the same time. Since this mini wasn't meant for the table, I take "tacky" and see how it works out.😊

 

Their website says it's "Synthetic resin based final varnish. Completely colorless. Rapid drying. Gives a resistant film, but is difficult to reverse. Only apply to completely dry paint.
Thinner: Rectified Turpentine spirit." So it looks like it already contains turpentine and as best I can tell is intended for oil paint rather than acrylics. There is a reasonable chance that the tackiness is the solvent in the varnish reacting with varnish you already put on.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, cmorse said:

So it looks like it already contains turpentine and as best I can tell is intended for oil paint rather than acrylics. 

 

Thanks for the information, @cmorse

 

On the can it says for acrylics and oils, so the Sennelier varnish has been my go-to for my newer pewter figures so far. I never had any issues - in fact, it worked very well. Always did two coats of Sennelier Gloss followed by a light dusting of AP Anti-Shine and I was very happy with the results. Could be that I was just lucky until now, though... 😊

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Samedi said:

 

Thanks for the information, @cmorse

 

On the can it says for acrylics and oils, so the Sennelier varnish has been my go-to for my newer pewter figures so far. I never had any issues - in fact, it worked very well. Always did two coats of Sennelier Gloss followed by a light dusting of AP Anti-Shine and I was very happy with the results. Could be that I was just lucky until now, though... 😊

 

I might have looked at the wrong one on their website then. The picture of what I looked at only had oil paints listed on it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't back Bones V, but, last I heard, Bones doesn't need primer. The plastic is still hydrophobic, so you can't just apply a wash or water-thinned paint on it. 

 

Dunno the updates, but here's Wren's thread about the "first coat" on Bones : https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/48669-bones-the-first-coat-is-the-difference/

Brown liner is (was) a commonly recommended "first coat" : https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/68863-base-coating-with-brown-liner/

Chris Palmer has a blog of how he paints Bones, including Bones V. I think he even used craft paint for the "first coat". : https://allbonesabout.blogspot.com/

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Similar Content

    • By Chaoswolf
      This is s figure that I painted during a speed painting class at Reapercon a couple years ago. I decided to go  back and clean up a couple things that I think could have been a little better. I know that's not quite the idea of speed painting, but I brought him to my tabletop standard, so I'm happy with him now.
       

       

       

    • By Darcstaar
      I already finished terrain for Q2.  I had started the Strumpet.  Categories I’m working on:
      Large Group: Townsfolk Strumpet
      Large Figure: Cave Spider
      Theme April Showers: Deep Dweller with an acrylic resin on part of the base to look wet.
      Pop Up: 3 townsfolk
      Pop Up: Gothic Ritual: Torture equipment with blood spatter.
      Seasonal: Petey for Deep Dish Pizza Day
      Heavy Mod: Tree of Despair victim: want to reposition head, ropes, spread legs, gouge out middle and sculpt intestines to look like his torturers eviscerated him.
    • By kazmania7
      Havn't done much painting this past month, mainly been doing spring cleaning which wore me out. but did manage to get this done in between naps, lol. Love and watched the way Anne Forster did hers on reaper pro tips (twitch) and had to paint it, of course even thou wish I could of copy her skin tone that just wouldn't be fair, so I did my own spin on it.





    • By Grumpy Cave Bear
      More minis from my Shelf of Shame Long-Term, Partially-Completed Backlog:  A trio of kobolds from one of the Reaper Bones kickstarters! 
       

       
      These are some of the tiniest minis I've painted.  Even so, it took about 2 long evenings to complete them.
       
      I did lots of practice of NMM steel and gold.  I'm now of the opinion that NMM works better than metallics for small minis.
       
      The clothing was originally red, but I found it was too close to the orange of the skin color and just blended together from about 2 feet away, so they got repainted to a color/tone that was more distinct.
       
      I prefer that my kobolds be weird dog/lizard hybrid creatures, so they all got black noses.  It looks good on these!
       
      That brings the total minis I've painted this year to 19! (With another one in the wings.) 
    • By strawhat
      A few weeks ago I made a bit of a cheeky post where "Lassie" tried to get some help for poor Timmy (who had, quite unsurprisingly, fallen down a well).  Well, the Thing in the Well wasn't quite finished at the time.  That has since been rectified.
       
      I present to you: The Thing in the Well/The Well of Doom!
       
        
       
       
       
      The well was painted up with my favorite craft paint combo: Delta Ceramcoat Chocolate Cherry, Burnt Sienna, and Terra Cotta.  Truly great stuff!  And it's not grey!  I honestly think I'm going to use that trio for most of my stone scenery.
       
      I left the fluid unattached and painted the inside of the well with a couple shades of dark blue (I no longer remember which ones).  But I'm not sure whether or not I'll ever take the brain out of the well, so it was just a whim and not anything really planned.
       
      The first part of the beastie I tackled was the well "water."  I knew I wasn't going to paint it up like blue water.  I was hoping to create a rather unnatural vibe.  I thought about green, but ended up using the NMM Gold triad.  I don't know if I got the shading right, as I was trying to make the fluid darker where it would be thicker/deeper and paler near the edges and peaks.
       
      The brain was next.  I used the Vampiric Skin triad for the grey matter.  The veins/arteries along the surface were originally going to be red...and then I remembered that squid blood isn't red.  Squid blood is blue.  So out went the red (not for the only time this project).  I used Nightmare Black to serve as a base for Ritterlich Blue and Brilliant Blue topped off the highlights.  You can't see the "cerebellum," but I used Imperial Purple, Amethyst Purple, and Spectral White to paint it up.  I was on a "cool" colors kick.  
       
      And then the tentacles.  Ugh.  Not "ick," "ugh."  My original, scatter-brained plan was to try to emulate the humboldt squid.  Those rather nasty pieces of work pulse red when they're agitated.  So I painted the backs of all the tentacles red.  Then I put the fluid in the well and started dry-fitting the tentacles.  It didn't work.  None of it.  Not the shade of red and not the fit of the tentacles.  I ended up pinning four of the tentacles to the fluid base.  There just didn't seem to be enough "plug" on them to properly sit in the base and I didn't want to drown the thing in glue.  One of those pins is rather questionable, though, but it's all holding for now.  The mold lines are another issue.  I should have checked more carefully before I started, but these aren't for much beyond my own grins and giggles.  I can forgive a few mold lines.
       
      After getting the tentacles nice and attached, I pondered for a bit and ended up choosing the Twilight Colors triad (another favorite) for the backs.  I chose the Rosy Flesh triad for the underside of the tentacles, and the Bone Colors Triad for the hooks on the suckers.  And that's about it.
       
      Thanks for stopping by!
  • Who's Online   9 Members, 1 Anonymous, 17 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...