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Getting to know you, January 2022


Corsair
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6 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

Not necessarily favorite, but it's the first one that came to mind: torch.

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7 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

Nothing really comes to mind, other than screech... 

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7 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

 

Ooohh tough one.

 

Well since I visited the USA a few times...Breakfast!

 

 

 

 

Schermafbeelding 2022-01-19 141255.jpg

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7 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

 

I understand that the word "geezer" means a gang member in the UK. In the US it means an old person. I don't know if that's actually true or not. I just like the word geezer.

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7 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

There are tons of technical words or brand names that have evolved into naughty words. So I won't go there.

 

On a side note, even the French language has words with different meanings depending if you're from Quebec or France (Cajun French may have a few surprises of their own).

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8 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

Biscuit. In America is means a fluffy pastry, in Britain it’s a cookie.

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12 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

 

That would be "trolley".  It means "streetcar" here in the States, but means "shopping cart" or other pushcarts in Britain.

 

A second one is "doubt".  This is one I picked up from my company's employees in India -- they use the word "doubt" interchangeably with "question", as in:  "I have a few doubts about this process."  Or: "That concludes my presentation.  If anyone has doubts, enter them in chat and we will try to answer them."

 

That was confusing for a while, until I finally understood what they were trying to say.  I don't know if that usage was widespread, or in just one region of India, either.

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13 hours ago, Corsair said:

Okay, here is the Quizzle for 19 January 2022:

What is your favorite word that has different meanings in different parts of the World?

I'll go with a word that has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used

Lead

Edited by ratsmitglied
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1 hour ago, Great Khan Artist said:

image.thumb.png.3a5f9be689ad429bacaaf635262a877b.png

 

The amusing part about that is "inflammable" is the traditional English word, and "flammable" is a more modern one.  If you were to travel back in time and chastise the American revolutionaries that their incendiary rhetoric would inflame the passions of the populace and ignite the flammable tinderbox of war, they would have to point out you inflame inflammable objects. Flammable won't come about for another generation or so.

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9 hours ago, Auberon said:

 

The amusing part about that is "inflammable" is the traditional English word, and "flammable" is a more modern one.  If you were to travel back in time and chastise the American revolutionaries that their incendiary rhetoric would inflame the passions of the populace and ignite the flammable tinderbox of war, they would have to point out you inflame inflammable objects. Flammable won't come about for another generation or so.

 

Related, but admittedly getting away from the question...

 

Consider the altered current meanings of "Objective" and "Subjective."

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