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Wet Palette Questions


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I am trying to write a post about wt palettes for my blog. My brain has stalled and I cannot think about things to say. So I am here to ask the hive mind.

 

If you are considering getting a wet palette or new to them what kind of things might you want/need to know either before you buy one or just how to get started with it?

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Oh man! So many things! 

 

* does it fit all brands of palette paper?

*  how air tight is it? 

*  does it have any special anti-microbial property? (Low mold)

*  how deep is the tray?

*  any special sponge size needed?

*  what brand of sponges fit with it (without having to cut)?

*  is it stackable or have multiple trays?

*  glass palette or other special properties? 

*  comparable brands with a chart or measurement to rank them and show what they do best or worst. 

 

Hope this helps. 

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27 minutes ago, R2ED said:

Oh man! So many things! 

 

* does it fit all brands of palette paper?

*  how air tight is it? 

*  does it have any special anti-microbial property? (Low mold)

*  how deep is the tray?

*  any special sponge size needed?

*  what brand of sponges fit with it (without having to cut)?

*  is it stackable or have multiple trays?

*  glass palette or other special properties? 

*  comparable brands with a chart or measurement to rank them and show what they do best or worst. 

 

Hope this helps. 

 

Thanks! This is a great jumping off point.

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I only paint to advanced tabletop, but what I've been using recently are children's flip-top craft paint containers as wet-palettes. They're cheap, no assembly required, and take up minimal table space. Because they have less air than DIY wet-palettes, the paints last days rather than hours. The shade of the craft paint differs from the ink and other paints, so I end up mixing more than I would with a regular wet palette. I add a drop of ink or wash to thin the paint. By dipping the brush into the ink or wash, I can switch between paint consistencies. Also, if the eye dropper explodes into the wet palette, I'm not exactly wasting paint -- just close the flip-top and use the paint again the next time! 😛 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Bane Of Humanity said:

Put a penny or piece of copper in it to help keep mold away.

I have heard this advice, as well. And while I know copper is antimicrobial, I have not actually found that doing this in a wet pallet actually helps much. In fairness, I've only tried with (American) pennies. I wonder if the amount of actual copper in pennies is less than it used to be?

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38 minutes ago, Painting Dog said:

I have heard this advice, as well. And while I know copper is antimicrobial, I have not actually found that doing this in a wet pallet actually helps much. In fairness, I've only tried with (American) pennies. I wonder if the amount of actual copper in pennies is less than it used to be?

That is a good point.  im not even sure the new ones have any copper.  

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41 minutes ago, Painting Dog said:

I have heard this advice, as well. And while I know copper is antimicrobial, I have not actually found that doing this in a wet pallet actually helps much. In fairness, I've only tried with (American) pennies. I wonder if the amount of actual copper in pennies is less than it used to be?

Didn't they stop using copper in the early 1980's for US and Canadian pennies? 

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I keep reading posts about people using pennies, copper clothes hangers, or splayed copper wires, but have yet to see some actual tests demonstrating it actually works.

 

What's weirder is that I've had my wet palette go unused for months, sealed and still quite wet, and not get any mould at all. The only unusual thing I've ever done was use boiling water to prep my palette before use.

 

Back to the original post:

  • What can a wet palette do and *not* do? Great for mixing colours and creating gradients, keeping a mix fresh for another day. Not great for dry brushing. Remember, it's a tool to make some techniques easier, not a miracle maker.
  • Paper types. The Sta-Wet paper is made for heavier bodied paints, no the thin consistency of miniature paints. Parchment paper on the other hand is.
  • Examples of wet palette in use.
  • "Pro" grade palettes vs improvised homemade ones.
  • Can you use other mediums with it? I have a small dropper bottle filled with water and few drops of flow improver. It really helps me thin down my paints without them separating. Very useful for thin layers/glazing.
  • Pictures of "completed" wet palette paper. You know the ones where you used nearly every square inch of available space and look like you channelled your inner Jackson Pollock.
  • What kind of paints does it work with? Acrylic paints? Sure. Heavy bodied that comes in a tube? Doable, but needs more work for miniatures. Oil paints? Not so much.

 

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2 hours ago, Cranky Dog said:

The only unusual thing I've ever done was use boiling water to prep my palette before use.

 

How did you do this? I've always been afraid to use boiling water on mine because I worry about warpage.

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1 minute ago, SparrowMarie said:

 

How did you do this? I've always been afraid to use boiling water on mine because I worry about warpage.

I just lay down the bottom half of the tray in the kitchen sink, put my papers on the bottom (I use both the Sta-Wet paper and parchment paper), then the sponge on top, and then pour a kettle full of boiling water.

 

Once everything cooled down, I put my papers on top of the sponge (the Sta-Wet paper is sandwiched between the sponge and parchment), pour out the excess water and I'm ready to go.

 

Maybe it's because I let everything cool down slowly; or it's on a flat surface when I do it; or the palette frame is stiff enough; or it's the weight of the water and wet sponge itself; or a little bit of everything; but I've never been bothered by any warpage. And I've done it many times.

 

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Boiled water (one minute rolling boil) is essentially free of microorganisms.  So long as you don't contaminate it, it makes sense it would be less likely to grow mold.  I usually use hot tap water and Simple Green to clean my sponge or paper towels.  Paper towels are reusable and so is parchment paper if you want to bother.  Simple Green and rubbing the paper have been good at dissolving acrylics that have dried there.

 

Instead of boiling, I've used a spritz of Lysol or similar disinfectant.  Recently I've been using a little Simple Green (which is not a disinfectant), and keeping the wet palette cracked open slightly.  I add water as needed and clean the sponge/towels/paper after a week or so, or as needed.  This has not grown any mold.

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