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How to deal with 3d print lines?


SparrowMarie
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A friend of mine asked me to paint a 3d printed model for her boyfriend's birthday. I got the mini a couple of days ago. There are some minor print errors that I've fixed but I'm not sure how to address the lines left by the printing process.

 

I considered sanding but I have no idea how thick the material is and it is hollow. 

 

How should I go about prepping or painting this with all the lines?

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I haven't tried it myself, so can't vouch for it's suitability or effectiveness, but I've heard of people using a matte or gloss varnish/sealer to  smooth the lines a bit.  Some art-focused sites sell a brush-on product (that I expect is just rebranded/repurposed gloss coat).

 

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51 minutes ago, strawhat said:

I haven't tried it myself, so can't vouch for it's suitability or effectiveness, but I've heard of people using a matte or gloss varnish/sealer to  smooth the lines a bit.  Some art-focused sites sell a brush-on product (that I expect is just rebranded/repurposed gloss coat).

 

 

I lucked out and got a smaller copy of the mini along with the actual copy to be painted. I'll do some testing. Thanks#

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I've used My Hobby's Mr Surfacer on a vehicle, but it would probably obscure details on a mini. There are spray and brush on versions, so it could be worth a try.

 

The approach was to spray, sand, spray, sand etc, with the surfacer gradually filling in the gaps without the model getting too bulked out.

 

Be warned, however, that it's some of the stinkiest stuff I have ever used, so ventillation and a respirator are strongly recommended ☠️

 

edited to remove Tamiya as the manufacturer.

Edited by zemjw
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I use gloss varnish for resin to minimise the appeareance of them.

For FDM, I use sandable filler primer (krylon makes a good one.) to diminish the print lines.  I think it's ok for FDM because there's only so fine that detail will show here anyway. I've tried it on resin and it comes out looking like wizkids pre-primed.....

I know badger developed an airbrush primer specifically for priming 3d prints, though I've never tried it.

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5 hours ago, Cygnwulf said:

I use gloss varnish for resin to minimise the appeareance of them.

For FDM, I use sandable filler primer (krylon makes a good one.) to diminish the print lines.  I think it's ok for FDM because there's only so fine that detail will show here anyway. I've tried it on resin and it comes out looking like wizkids pre-primed.....

I know badger developed an airbrush primer specifically for priming 3d prints, though I've never tried it.

 

I wish I knew that before I bought primer >.< It's ABS or at least that is what I was told. So far a primer then couple layers of gloss have helped. Not totally gone but I think after the next prime it'll be okay enough.

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I don't do this much, but for large flat surfaces I've used Krylon sandable filler primer.  I go back and forth between a thin layer and sanding.  Each step going finner and finner in the sanding grit.  I used paper rated for wet sanding so I can run it under the water in the sink.  To get the finest surface possible step your way up in the grit.  I have 120, 220, 320, 600, 800, and 1500.   I wont lie, this is time consuming but you can stop at any point along the way if you are happy with the finish. 

 

The other thing I've used is XTC-3D.  It's a 2 part resin specifically designed to for 3D print and to settle into the seams and self level.  I used this once on a very rough surface that wasn't practicle to sand.  I had to thin it (denatured alcohol or acetone per the instructions) because it was so thick it was filling details.  But once thinned and applied in a light coat it worked well.  It gives a high gloss finish but can be primed and painted after.

 

Try not to rush things.  If using the sandable filler primer make sure it's fully dry in between sanding.  I rushed things once and didn't get a good result.

 

 

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On 2/28/2022 at 9:57 AM, Cygnwulf said:

 

I know badger developed an airbrush primer specifically for priming 3d prints, though I've never tried it.

 

I checked reviews when it was released. Pretty much all of them said it didn't really fill the lines any more that the regular badger stynylrez.

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