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Randomness XVIII: Ex-Vee-Triple-Eye


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1 hour ago, kristof65 said:

But sadly, he's probably not going to accept responsibility for his mistake, and try to get someone else to cover his losses. 

Well, I was wrong. The guilty party stepped forward (one of the distributor techs).  

I also found out that they weren't set up as discount codes, but as codes for the self serve that were being sold online.  For that purpose, they were working as intended. The tech didn't realize they could also give a more expensive automatic wash.  So the losses were only as much as those people who figured out that the would give them a discounted wash, which probably turns out to be less than a few hundred dollars. It also explains why they weren't tested after they were created.  They were tested on the equipment they were intended to be used on, just not on the other equipment. 

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Could be a collaborative effort.

Whatever it is, I wish it would stop.

My friends don't need this kind of  problems in their lives.

Now or ever.

GEM

22 minutes ago, ShadowRaven said:

it's nice, but could I interest you in a pair of toenail clippers?

And silly me thought it was Beast's Cousin modeling the new hardware.

GEM

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10 hours ago, CaptainPete said:

My mind went to two different places with this:

1. You you want ghost clowns? Because this is how you get ghost clowns...

2. Perhaps an angry wife had enough of her husband wearing a clown getup and buried it to keep it away from him.

One is a horror movie just waiting to happen and the other is a sitcom plot.

 

No waiting required.

 

The Clown Motel series of films is about a haunted hotel out in the desert. Decades ago, a group of misfit clowns took over the hotel to form their own idyllic society where they could frolic and dance and be their clown selves away from the mainstream society that mocked them. Some locals from town hear a rumor about how the hotel was built on the site of an old gold mine and come to steal the gold, burning down the hotel with all the clowns inside. Now their damned souls are trapped in the hotel, and visitors to the hotel are killed and become new clowns.

 

Don't google the films,

Don't watch the trailers on Youtube.

Seriously.

Honestly, Rob Zombie would kill himself just so he could roll over in his grave. 

The only reason to be aware of these films is that they star Ari Lehman, who was the first actor to play Jason Voorhees, appearing as the young Jason in the original film.

 

 

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I've been struggling with a math problem in my head all day.  I know it's a simple one, but I just can't seem to get my head around it. 

I am going to design some Traveller spaceships, both paper deckplans and 3d models. My process is going to look like this:

  1. Use Traveller rules to "build" the ship
  2. Use Fusion 360 to layout the basic configuration of the ship in 3d
  3. Draw the deckplans
  4. Use the deckplans to finish detailing the 3d model. 
  5. Print the model

The problem is the relation between step 2 and step 5.  I'm going to use Fusion 360's volume measuring tools to make my hull volume match the displacement tonnage as specified in the Traveller rules, which are basically 14 cubic meters of Hyrdogen = 1 Traveller displacement ton.  Now I could design my ships at full scale in Fusion 360, but then that will create some exporting issues when I go to slice the for printing, so I'm planning on making it easy, and scaling the models by 1:100 - 1 cm = 1 meter, so 1cu cm = 1 cu meter, and thus 14 cu cm will "equal" 1 Traveller dTon. 

But when I go to print my ships, I'm not going to print them at 1:100 scale - I am going to print them at 1:1400, which matches the scale of some other stuff I have. 

I am completely struggling with the formula to figure the percentage I need to put in my slicer to convert them from the 1:100 scale of the digital design to the 1:1400 of the final output. 

know it's stupidly simple, but it's eluding me today - every solution I come up with feels wrong. 

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On 3/2/2022 at 1:48 PM, Chaoswolf said:

Don't rush me sonny, you rush a miracle man, you get rotten miracles. 

 

On 3/2/2022 at 7:28 PM, Green Eyed Monsty said:

If you do have an opportunity to talk to Miracle Max there are several of us who could use some serious help on the headache front.

GEM

 

And don't forget, the chocolate coating on the miracle pill helps it go down easier.

 

Done with day-shifts at work (unless they move me back), on to night shifts. Left work thinking I'd get 5 days off in a row, but now debating whether to take my boss up on the offer to come in and make up some hours I'm losing due to the swap to night shift (12-hour rotating shifts get really confusing to explain without a calendar, so I won't go into the mechanics of it). Otherwise I'm going to be 24 hours below my 80 hours for two weeks, and that's a good chunk of money. Ugh, this sucks. Guess no painting this weekend. Really feels like I see more of work than I do home.

 

Guess I have to stay up all night so I can sleep during the day tomorrow before going in for night shift. Time for a Coke!

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24 minutes ago, kristof65 said:

I've been struggling with a math problem in my head all day.  I know it's a simple one, but I just can't seem to get my head around it. 

I am going to design some Traveller spaceships, both paper deckplans and 3d models. My process is going to look like this:

  1. Use Traveller rules to "build" the ship
  2. Use Fusion 360 to layout the basic configuration of the ship in 3d
  3. Draw the deckplans
  4. Use the deckplans to finish detailing the 3d model. 
  5. Print the model

The problem is the relation between step 2 and step 5.  I'm going to use Fusion 360's volume measuring tools to make my hull volume match the displacement tonnage as specified in the Traveller rules, which are basically 14 cubic meters of Hyrdogen = 1 Traveller displacement ton.  Now I could design my ships at full scale in Fusion 360, but then that will create some exporting issues when I go to slice the for printing, so I'm planning on making it easy, and scaling the models by 1:100 - 1 cm = 1 meter, so 1cu cm = 1 cu meter, and thus 14 cu cm will "equal" 1 Traveller dTon. 

