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Privy to Secrets: Nolzur's Outhouse, feat. Wichita Witch, 59027.


Rigel
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22 hours ago, Darcstaar said:

Is nothing sacred?  A man has to use the John, he should be worried it’s a mimic!

 

Great work, though.

I was thinking the same thing. Its downright uncivilized. 

 

Great painting all-around...especially the woodgrain and the mimic's tongue. The humans work well, too. They've got an appropriately dry/dusty feel.

 

I second your recommendation on John Bellairs, btw. Used to read him all the time when I was younger. Great stuff.

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Thanks everyone! I'm glad you enjoyed it. This is a fun multipurpose mini.
 

On 6/23/2022 at 12:35 PM, AlonTey said:

Heck yeah!  Making me wish I hadn’t glued the tongue in mine, repositioning it really changes the feel of the mini.

Well, a little breakage and repainting isn't too hard! It really does add to the character. I just wanted the door to be able to fully close.

 

On 6/23/2022 at 10:31 AM, Zloyduh said:

Your stories are great! 🙂 love them

On 6/23/2022 at 2:13 PM, Samedi said:

Not only a story, but a recommended reading list! Thanks!

On 6/24/2022 at 6:45 PM, Grand Slam said:

I second your recommendation on John Bellairs, btw. Used to read him all the time when I was younger. Great stuff.

Oh, I'm a big pulphead! Heartily recommend all the stories above. I haven't read much Bellairs, but everything I have read has been delightful. 
 

On 6/23/2022 at 8:32 PM, Darcstaar said:

Is nothing sacred?  A man has to use the John, he should be worried it’s a mimic!

Great work, though.

It's a unique and awful terror! (Fun fact, one of the first D&D games I ran had a homebrew outhouse mimic, back in 2016 or so. WOTC definitely didn't get the idea from me but I still feel good inventing it independently.)
On the upside, win or lose, you won't need to use the bathroom further after the encounter. Hope it drops spare pants as loot.

 

On 6/24/2022 at 6:45 PM, Grand Slam said:

Great painting all-around...especially the woodgrain and the mimic's tongue. The humans work well, too. They've got an appropriately dry/dusty feel.

On 6/23/2022 at 9:37 PM, Iridil said:

Love how you painted the inside vs outside. Love the story... another great tale!

Thank you! Matte versus gloss finish is doing most of the heavy lifting on the mimicry...that, and a palette best described as 'gum disease.' 
The cowpokes were some of my early paintjobs, so some of that weathering is the vagaries of time. I like them though. Might go back and give them a touch-up one day. The mustachioed fella is from Murch's Pulp Figures.

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    • By Rigel
      Let's talk about monsters for a bit. The name comes from the same root word as "demonstrate" and "monstrance"--attention-grabbing things that draw the mind to greater matters. Like comets, in ancient times, they were seen as more than just malformed dangerous beasts, but as a sign that something was deeply wrong in the world, or a portent of a great evil drawing near. Offenses against the gods, offenses against nature, great upheavals to the realms. 

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