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    • By Wardenstein
      Hi, folks. First-time picture-poster, over on these forums. I hope I'm "doing things correctly" or close to it? Let me know, if I'm not.

      This is a resin bust by Boxing Dog Model Kits. It's of the band mascot, "Eddie," associated with the musical group, "Iron Maiden". I believe this sculpt was based on the album art for a musical single called "Aces High"; if memory serves, anyway.

      I'm assuming the bust kit is likely no longer on the market? I say that because I believe it was a pretty limited run to begin with, and I know this build-up / paint-up that I did is from about 2014. That's when the "Horror and Monster Modeller" special issue of "Sci-Fi & Fantasy Modeller" came out. This model was featured in an article I wrote, for that publication. (See pages 113 through 121 in that issue.)

      The main thing the article talked about was the physical modifications I had made to the solid resin parts, so that I could put some acrylic rods inside the head, with the rounded-off ends of those rods serving as "eyes" that I could make "glow" by placing some small, flashlight-style light bulbs (not LEDs) in two tunnels than ran under those rods. The actual electrical system is shown here: it's fairly simple, by electronics standards. The pictures here, with the notes I included, give a decent idea of what I did to get the eyes actually lit up, and "glowing". Part of the reason I was going with "real light bulbs," instead of LEDs, was to be able to turn them up or down in intensity. Also, the coloring was going to look like the LEDs of that time period, if I had installed those. The "yellow glow" from "real" light bulbs seemed much preferable.

      As for the paint job ... some parts I'm reasonably happy enough with -- at least, given where my skills are or where, back then -- and some  areas on this model ended up being "basecoat only; then I had to stop" due to the restrictions of time. (I had this project, plus three other projects, that did appear in that same special issue; plus one that didn't get completed in time: so unfortunately none of the articles I was working on, for that particular issue, really got the time or care I would have wanted each of them to have, in an ideal world). I bit off a bit more than I could chew, methinks, in hindsight? Sometimes, real life gets in the way, too; as it did with this project, and the other three or four. But I was pretty stoked about having stuff in that first-ever special issue. As is often the case with deadline models of any kind, a person just has to do what they can, and prioritize what's possible and what's not, within the time they have available. But with four other models being worked on, and all at roughly the same time ... yeah, no, that special issue was not my finest moment. Still fun to work on, though: even if I feel I have more reasons to be proud of the eleven other articles I'd done with SF&FM, before the "Horror" special issue came out. 

      I keep telling myself that, one day, perhaps, I may re-paint portions of this? Or at least "finish" the "basecoated, only" areas where I simply had to stop where things were, so that I could get the photos and words turned in, for that particular article's deadline. But for now, this is still what the kit looks like, even nearly a decade after that "Aces High" article first came out, in 2014. Even though I was under-whelmed with my own performance, paint-job-wise, on a number of areas on this kit, local fans of that musical group were depressed that I would not give this model to them, or sell it to them, so not everyone was as harsh as I myself was, on whether or not I'd done an acceptable job, on this kit. (I gave them nice, big, hi-res photos, instead. They seemed happy enough with that; and I can still see lit-up Evil Eddie, whenever I want to.)

      EDIT: I should probably add that the article's mentioned Reaper's paint lines; along with things like extenders or drying retarders, and what I believe was originally Jen Haley's mix of that plus flow improver. The paints used on this were a combination of paint brands and types: some of it being Tamiya brand acrylics; some of it being Reaper's paints; some of it being various kinds of metallics. Primer was an automotive gray by Plasti-Kote. To seal the "light tunnels" and prevent light leaks, I had even used some of One-Shot's brand of paints that are made for things like pin-striping work. Some portions of what's seen here (the goggles, in particular) started as a homemade decal or transfer, of a photo of some clouds, that I later painted over in places, with "flak bursts" and a reflected, flaming, shot-down enemy aircraft. The overall paint work is a combination of hand-brushing, in places, plus some airbrush work: mostly for base-coating, but also used occasionally "for effects". There is some evidence of veins running, just under the skin; but it's pretty hard to tell that it's there, once I shrank these images, for uploading. 




    • By Inarah
      32 mm STL, resin and metal miniatures of Mythos Villians with serious references to characters from popular culture!
       
      48 hour Early Bird pledge level. 
       

       
      I've been pleased with the quality of their STL files from previous projects. 
       
      https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/saberandblood/mythos-villains
    • By Rigel
      The scrubby Western desert. Early morning. The weather is clear, and Meyer Herrick, impresario and director has a FULL schedule.
       

       
      Jimmy Ishikawa, cameraman and technician, makes sure the machinery is all running smoothly. 

       

       
      Grips and stagehands haul on setpieces for the first shoot of the day--a period epic of Egyptian palace intrigue. 

       
      Clapper and general assistant Eddie Green makes sure breakout star Clara Haroutian is prepared and familiar with her blocking.

       

       
      And here's the Old Man himself, shouting as usual!
      '
       
      ROLL CAMERA! 

       

       
      CUT! After several takes, Meyer is at least temporarily satisfied, and ready to shoot the next scene the studio needs, a bit of Greek tragedy. Once a darling of the limelight and the boards, Gordon Audifax is now a drunken has-been, taking a last shot at fame with the detested motion-pictures that stole his livelihood. Still a pro though!
       
      And with that segment finally wrapped and in the can (after much hollering and greasepaint touch-ups) the great director moves on from Illuminating Art to the stuff that keeps the lights on at the studio: stock Westerns. 
       

       

       

      Rio Wilson and Miguel Alvarez trade squibs and quips that will later be written on title cards. 

      CUT! You dash-blanking dod-durned dunderheads! Props knew we needed a castle wall backdrop for the swashbuckling scene, where the blue blinking blanked blazes is it?!
      Someone's gonna get fired so hard they won't never work in this town again!

       
      Ah well, we make do. The show must go on! Change the schedule, we'll take five and shoot the soliloquy today instead of tomorrow. Close-up shot, Jimmy!
       

       
      Aaand cut! That's going to be lunch. Check back in with Makeup after and we'll get through the rest of the dance number and the saloon scene!

       
      More pix if you need:

      This is an excellent pulp-era set; the old-timey camera is very detailed, and the spotlights can really swivel up and down. The director I wanted to look like a coarse, vulgar man with an unerring instinct for what audiences want to see, and I think the godawful check suit gets that across. Eddie and Jimmy have a lot of character in their postures and poses. Their presence immediately recontextualizes whatever scene is on display.

      CREDITS:
      Rio and Miguel and one of the stagehands are from Murch's Pulp Figures; the other stagehand is Artizan's Mr. Price. They and Clara (Egyptian Priestess, 03506, without baboon as Herrik refuses to work with monkeys) have been featured before, some of the first figures I posted here in fact. 
      Gordon (Socrates, 50135) was painted so long ago I forget if I posted him separately or not. 
      Edward Dumond (02775) and Hasslefree's Maika vom Ostwald are more recent and may well show up again! 

      --fin!--
       

    • By Auberon
      These minis are twisted.
       
      https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/voidrealmminis/curse-of-the-spiral?ref=recommendation-projectpage-footer-3
       
       

    • By ecs05norway
      Been working on these guys as a test for the squad color scheme. Trying some layering on the white, it's working out well so far.
      They're 1:48 scale, same as Star Wars Legion, and I've rebased them onto the same 27mm bases that Legion uses. Mostly because the standard D1947 bases are like 35mm. Way huge.
       
       

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