But when I go to print my ships, I'm not going to print them at 1:100 scale - I am going to print them at 1:1400, which matches the scale of some other stuff I have. 

I am completely struggling with the formula to figure the percentage I need to put in my slicer to convert them from the 1:100 scale of the digital design to the 1:1400 of the final output. 

know it's stupidly simple, but it's eluding me today - every solution I come up with feels wrong. 

This may seem like a dumb question, but since I know nothing about Fusion 360 I have to ask.

doesn't the program have sliders for that sort of thing?

As to the percentage, it appears to my battered and abused brain that the ratio is 14 to 1 reduction.

My handy computer desktop calculator says the number is 0.071428571

Unless I'm completely confused and confounded.

Good Luck

GEM

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1 hour ago, kristof65 said:

I've been struggling with a math problem in my head all day.  I know it's a simple one, but I just can't seem to get my head around it. 

I am going to design some Traveller spaceships, both paper deckplans and 3d models. My process is going to look like this:

  1. Use Traveller rules to "build" the ship
  2. Use Fusion 360 to layout the basic configuration of the ship in 3d
  3. Draw the deckplans
  4. Use the deckplans to finish detailing the 3d model. 
  5. Print the model

The problem is the relation between step 2 and step 5.  I'm going to use Fusion 360's volume measuring tools to make my hull volume match the displacement tonnage as specified in the Traveller rules, which are basically 14 cubic meters of Hyrdogen = 1 Traveller displacement ton.  Now I could design my ships at full scale in Fusion 360, but then that will create some exporting issues when I go to slice the for printing, so I'm planning on making it easy, and scaling the models by 1:100 - 1 cm = 1 meter, so 1cu cm = 1 cu meter, and thus 14 cu cm will "equal" 1 Traveller dTon. 

But when I go to print my ships, I'm not going to print them at 1:100 scale - I am going to print them at 1:1400, which matches the scale of some other stuff I have. 

I am completely struggling with the formula to figure the percentage I need to put in my slicer to convert them from the 1:100 scale of the digital design to the 1:1400 of the final output. 

know it's stupidly simple, but it's eluding me today - every solution I come up with feels wrong. 

 

55 minutes ago, Green Eyed Monsty said:

This may seem like a dumb question, but since I know nothing about Fusion 360 I have to ask.

doesn't the program have sliders for that sort of thing?

As to the percentage, it appears to my battered and abused brain that the ratio is 14 to 1 reduction.

My handy computer desktop calculator says the number is 0.071428571

Unless I'm completely confused and confounded.

Good Luck

GEM


Agree with the 1/14th scaling. Look at it this way: lop off two zeros on the end. 1:100 becomes 1:1 and 1:1400 becomes 1:14. So 1/14 will give you the percentage you need. As a check, think and realize that you’ll need something that is 14 times smaller, and so need to divide everything (scale) by 14. 
 

No idea about Fusion360 being able to do that as I am a FreeCAD user. Being a professional CAD user, not having a fully parametric model bugs me to no end. I’m sure FreeCAD could do scale things as well but I’ve never tried. I simply model in the scale I plan to print at. That sometimes requires a spreadsheet be constantly open so I can convert dimensions.

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1 hour ago, kristof65 said:

I've been struggling with a math problem in my head all day.  I know it's a simple one, but I just can't seem to get my head around it. 

I am going to design some Traveller spaceships, both paper deckplans and 3d models. My process is going to look like this:

  1. Use Traveller rules to "build" the ship
  2. Use Fusion 360 to layout the basic configuration of the ship in 3d
  3. Draw the deckplans
  4. Use the deckplans to finish detailing the 3d model. 
  5. Print the model

The problem is the relation between step 2 and step 5.  I'm going to use Fusion 360's volume measuring tools to make my hull volume match the displacement tonnage as specified in the Traveller rules, which are basically 14 cubic meters of Hyrdogen = 1 Traveller displacement ton.  Now I could design my ships at full scale in Fusion 360, but then that will create some exporting issues when I go to slice the for printing, so I'm planning on making it easy, and scaling the models by 1:100 - 1 cm = 1 meter, so 1cu cm = 1 cu meter, and thus 14 cu cm will "equal" 1 Traveller dTon. 

But when I go to print my ships, I'm not going to print them at 1:100 scale - I am going to print them at 1:1400, which matches the scale of some other stuff I have. 

I am completely struggling with the formula to figure the percentage I need to put in my slicer to convert them from the 1:100 scale of the digital design to the 1:1400 of the final output. 

know it's stupidly simple, but it's eluding me today - every solution I come up with feels wrong. 


The original Traveller ships deck plans always, always, always, cheated somewhere on their deck plans. I tried  redrawing some, trying to find better layouts of cabin space etc. and they cheated with their originals. 
 

The cube-age did not add up they usually had more cabin area than the numbers allowed for. 

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47 minutes ago, TGP said:


The original Traveller ships deck plans always, always, always, cheated somewhere on their deck plans. I tried  redrawing some, trying to find better layouts of cabin space etc. and they cheated with their originals. 
 

The cube-age did not add up they usually had more cabin area than the numbers allowed for. 

Is the error consistent across multiple deck plans or is it a random amount for each different plan?

If it's consistent you could introduce a correction factor.

If not, "you're on your own".

Maybe unspecified hyper-dimensional cabin space???

GEM

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