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BunnyPuncher

Warlord Bull Orc Warriors & Narg Bloodtusk

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Here's a few more orcs. The three on the left are the most recently painted. The one on the far right was originally posted a few weeks ago. To my eyes these three show continued improvement.

 

 

So here is the brand new meatshield for my Reven armada...

 

 

BullOrcWarr-CMON.jpg

 

And here's a sideview of old stubby legs...

 

ORCBOSS1.jpg

 

If you guys could provide detailed feedback it would be appreciated as I'm trying to get good enough to do local commission work around christmas.

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Hey, nice grunts! I like the green!

 

Except...the..glare...must...shield...eyes! In other words, a dull coat would help! ::P:

At least, on the metal and the bases.

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Those are intimidating! The big one especially (I wonder why they chose him to be boss?) ::):

I think the wood turned out quite well.

nice work

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Thanks for the feedback guys. The metal is shiny. But thats the problem with using a scanner... any metallic bits lying on the glass flare like a starburst. But I'll add a coat of matte to the armour and weapons.

 

I would request additional feedback. I'm trying to get better and would like some tips on how to improve. Don't feel obligated... but help if you are in the mood.

 

Cheers.

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Ok, I'll give it a go.

 

For tabletop gaming figs, these are gems, so I'm not sure the level of painting you want to achieve.

 

Some simple things to improve on could be your blending. You have a good sense with highlights. Using thinner paints and more layers of increasing shades will make your highlights blend much better and give you smoother transitions. Try shading as well as highlighting to give even more depth. Try experimenting with inks. Some artists poo poo them but I think they have a million and one uses and are just handy.

 

Small details like staining the teeth like you did the horns would add a little something. Go darker with the horns and try painting texture like you did with the wood. Darklining is good to separate and define armor and clothing.

 

Try shading your metallic paints. Example; Use boltgun metal as a base, wash with thinned black ink to darken, highlight with boltgun metal, final highlight with chainmail or mithril or whatever you use that's lighter.

 

Experiment and try new techniques just for fun. Go to your local hobby shop and find the clearance stuff. Have a box ready and fill it with old minis, call it the "guinea pig pen" or something appropriate and save them for trying NMM, skin tones, highlights, whatever. Use the whole surface of the mini to practice each technique on and keep it as reference for later.

 

Errm, I think that's all I have to offer for now. Hope some of this helps and was what you were looking for. It's 12:09AM now and I have to get up at 5:45AM soooo...

 

Look me up if you wanna discuss some of this. Good luck, keep painting.

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Also spend a little more time on the little things...like the Axe haft...

 

Add a bit more gray in your highlights...it will make the greens look a bit more realistic and natural...

 

You might also think about undercoating the metallics...where you want highlights and brighter metallics...first paint white...where you want darker metallics...undercoat with black...and then put thin metallics over the undercoats...

 

Very well done...I think your stuff is getting better...with each mini...

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I'm sorry this isn't advice, but I have a question.

 

Those pictures of your miniatures are scanned!? :huh:

Do you mean you took an actual photograph and scanned the photograph? Or did you just lie your miniatures on your scanner, cover, and digitalize?

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Cool... whinging is rewarded...

 

Thanks Shine and House of Dexter, your comments have been printed off and stored in the painting binder.

 

As to the issue of "standard"...

 

Right now I am trying to paint all my minis to the best level possible with my skills / time available / & financial ability to waste money. As a result, I have improved considerably since April when I started back into "gaming" as a hobby. These (and all my) minis are for tabletop use. My goal, lofty as it is, is to be considered a "good" minipainter. I live in a smaller city, and the "best" in my area, are quite frankly, not a whole heck of a lot better than I am. Thus I turn to the internet where my creations look like dogturds compared to many. My goal is to make my minis less turd like with every effort until I can create a "showcase" level miniature. Basing and such at this time is not key for me, as I really do not want bits of loam and cork being knocked off my figs by grubby little hands and as I travel between events.

 

Thanks again folks.

 

One question... I'm finding it difficult to balance between what I call effect shading (so the detail leaps out at you at table top viewing) and photogenic shading (more subdued but looks good in pictures). Any solution to this conundrum?

 

If you care.. my cmon gallery can be found at http://www.coolminiornot.com/browse/submitter/BunnyPuncher

 

Where so far, some overly generous people have voted (imho, these should end up at around 6.3-6.5).

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I'm sorry this isn't advice, but I have a question.

 

Those pictures of your miniatures are scanned!?  :huh:

Do you mean you took an actual photograph and scanned the photograph?  Or did you just lie your miniatures on your scanner, cover, and digitalize?

Yup.. I just lie the minis in the appropriate positions on the scanner glass (using all sorts of widgets to create the proper angles - that is why you never see the bottoms of my bases), cover the minis with a piece of white cardstock, fart around with the software sliders and scan away.

 

Digital Camera would be much better, but alas I am a poor student and make do with what I have. The one benefit to scanning is that even in a wide shot like that above, everything is in focus.

 

Cheers.

 

FYI... lousy static grass and scanner glass really emphasize the "static" in the term static grass.

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BP...

I did my first "gaming standard" commission work when I was a producing a fraction of the quality you are producing here. I say go for the local commissions...

I'm not sure what your pricing considerations are, but the major things I did:

 

1. Paint for trade---I painted 1 figure for two/three unpainted ones. I still have models left over from this endeavor....to the tune of about 250 of 'em. I still do this for my FLGS owner. Since their costs are much lower than retail, they can afford to give more for the paint job---

That is $100 cash would equal like $125-150 in pewter....that way, everyone wins. You can then paint the pewter and sell it....and come out very much to the good.

 

2. I would find out what everyone was playing---and paint up characters for their armies *before* I had an order. I would then take one to the game store and ask a $ amount for it if anyone showed interest.

 

3. When all else fails, put 'em on ebay.

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